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Which clippings match 'Jean-Luc Godard' keyword pg.1 of 5
08 OCTOBER 2017

Heinrich Wölfflin's planimetric composition in films

"The 1960s saw the development of an opposite approach, what we might call the telephoto aesthetic. Improvements in long focal-length lenses, encouraged by the growing use of location shooting, led to a very different sort of imagery. Instead of exaggerating the distances between foreground and background, long lenses tend to reduce them, making figures quite far apart seem close in size. (In shooting a baseball game for television, the telephoto lens positioned behind the catcher presents catcher, batter, and pitcher as oddly close to one another.) Planes seem to be stacked or pushed together in a way that seems to make the space 'flatter,' the objects and figures more like cardboard cutouts."

(David Bordwell, 2005)

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Buster Keaton • cardboardy space • cinematographyDavid Bordwellflat picture planeflat space • flatter-looking space • frame stacking • Heinrich Wolfflin • imageryJean-Luc Godard • less voluminous • long lenses • Michelangelo Antonioni • planar composition • planimetric composition • rectangular geometry • stacking • telephoto shot • wide-angle lenses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 FEBRUARY 2017

Jean-Luc Godard's first film: Une Femme Coquette (1955)

"The film, based on a Guy De Maupassant short story, was Godard's first shot at a narrative. It's often listed as lost by biographers, and the find is tremendously significant for French New Wave enthusiasts. There are also several easter eggs in the work for Godard fans: the director cameos two minutes in, the story is later re-adapted in Godard's 1966 film 'Masculin Féminin,' and the work itself is credited to his film-critic pseudonym, Hans Lucas.

Just five years after shooting 'Une Femme Coquette,' Godard would release his early masterpiece, 'Breathless.' There is so much of the energy of that latter work in this earlier vision, shot on a borrowed 16mm camera."

(William Earl, 18 February 2017, Indiewire)

TAGS

1955 • A Flirtatious Woman (1955) • based on novel • black and white • Carmen Mirando • coquette • early work • flirtatious • French filmmaker • French New Wave • French-Swiss film director • Genevagesture • Guy de Maupassant • Hans Lucas • Ile Rousseau • imitation of an actioninfluential filmmakerJean-Luc Godard • Le Signe (Guy de Maupassant) • Maria Lysandre • non-sync sound • prostitute • Roland Tolmatchoff • short fiction film • short film • Swiss filmmaker • Switzerland • The Signal (Guy de Maupassant) • Une Femme Coquette (1955) • voice-over commentarywoman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2014

Sympathy for the Devil (One + One)

"This is one of those rare and unsettling examples of a rock film which has the all the immediacy of reportage from a distant war–zone. The terrain is Olympic Studios in London in June 1968, where the Rolling Stones, recovering from the critical mauling of At Their Satanic Majesty's Request, are at work on the tracks that would become Beggars' Banquet. The film–maker was Jean–Luc Godard, at the height of his reputation as Europe's most daring director. Godard had briefly left Paris for London in the wake of the Paris riots of May '68 with the aim of making a film about art, power and revolution. The Stones, at their most dazzling and Luciferian, were, as Godard saw it, perfect for the role of agents of anarchy in a movie whose stated aim was to 'subvert, ruin and destroy all civilised values'. ...

As the track is worked and reworked, we glimpse the inner dynamics of the Stones. Bill Wyman and Brian Jones are on the margins (Jones spends most of the film shuttered away, ostracised, playing an inaudible and irrelevant acoustic guitar). Charlie Watts is every inch the dapper jazz mod, as spare with his incisive drumming as he is meticulous with his clothes. Jagger is languid, bored and then sexually ambiguous and cruel, coming only properly to life when he sings the lyrics. Most compelling of all is Keith, changing rhythms and cues at will, eyes gleaming, restless and fiercely intelligent, a million miles from the stoned zombie of legend. When he choreographs and leads the band and acolytes (including the witchy Anita Pallenberg) into the 'whoo, whoos' that make the track so malicious, it is sinister and stunning."

(Andrew Hussey, 21 May 2006, The Guardian)

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1960s1968 • agents of anarchy • Anita Pallenberg • Beggars Banquet (1968) • Bill Wyman • Black Panthers • bloodied corpse • bluesy grind • bookseller • Brian Jones • car park • Charlie Watts • Dave Mason • first-person narrative • jazz mod • Jean-Luc Godard • Jimmy Miller • JLG • Keith Richards • languid • left-wing idealsleftwing activistLondon • Lucifer • Maoist hippies • Mein Kampf • Mick Jagger • music documentarymusic recording • music studio • Nicky Hopkins • Olympic Studios London • One Plus One Sympathy for the Devil (1968) • Paris May 1968 • radical chic • recording artistsrecording sessionrecording studioreportage • Ric Grech • rock musicrockumentary • Rocky Dijon • samba • sexually ambiguous • sixtiessixties cool • studio scene • The GuardianThe Rolling Stones • urban guerrilla • Watts Street Gospel Choir

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 SEPTEMBER 2014

Jean-Luc Godard's Critical Appropriation of Graphic Design

"The films of Jean–Luc Godard have been written about perhaps more than any other cinematic works, often through the lens of cultural theory, but not nearly enough attention has been paid to the role of designed objects in his films. Collages of art, literature, language, objects, and words, Godard's films have an instant, impactful, graphic quality, but are far from simple pop artifacts. The thesis this presentation derives from, 'Objects to be Read, Words to be Seen: Design and Visual Language in the Films of Jean–Luc Godard 1959–1967,' explores and interprets the role of visual language within the films–title sequences, intertitles, handwritten utterances, and printed matter in the form of newspapers, magazines, and posters.

By examining le graphisme within the cultural context of Paris during the 1960s, this thesis seeks to amplify the significance of graphic design in Godard's first fifteen films, beginning with 1960's À Bout de Souffle (Breathless) and ending with 1967's Weekend. While Godard was not a practicing graphic designer in the traditional sense, he was an amateur de design, an autodidact whose obsession with designed objects, graphic language and print media resulted in the most iconic body of work in 1960s France."

(Laura Forde, 30 April 2010)

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1960s • A Bout de Souffle (1959) • amateur de design • appropriation • autodidact • Breathless (1959) • cinematic visual language • cinematic works • critical appropriationcultural context • cultural theory • design and visual language • design sense • designed objects • designed thingsend titlesFrancegraphic design • graphic language • graphic quality • hand lettering • handwritten utterances • iconic body of work • intertitlesJean-Luc Godard • Laura Forde • le graphisme • magazinesnewspapersParisPierrot le Fou (1965)postersprint media • printed matter • title sequencetitle stillsTwo Or Three Things I Know About Hertypographyvideo lecturevisual languagevisual sensibilityWeekend

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2013

Jefferson Airplane Wakes Up New York; Jean-Luc Godard Captures It

"He took over from the specialists and operated the camera from the window of Leacock–Pennebaker's office on West Forty–fifth street, shooting the band on the roof of the Schuyler Hotel across the street. (Pennebaker recalled him to be an amateurish cameraman who could not avoid the beginner's pitfall of frequent zooming in and out.) The performance took place without a permit, at standard rock volume: as singer Grace Slick later wrote, 'We did it, deciding that the cost of getting out of jail would be less than hiring a publicist"

(via Open Culture, 24 February 2012)

Fig.1 Jean–Luc Godard filmed the band on a rooftop in Midtown Manhattan (December 7, 1968).

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1960s1968 • alternative zeitgeist • amateurish • amateurish cameraman • anti-mastery • band • cinematic zest • Donn A. Pennebaker • Film Socialisme (2010) • focus and zoom • footageFrench New Wave • Grace Slick • improvisationimprovised methodJean-Luc Godard • Jefferson Airplane • Leacock-Pennebaker • live performanceManhattan • Midtown Manhattan • New YorkOpen Culture (resource) • Paul Kantner • Richard Leacock • Schuyler Hotel • spectacle • The House at Pooneil Corners • West Forty-fifth street • zooming in and out

CONTRIBUTOR

David Reid
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