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Which clippings match 'Metatheatricality' keyword pg.1 of 1
22 NOVEMBER 2012

Louvre chase scene with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Elmer Fudd

Extract from "Looney Tunes: Back in Action" (2003)

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TAGS

2003 • A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (1884) • art gallerybreaking the fourth wall • Bugs Bunny • cartoon characterschase sceneDaffy DuckEdvard Munch • Elmer Fudd • extradiegeticGeorges Seurat • Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec • humourintertextuality • Jerry Goldsmith • Looney TunesLouvremetatheatricality • moulin rouge • Moulin Rouge La Goulue (1891) • paint by numbers • paintingspointillismremediationSalvador Dalisurrealist style • The Persistence of Memory (1931) • The Scream (1893)world of the image

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2011

The Greeting is a film which pretends to be a painting

Bill "Viola's The Greeting is pretending to be a picture, hanging on the wall of the National Gallery, as part of 'The Passions' exhibition in 2003. The context of the gallery space and the badging of The Greeting as a picture give the work something different, making it more than just a film. The significance is in the context of where it is shown and the pretence occurring that this is a picture. Indeed, when walking downstairs in the National Gallery towards 'The Passions' exhibition, it is seeing it hanging on the wall that strikes immediately; I am being invited to believe that this animated film is pretending to be a picture. The analogy is of the picture becoming an actor, pretending to be something else. In terms of form, The Greeting is a film. Therefore, what is it that makes it now defined as an exhibition, a part of Viola's 'The Passions' in 2003? It is only the fact that it's part of a gallery that makes it an exhibition, although in reality it is also actors directed by a video artist into this film, slowed down and with no sound, which is pretending to be a painting. Therefore, it is conceptual art, in that what the artist is doing is not just making a painting, or having the idea for a painting, but having the idea of where it should be staged. The inscribed text of the space in which it is viewed makes a difference to what the viewer or spectator sees, and what is going on."

(Alison Oddey, 2007, p.70)

3). Alison Oddey (2007). "Re–Framing". In: "Re–Framing the Theatrical", Palgrave Macmillan. 1–21.

Fig.1 Bill Viola (1995). "The Greeting".
Fig.2 Jacopo Carucci da Pontormo "The Visitation".

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TAGS

2003actorsallusionart historyartistartistic experience • Bill Viola • conceptual artcontextexhibitionfigurationfilmgallery • gallery space • hanging on the wall • homage • inscribed text of the space • interdisciplinaryliving picturesmetatheatricalityNational Gallerypainting • Passions (exhibition) • performancepicturepretence • pretending • pretending to be a painting • re-framing • reenactmentreflexive foregroundingremediationspacespectatorspectatorship • staged • stagingtableau vivant • The Greeting • The Passions • the role of the spectator • the viewer • theatre-art • theatricaltime slowed downvideo artvideo artistviewer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

La ricotta di Pier Paolo Pasolini

"L'opera a cui sto facendo riferimento è La ricotta, un mediometraggio di Pier Paolo Pasolini datato 1963 ed inserito all'interno del film ad episodi Rogopag – Laviamoci il cervello.

La pellicola di Pasolini descrive alcune fasi della lavorazione di un film sulla passione di Cristo: ci troviamo dunque in ambito metacinematografico: un film in cui si parla di un film. "

(Michele Cecchini)

1). Paolo Pasolini (1963). 'La ricotta'

2). 'Tableaux vivants', http://www.mediastudies.it

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1963cinema • Deposizione dalla Croce • Giovanni Battista di Jacopo • Jesus Christ • La ricotta • metacinematografico • metatheatricalityPaolo Pasolinipassion of Christreconstruction • Ro.Go.Pa.G • RoGoPaG • Rosso Fiorentino • social criticism • tableau vivantwork of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2011

Mise en Abyme: the mirror in the text

"In a work of art, I rather like to find thus transposed, at the level of the characters, the subject of the work itself. Nothing sheds more light on the work or displays the proportions of the whole work more accurately. Thus, in paintings by Memling or Quentin Metzys, a small dark convex mirror reflects, in its turn, the interior of the room in which the action of the painting takes place. Thus, in a slightly different way, in Velasquez's Las Meninas. Finally, in literature, there is the scene in which a play is acted in Hamlet; this also happens in many other plays. In Wilhelm Meister, there are the puppet shows and the festivities in the castle. In Fall of the House of Usher, there is the piece that is read to Roderick, etc. None of these examples is absolutely accurate. What would be more accurate, and what would explain better what I'd wanted to do in my Cabiers, in Narcisse and La Tentative, would be a comparison with the device from heraldry that involves putting a second representation of the original shield 'en abyme' within it."

(Lucien Dällenbach, 1977 via Once I Metablog on Metafiction)

Dällenbach, Lucien (1977). 'The Mirror in the Text'. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Fig.1 Diego Velázquez 'Las Meninas'

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1656 • Andre Gide • Diego Velazquez • Fall of the House of Usher • Hamlet • Hans Memling • heraldic shield • heraldry • infinite regressionintertextualityLas Meninasmeta-painting • metablog • metafiction • metaplay • metatheatre • metatheatricalitymirrormise-en-abyme • Quentin Metzys • recursionreflexivityrepetitionrepresentation • Wilhelm Meister • William Shakespearework of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2009

Re-constructing the Raft of the Medusa

Fig.1 Théodore Géricault, Le Radeau de la Méduse, 1818–19

Fig.2 Bruce High Quality, Raft of the Medusa, 2007

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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