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Which clippings match 'Innocence' keyword pg.1 of 2
05 OCTOBER 2014

Feb. 8, 1996: We (Mostly) Celebrate 24 Hours in Cyberspace

"24 Hours in Cyberspace was the inspiration of photographer Rick Smolan, who created the 'Day in the Life' photo-essay series. Smolan used the same formula as 'Day in the Life,' recruiting 150 photojournalists to go out and chronicle a slice of everyday life, in this case as it pertained to the then-counterculturish phenomenon of the web.

The technology of the internet was not the subject: Smolan wanted (and got) pictures of how different people in different cultures were using the internet, and the effect that the medium of cyberspace was having on their lives.

The resulting work was edited and then displayed on a website. It also appeared as the cover story of that week's edition of U.S. News and World Report and, soon thereafter, as a coffee-table book."

(Wired.com, 8 February 2008)

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1996 • 24 hours • 24 Hours in Cyberspace (1996) • 8 February 1996 • a single day • book • coffee-table book • cyberspacedaily lifeday in the life • digital time capsule • glimpse • influence of the web • innocence • lives touched by the web • photographer • photographers around the world • random collection • Rick Smolan • single day on the internet • time capsule • visually capture • webWired (magazine)world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JULY 2014

Teenage subculture identities discussed in 1979 on UK youth TV programme Something Else

"In this edition from Birmingham, the Coventry band the Specials had just finished playing and George is sitting beside Martin Degville, just in front of Jane Kahn, partner in the seminal outrage shop Kahn & Bell."

(David Johnson, 28 June 2010)

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1970s197970s televisionaggression • BBC Community Programmes • BBC TVBBC2Birmingham • Boy George • British televisionclothescounterculturecultural codescultural normscultural signalsdisaffected youthdressing upfashionfashionable fad • fighting • George ODowd • identity performanceimpression managementinnocence • Jane Kahn • Kahn and Bell • magazine programme • make-up • Martin Degville • naivety • new romantics • prejudicepunk rock • punks • rebellionsocial norms • Something Else (TV series) • street fashionsubcultureteddy boyteenage rebellionteenager • The Specials • urban clothingyouth culture • youth culture magazine programme • youth subculture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Decoding BMW's You Know You Are Not The First

"The young woman's flawless skin is emphasizing the societal view of how perfection is what is considered beautiful and ideal. Her skin doesn't have a single blemish bruise, bump, or scar on it. Her makeup is very subtle and her cheeks have a slight rosy glow to them, giving her a very youthful appearance. The lack of jewelry is also making her look younger and more innocent and it is putting the focus solely on her bare flawless skin, this flawlessness is likely representing what one would get if they purchase one of their premium selection used BMW's, spotlessness in paint and interior.

Although BMW engages this image of innocence and flawlessness, there also appears to be a significant sexual message in this ad because the initial 'Innocent' image dissolves as you skim down the ad and see how the young woman's eye contact is directly with the camera, and it looks as if she is looking right into your eyes with a seductive expression. Her mouth also get a lot of attention as it appears to be slightly open, drawing your attention right to her full lips, 'open lips are used to suggest sexual excitement or passion'"

(Sonia Sidhu, 10 June 2012)

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2008advertising campaignArthur Berger • atypical • blondeBMWbranded commodities • car company • constructed meaningcultural normsdepictions of womeneye contact • flawlessness • Germanglobalisation of aspirationGreece • hair colour • innocenceinterpretation • media analysis • media criticismmedia textmouth • olive skin • paradigmatic analysis • partially unclothedperfection • print advertisement • seduction • semiotic approach • semioticssex objectsexual agency • sexual excitement • signification • skin tone • suggestive narratives • syntagmatic analysis • textual analysis • used car • virginity • visual symbolism • young woman • young women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MARCH 2013

Dorothy Iannone's Innocent and Aware

Dorothy Iannone, "Innocent and Aware", 8 March 2013 – 5 May 2013, Camden Arts Centre in London.

"Iannone's portrayals of male and female sexuality celebrate the joy of her most intimate relationships while subverting traditional gender stereotypes of dominance and control. Through graphic paintings, sculptures and video boxes her works depict partly–clothed and naked figures on bright psychedelic backgrounds of flora, mandalas and biomorphic patterns. Recalling classical Indian erotic art, Egyptian frescoes and Byzantine mosaics, Iannone's intricate work communicates a personal narrative, passionate love affairs and lifetime pursuit of 'ecstatic unity' through transcendence and spirituality."

(Camden Arts Centre, 2013)

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201320th century artartistbiomorphic • biomorphic patterns • ByzantineCamden Arts Centrecontroldominance • Dorothy Iannone • ecstasy • ecstatic unity • erotic artexhibitionexplicit sexual imageryfemale artistfemale sexuality • fresco • gender representationgender stereotypesgenitals • graphic paintings • innocenceintimacyintimate sexuality • love affair • lovemaking • mandala • mosaicnaive stylenaively drawn figuresnaked figuresNorth American artistpenispersonal narrativephysical lovepsychedelicpsychedelic imageryself-taughtsex • sexual liberation • sexual politicssexualityshock artspectacle • spiritual awareness • spiritualitytranscendence • unconditional love • vagina • video box • vulvawomen artistswomen in art and design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JANUARY 2013

The Last Picture Show: ode to a Texan small town

"It's hard to overestimate the influence of Peter Bogdanovich's The Last Picture Show (1971) ... on all those other elegiac movies about lost youth and crumbling dreams in small American towns that followed it in such huge numbers. We know the storylines, which never vary much. Boy meets girl. They fall in love and think their relationship will last forever but war/adulthood/pregnancy intervenes. Old school friends spend a last summer of high jinks together. They vow eternal loyalty to one another but then the autumn rolls in and their lives drag them off in very different directions. The visual clichés are familiar, too: by the final reel, the once teeming street is empty, with wind blowing the dust, or the old café where the friends used to meet is boarded up. ...

When Bogdanovich revisited Thalia with a belated sequel, Texasville, in 1990, the results were mixed at best. What had made the original so distinctive was the youth of the characters played by Shepherd, Bottoms and Bridges – their curiosity, innocence and their sense of yearning. Witnessing their travails in middle age simply didn't have the same impact. The real follow–up to The Last Picture Show wasn't Texasville but the films that were made – and are still being made today – in its mould."

(The Independent, 18 March 2011)

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1971adolescence • American Graffiti (1973) • Archer City • arthouse cinema • Big Wednesday (1978) • black and white • broken dreams • Cloris Leachman • coming of age • crumbling dreams • Cybill Shepherd • Diner (1982) • Easy Rider (1969) • Eileen Brennan • femme fatale • football coach • Hank Williams • high school • illicit relationship • innocenceintrospectionJeff Bridges • juvenile • Korean War • Larry McMurtry • lost youth • nakedPeter Bogdanovich • pool hall • provincial town • rites of passage • roughhouse • Rumble Fish (1983) • Sam Bottoms • self-conscious • sense of yearning • sexsmall townsmall town America • sombre • soulful • Stand By Me (1986) • swimming • teenage temptress • teenagersTexas • Texasville (1990) • Thalia • The Last Picture Show (1971) • The Outsiders (1983) • Timothy Bottoms • would-be rebel • youth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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