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27 MARCH 2012

AHRC Impact Case Studies: demonstrating the value of research through the influence on the wider public discourse

"In recent years there has been mounting concern to understand the distribution, utility and influence of research findings in non–academic contexts. This concern originates in part from political imperatives to demonstrate public value, for research to move towards pragmatic considerations in wider public discourse, in cultural, industry and policy environments.

All UK Research Councils are expected to be able to demonstrate the wider impact and value of academic research. The important question that we must seek to address is: what is the contribution of arts and humanities research to society? Or, what is the impact or influence of arts and humanities research outside the academy?

The Arts and Humanities Research Council has commissioned a series of case studies to investigate the impact of arts and humanities research. Across the series as a whole, impact has been defined in its broadest sense to include economic, social and cultural elements. The case studies included in this publication focus on the social impact of two artist exhibitions, specifically concentrating on visitor responses and reactions.

Established in April 2005, the Arts and Humanities Research Council provides funding for a range of UK wide programmes, supporting the highest quality research and postgraduate training in the arts and humanities."

(Arts and Humanities Research Council UK)

2). Social Impact of Artist Exhibitions: Two Case Studies

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TAGS

2005academic researchacademyAHRC • artist exhibition • arts and humanities • arts and humanities research • case studiescontribution to societycultural impactdemonstrable value • economic impact • funded researchgovernment policyimpact case studiesimpact of researchimpact on societyimpact on the economy • influence • knowledge integration • non-academic contexts • perceived value • performativity • political imperatives • postgraduate trainingpragmatic considerationspublic value • publicly funded • REF • research council • research findingsresearch outputsresearch publication • research quality • significancesocial impact • taxpayers • UK • utility of research • value • visitor responses • wider impact • wider public discourse

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MARCH 2011

General Practice Notebook: an online medical encyclopaedia

"GPnotebook is a concise synopsis of the entire field of clinical medicine focussed on the needs of the General Practitioner.

The database is continually being updated by a team of authors. We take a pragmatic approach to authoring: we look out for topical issues, keep track of the journals and update material in response to user feedback.

We use a range of knowledge sources, including clinical experience, knowledge taken from literature reviews, original research articles and guidelines published by national and international bodies. In many cases references are made to sources of information; we are committed to making GPnotebook fully referenced in the near future. As a team we review each other's work but we also rely in the feedback from experts in primary care and the various clinical specialities to keep us on the right track.

Our editorial decisions are based on merit and are not influenced by any funding bodies.

We make every effort to ensure that the contents of the site are correct however we cannot be held responsible for any errors or ommissions."

(Oxbridge Solutions Ltd., UK)

TAGS

body • clinical • clinical medicinedatabasediagnosisdiseasedoctorencyclopaediaexpert knowledge • general practitioner • GP • GP Notebook • guidelineshealthhuman patientsillnessinformationinjuryknowledge baseknowledge repositorymedicalmedical practice • medical reference • medical researchnotebook • online encyclopaedia • operationpainpractitioner • prevention • primary care • prognosis • public healthreferencerepositoryresearch findingssearchsearch enginesexual healthsufferingtherapytreatmentUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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