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31 MARCH 2015

Analysis of Human Flesh Search in the Taiwanese Context

"The advancement of internet technologies and the rapid rise of virtual communities have instigated internet human flesh search (HFS) or cyber manhunt in western countries [3] [4] that it has become a cyber phenomenon. HFS originated in China. The term was translated from 人肉搜尋 (Ren Rou Sou Suo [5]) which broadly refers to “an act of searching information about individuals or any subjects through the online collaboration of multiple users” [6].

Participation and collaboration by users play a vital role in the HFS process. On one hand, HFS practices, which are considered a manifestation of citizen empowerment and civil participation, are supported and applauded by other countries. On the other, majority of high-profile HFS cases in China have become aggressive and vicious, arousing research interest on the involved legal [3], privacy [7], and social issues [4].

Although Chen and Sharma [1] provide a comprehensive review of HFS that is supplemented by Chao [2], there is still a gap in research and in the analysis of HFS on a global context. The Taiwanese context is worthy of review because despite the abundance of HFS incidents occurring in the country, few studies on those have been shared to the international community."

(Yu-Hui Tao, Chian-Hsueng Chao, 2011)

Tao, Y.-H. and Chao, C.-S., Analysis of human flesh search in the Taiwanese context, in proceeding of the 2nd International Conference on Innovations in Bio-inspired Computing and Applications, December 16-18, Shenzhen, China, 2011

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

Human Flesh Search (HFS)

"This article studies an interesting Internet phenomenon known as Human Flesh Search which illustrates the far-reaching impacts of the Internet that is less documented. Due to its huge threat on individual privacy, human flesh search has introduced huge controversy and invited heated debate in China. This paper reviews its growth, explores the impetuses, identifies the distinctions from the alternative search engines, and summarizes the benefits and drawbacks. Furthermore, the paper develops a systematic review of the prior literature in human flesh search by surveying major sources such as academic journals, national and international conferences, and public and private databases. Finally, the paper identifies five research gaps in the literature and offers an initial interpretation and analysis of these remaining research issues. Human flesh search is still growing and the current study helps the computing field learn the past and present of this emerging phenomenon and properly manage its future development."

(Rui Chen and Sushil Sharma, 2011)

Rui Chen and Sushil Sharma (2011). Journal of Information Privacy and Security, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2011, pages 50-71.

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TAGS

20012011abuse • alternative search engines • breaching anonymity • breaching confidentiality • broadcasting personally identifiable information • committing an offense • controversycrowdsourcingcultural codescultural normscyber vigilantismcyberbullying • cyberposse • cyberpsychologydeath threats • denial-of-service attack • digilantism • distributed researching • DoS attack • doxing • doxxing • emerging phenomenon • etiquette • exposing corruption • exposing fraud • falsehoodgossipharassment • HFSE • Human Flesh Search (HFS) • human flesh search engine • identifying people • illegal access • individual privacy • information about specific individuals • information about specific organisations • information accuracy • information privacyinformation reliabilityinformation sharing • Internet phenomenon • Internet-based practice • massive human collaboration • monitoring • netizen • normsonline activismpanopticonpeople-powered searchPeoples Republic of Chinapublic humiliationpublic shamingpunishment • research gaps • research issues • revealing classified informationrevealing private informationRui Chensearch engines • social breach online • social controlsocial normssurveillanceSushil Sharmasystematic review • unofficial information • vigilante reactions • vigilantismviolation • vitrio

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2011

Returning to Michael Powell's Peeping Tom after 15 years

"Peeping Tom has been widely celebrated as one of the great films about looking, about consumption, about cinema, about art, about the artist, about the relation between the artist, the artwork and the audience, about the relation between looking and pleasure, looking and desire, looking and death, and so on. All very familiar stuff from Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis and film studies (the film's tailor–made for film studies – bring in some Freud here, some Bataille and de Sade there, add a little Lacan and Virillio, etc). The aggressive and violating camera, as Scorsese put it. And this is partly the problem with Peeping Tom. Like the films of Peter Greenaway or David Cronenberg, Peeping Tom is more like an academic essay about voyeurism and scopophilia, a join–the–dots lecture on the pleasures, risks and dangers of art. Plus, Peeping Tom employs the most stereotypical, cliched thriller/ murder mystery plot you can imagine: a young man, a loner, a misfit, introspective, morbid, an outsider figure, abused as a child, etc etc etc, who murders sexualized women (prostitutes and actresses), and is befriended by an innocent he cannot bring himself to corrupt or kill.

Powell attacks the subject of voyeurism and murder aggressively in the opening scenes: the close–ups on cameras, projectors and eyes, the mirrors and reflections, exaggerated sounds (the rattle of a projector, a dripping tap, a heartbeat, whispered voiceover), and his love of visual rhymes and puns (eyes, drinks, sticks and tripods). You can see Powell having a ball in orchestrating his elaborate camera moves, his erotic, sleazy mise–en–abyme, his film–within–a–film tropes (Powell playing the murderer's father and torturer in home movies which he shot himself), the multiple reflections, mirrors, lenses, cameras, projections and screens (every shot in Peeping Tom seems to have been lit by a raking, unfiltered, unflattering horizontal light). It's not that Powell isn't at the top of his game in Peeping Tom – in its way, Peeping Tom is every bit as inventive as Powell's best work – it's that the plot, the characters, the situations are so cheesy, predictable, and shallow.

Despite all this, though, Peeping Tom does have bite and a nastiness which age hasn't dimmed. Peeping Tom also still feels 'contemporary' in its psychoanalytic treatment of a serial killer plot which draws on prostitution, cinema, acting, and pornography. And the conceit of having a murder in the opening shots which's replayed a moment later over the credits is a tour–de–force (one of the film's best cinematic ideas, this says everything necessary, and economically, in the first five minutes)."

(Jeremy Robinson)

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TAGS

1960abuseaggressionartartistartworkaudienceBritish directorBritish film directorcameracinemaclicheclose-upconsumptionDavid Cronenbergdeathdesire • Emeric Pressburger • erotic • essayfilmfilm studies • film-within-a-film • Freudian • Georges Bataille • innocenceintrospectionJacques Lacan • join-the-dots • Leo Marks • loner • looking • Marquis de Sade • Martin ScorseseMichael Powellmirrormise-en-abymemisfitmorbidmurdermurder mysteryoutsider • Paul Virilio • Peeping Tom (film) • Peter Greenawaypleasurepornographyprojectorprostitutionpsychoanalysis • pun • reflectionscopophilia • scoptophilia • serial killer • sexualised • sleazy • stereotypethrillerUKviolation • visual rhyme • voyeurism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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