Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Mise-en-abyme' keyword pg.1 of 2
02 JANUARY 2014

Alan Becker's Animator vs Animation series

"Animator vs. Animation plays with the idea that the little stick figures that you animate can fight back and do damage to your computer. Since the world of computers is so vast, the possibility for gags is endless. I've had the stick figure engage in matrix style fighting with all the icons on the desktop, a one–on–one duel with Clippy (the old Microsoft Word Assistant), a solitaire fight with another stick figure using cards, the list goes on."

(Alan Becker)

1
2
3
4

TAGS

Adobe Flash • Alan Becker • animated episodesanimationanimator as creator • Animator vs Animation • chase scene • Clippy (Microsoft Word Assistant) • duelepisodesfightfight backfight sequenceFlash animation • Microsoft Word Assistant • mise-en-abymemultiple media chase scenenaively drawn figuresone-on-oneparodyremediationsilly web video • solitaire • stick figurestick man • story within a story • The Matrix (1999)web graphicsweb vernacularwebisode

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 DECEMBER 2013

Under Scan: interactive video art installation for public space

"Under Scan is an interactive video art installation for public space. In the work, passers–by are detected by a computerized tracking system, which activates video–portraits projected within their shadow. Over one thousand video–portraits of volunteers were taken in Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton and Nottingham by a team of local filmmakers. For its London presentation in Trafalgar Square, Tate Modern filmed over 250 additional recordings. As people were free to portray themselves in whatever way they desired, a wide range of performances were captured. In the installation, the portraits appear at random locations. They 'wake–up' and establish eye contact with a viewer as soon as his or her shadow 'reveals' them. As the viewer walks away, the portrait reacts by looking away, and eventually disappears if no one activates it. ...

The piece was inspired by representation en abîme, where the portrayed make eye–contact with the viewer, – as found in works by Jan Van Eyck, Parmigianino, Velázquez or Leon Golub. Other references for this work include the post–photographic device described in La invención de Morel, written by Adolfo Bioy Casares (1940) and the ghostly portraits created by Gary Hill, Lynn Hershman–Leeson, Paul Sermon and Luc Courchesne."

(Rafael Lozano–Hemmer)

1
2

TAGS

2005 • Adolfo Bioy Casares • art installation • Bajo Reconocimiento • computerised surveillance system • DerbyDiego Velazquezeye contactfilming people • Francesco Mazzola • Gary Hill • ghostly portraits • ghosts • Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola • immersive experienceimmersive videointeractive installationinteractive video • interactive video art installation • Jan Van Eyck • La invencion de Morel • Leicester • Leon Golub • light installation • Lincoln • living picturesLuc Courchesne • Lynn Hershman-Leeson • mise-en-abyme • Morels Invention • Northampton • Nottingham • Pani 12kW projector • Parmigianino • Parmigiano • passer-by • Paul Sermon • post-photographic device • projection artprojection workspublic spaceRafael Lozano-Hemmer • representation en abime • robotic projectors • scissor lift • shadowTate Modern • The Invention of Morel • tracking system • Trafalgar Square • Under Scan (2005) • video artworkvideo portraitvideo projectionvideo projection worksvideo trackingwatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

A Game with No Rules: rear projected Kiwi short film melodrama

"A trio of future Kiwi screen stars smoke, smoulder, steal – and worse – in Scott Reynolds' serpentine short noir. Kane (Marton Csokas) and his Zambesi–clad woman on the side (Danielle Cormack) set about ripping off Kane's rich wife (Jennifer Ward–Lealand) with bloody results. Writer/director Scott Reynolds and longtime partner in crime, cinematographer Simon Raby, serve notice of their talents – and inspirations – with heady lighting, deliberately shonky back projection, and opening titles right out of Hitchcock [Saul Bass inspired]. Muso Greg Johnson supplies the horns."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig.1 Scott Reynolds/Zee Films (1994), "A Game with No Rules" Aotearoa New Zealand, 35mm 16 minutes.

1
2

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2011

Wolfenstein 3D: Pac-Man intragame

"An intragame is a game within the game, e.g. the Pachinko machine in Duke Nukem 3D [or a Pac–Man level in Wolfenstein 3D]. Since computer games are based on simulator technology that could mix or include any other game in addition to the main game, the main game will be the only one classified."

(Aarseth, Smedstad and Sunnanå, 2003, p.49)

1). Video capture of secret Pac–Man level within Episode 3 of Wolfenstein 3D.

2). Table of Contents for Level Up: Digital Games Research Conference Proceedings, DiGRA and Utrecht University

3). Espen Aarseth, Solveig Marie Smedstad and Lise Sunnanå (2003). 'A multi–dimensional typology of games', in Copier, Marinka; Raessens, Joost, Level Up: Digital Games Research Conference Proceedings, DiGRA and Utrecht University

1

TAGS

19923Daction hero • Adrian Carmack • Apogee SoftwareCastle Wolfensteincomputer gamesdigital cultureDiGRADuke Nukem 3Deaster eggEspen Aarsethfirst-person point of viewfirst-person shooterFPS • game genres • game within the game • gameplaygames • id Software • intragame • Lise Sunnana • mise-en-abymeNaziPac-Man • Pachinko • PC gamesreflexivityrun and gunScott Miller • shareware • Solveig Marie Smedstad • tribute • typology of games • video gamevirtual environmentsWolfenstein 3D

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2011

Mise en Abyme: the mirror in the text

"In a work of art, I rather like to find thus transposed, at the level of the characters, the subject of the work itself. Nothing sheds more light on the work or displays the proportions of the whole work more accurately. Thus, in paintings by Memling or Quentin Metzys, a small dark convex mirror reflects, in its turn, the interior of the room in which the action of the painting takes place. Thus, in a slightly different way, in Velasquez's Las Meninas. Finally, in literature, there is the scene in which a play is acted in Hamlet; this also happens in many other plays. In Wilhelm Meister, there are the puppet shows and the festivities in the castle. In Fall of the House of Usher, there is the piece that is read to Roderick, etc. None of these examples is absolutely accurate. What would be more accurate, and what would explain better what I'd wanted to do in my Cabiers, in Narcisse and La Tentative, would be a comparison with the device from heraldry that involves putting a second representation of the original shield 'en abyme' within it."

(Lucien Dällenbach, 1977 via Once I Metablog on Metafiction)

Dällenbach, Lucien (1977). 'The Mirror in the Text'. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Fig.1 Diego Velázquez 'Las Meninas'

1

TAGS

1656 • Andre Gide • Diego Velazquez • Fall of the House of Usher • Hamlet • Hans Memling • heraldic shield • heraldry • infinite regressionintertextualityLas Meninasmeta-painting • metablog • metafiction • metaplay • metatheatre • metatheatricalitymirrormise-en-abyme • Quentin Metzys • recursionreflexivityrepetitionrepresentation • Wilhelm Meister • William Shakespearework of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.