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Which clippings match 'Microsoft Windows' keyword pg.1 of 3
10 NOVEMBER 2015

Tech Insider: 'Fallout 4' concept art

"The world of 'Fallout' is anachronistically stuck in the post-World War II era of American history. These images represent the retro-futuristic world of 2077, when the game begins."

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2015 • 2287 • adventure game • Bethesda Game Studios • Bethesda Softworks • Bostonbunkercompanion characterconcept artElectronic Entertainment Expo (E3) • Fallout 4 • Fallout series • first-person gamesfirst-person point of viewMicrosoft Windows • non-playable character • nonlinear gameplay • nuclear disasternuclear waropen world • PEGI 18 • Playstation 4post-apocalyptic scenariopost-World War IIquestretro-futuristicrole-playing game (RPG) • scavenging • Tech Insider • third-person perspective • Todd Howard • underground bunker • Vault 111 • video game • vintage ink • wasteland • Xbox One

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 DECEMBER 2012

Cliplets: an interactive animated GIF app for Windows

"Microsoft Research Cliplets is an interactive app that gives users the power to create 'Cliplets' –– a type of imagery that sits between stills and video, including imagery such as video textures and 'cinemagraphs'. The app provides a simple, yet expressive way to mix static and dynamic elements from a video clip."

(Microsoft Corporation, 2012)

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2012animated gifanimated photosappbetween stills and videocinemagraph • Cliplets • dynamic elements • dynamic view • expressive • hybrid visual formimageryin media res • interactive app • interactive toolMicrosoft CorporationMicrosoft Research • Microsoft Research Cliplets • Microsoft Windowsmomentspartially animated photostatictableaux mouvantsvideo clip

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 AUGUST 2012

Learn Microsoft Project in 16 minutes with Dave Litten

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2010 • Dave Litten • Gantt chart • Microsoft Office Project 2010 • Microsoft Project • Microsoft Project 2010 • Microsoft Windows • MS Project 2010 • online tutorial • productivity toolsproject managementproject management toolproject planningproject scheduling • scheduling software • scheduling systemsoftware tutorialvideo tutorial

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2012

Welcome to the Era of Design

"All businesses, no matter what they make or sell, should recognize the power and financial value of good design.

Obviously, there are many different types of design: graphic, brand, packaging, product, process, interior, interaction/user experience, Web and service design, to name but a few. ...

You see, expecting great design is no longer the preserve of a picky design–obsessed urban elite – that aesthetically sensitive clique who'd never dare leave the house without their Philippe Starck eyewear and turtleneck sweaters and buy only the right kind of Scandinavian furniture. Instead, there's a new, mass expectation of good design: that products and services will be better thought through, simplified, made more intuitive, elegant and more enjoyable to use.

Design has finally become democratized, and we marketers find ourselves with new standards to meet in this new 'era of design.' To illustrate, Apple, the epitome of a design–led organization, now has a market capitalization of $570 billion, larger than the GDP of Switzerland. Its revenue is double Microsoft's, a similar type of technology organization but one not truly led by design (just compare Microsoft Windows with Apple's Lion operating system)."

(Adam Swann, 5/03/2012, Forbes)

Fig.1 "Mille Miglia" bicycle by VIVA [http://www.vivabikes.com/].

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advertisingaestheticsAmazon.comApple • Apple Care • applied discipline • B2Bbrandbrandingbrandsbusiness • business to business • CMO Network • competitive advantagecreativity • customer recommendation • customer satisfaction • customer-centric • customersdesign • design-led organisation • elegant design • employee satisfaction • enjoyable to use • era of design • experience design • feel good • financial value • First Direct • Forbesgood designgraphic designhyperconnectedIKEAinnovative designinteraction designinterior designintuitive designleadership • led by design • marketer • marketingmeaningful experiences • Michael Eisner • MicrosoftMicrosoft Windows • new era • new standardsoperating systempackagingPhilippe StarckPinterest • process design • product design • rewarding experiences • service design • service touchpoints • social media • social-media-fueled society • Switzerland • urban elite • user experience designweb design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2012

Beta blockers? : proprietary data formats may be legally defensible but open standards can be a better spur for innovation

"Thomson [Thomson Reuters] makes the proprietary bibliography software EndNote, and claims that Zotero is causing its commercial business 'irreparable harm' and is wilfully and intentionally destroying Thomson's customer base. In particular, Thomson is demanding that GMU stop distributing the newer beta–version of Zotero that allegedly allows EndNote's proprietary data format for storing journal citation styles to be converted into an open–standard format readable by Zotero and other software. Thomson claims that Zotero 'reverse engineered or decompiled' not only the format, but also the EndNote software itself. ...

Litigation, which may go to a jury trial, is pending, so judging this case on its legal merits would be premature. But on a more general level, the virtues of interoperability and easy data–sharing among researchers are worth restating. Imagine if Microsoft Word or Excel files could be opened and saved only in these proprietary formats, for example. It would be impossible for OpenOffice and other such software to read and save these files using open standards – as they can legally do.

Competition between open–source and proprietary software is long–running, as personified by the struggle between Windows and Linux for desktop and server operating systems, but also in many branches of software used by scientists. Researchers tend to lean towards open sharing, but they will also pay for added–value features, and it's important that the playing field is level. Ultimately, the customer is king."

(Nature, p.708)

Nature Volume 455, p.708 (9 October 2008) | doi:10.1038/455708a; Published online 8 October 2008, Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited.

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2006 • added-value features • authorshipbibliography softwareCenter for History and New MediacitationcopyrightDan Cohen • data format • digital informationEndNoteGeorge Mason Universityinteroperabilityknowledge integrationlawsuitlevel playing fieldLinuxMicrosoft ExcelMicrosoft WindowsMicrosoft WordNature (journal) • open sharing • open sourceopen source filesopen source software • open standard format • open standards • OpenOffice • operating systemorganise and share • OS • ownershipproprietary • proprietary data formats • proprietary formats • proprietary software • researchersreverse engineering • science news • science policy • Sean Takatssoftwaretechnology • Thomson Reuters • trademark infringment • Zotero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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