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21 OCTOBER 2012

Rosemarys Baby: editing through frame selection

"Rosemary's Baby is a 1968 American horror film written and directed by Roman Polanski, based on the bestselling 1967 novel by Ira Levin. ... Farrow plays an expecting mother who fears that her husband may have made a pact with their eccentric neighbours, believing he may have promised them the child to be used as a human sacrifice in their occultic rituals in exchange for success in his acting career."

(Zach James and Rich Raddon, Movieclips)

Fig.1 excerpt from "Visions of Light" (1992), Arnold Glassman, Todd McCarthy and Stuart Samuels [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0105764/]

[Jump to 7:54 to see Polanski's skilful use of framing to heighten the audience's interest and sense of intrigue.]

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TAGS

1968 • anagram • apartmentbaby • Charles Grodin • child • cinematic frame • cinematographycompositioncultdemonic presencedevil • door frame • editing through selection • Emmaline Henry • expecting mother • frameframed by the windowframinghorror filmhousewife • human sacrifice • Ira Levin • John Cassavetes • Maurice Evans • Mia Farrow • mise-en-scenemysterious • narrative immersion • neighbour • obscured • obscured viewoccult • occultic ritual • pregnancy • pregnant • psychological horror • Ralph Bellamy • raperitual • Roman Polanski • Rosemary • Rosemarys Baby • Ruth Gordon • satan • Sidney Blackmer • tannis root • Visions of Light (documentary)visual designvisual intriguevisual perspective • William Fraker • window frame • witch • witchcraft

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 OCTOBER 2011

Rabbits: three rabbits live with a fearful mystery

"In a nameless city, deluged by a continuous rain, three rabbits live with a fearful mystery. Rabbits is a 9 episode sitcom featuring Naomi Watts, Laura Elena Harring, and Scott Coffey."

(LynchNet)

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TAGS

2002anthropomorphism • anti-realist aesthetics • apartmentbizarre • continuous rain • daily lifeDavid Lynchdehumanisationdistanced viewpointdistanciation • episodic • hare • humanoid rabbits • in and out • independent cinemaironing • Laura Elena Harring • mise-en-scenemystery • nameless city • Naomi Wattsotherworldlinessplacenessproscenium archrabbit • Rabbits (2002) • scene • Scott Coffey • series of episodes • sitcom • sitting on a couch • solo singing • strangestrangenesssurrealist filmmakertheatrical space • three rabbits • unnatural roomvisual designweird

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2007

September 11, 2001: What We Saw: Frequently Asked Questions

"we've compiled a FAQ to answer common questions: Q. Why did you choose to release the video now? A. We have wanted to release the video for some time, but had not found the appropriate venue. We offered it to a local public television station, but they did not respond. ...

Q. Isn't this video missing important scenes? A. We did not capture the impact of either plane or the start of either building's collapse. As many have surmised, the impacts of the airplanes and collapses of both buildings did catch us by surprise.

Q. Why did you edit this video? A. The version we released on 9–11–2006 was intentionally and obviously (using dissolves) edited for length and size only. About 10 minutes of mostly redundant video was removed. None of the media services could host the unedited file at sufficiently high resolution.

Q. Will you release the unedited version? A. We had intended to, but our plans our on hold at the moment due to time and logistical concerns. We do not feel the high–res version shows anything more than the edited version, and we don't wish to stroke any purient interests. We do not intended to sell or profit from this video in any way. ...

Q. Who shot the video? A. Video was shot by Bri and Bob on a Sony DCR–TRV11 Camcorder. A few days after the tape was shot, we transferred the video to DVD using Apple iMovie and iDVD. The tape and DVD have never left our possession. The released video was transcoded from the DVD. The unedited version was re–transferred from the original tape."

(What We Saw, http://wtcbpc.blogspot.co.uk/)

Fig.1 Bri and Bob (9/11/2006). "September 11, 2001: What We Saw", [transcript from introduction to the video: "5 years ago today, we watched and filmed the attack on the WTC out of the window of home, 36 floors up and 500 yards away from the North Tower. Releasing this tape was a difficult decision for us because of its emotional and personal nature, and the potential for misuse. We feel, however, that our unique perspective has an important historical value, and shows the horror of the day without soundtracks or hype often seen in other accounts. Please be respectful of the contents of this account and be aware some may find the scenes on this video very disturbing. Please share only in its entirety.

We chose Revver to distribute our video because of its artist–friendly licensing terms and support for the Creative Commons. Bob and Bri 9/11/2006"].

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TAGS

20012006 • 41 River Terrace • 9/11 • 911 • aeroplane • airplane • amateur videoapartment • Apple iMovie • Battery Park City North • Bob • Bri • Bri and Bob • building collapse • buildingscrashdebrisdust • edited version • eyewitnessfallingGoogle Video • ground zero • home video • iDVD • impactManhattannews • North Tower • pilot • Revver • September 11September 11 2001September 11 attacksskyscraper • Sony DCR-TRV11 Camcorder • South Tower • tall building • tapeterrorterrorismterrorist attacktowertoxic cloudTwin Towers • unedited file • videovideotapedvideotaped footage • What We Saw • World Trade Center • WTC • YouTube
13 JANUARY 2004

Corporeality is situated in dwelling space: the revolution begins at home

"[Henri] Lefèbvre gives an interpretation of [Satz] Hölderlin's assertion that the 'human being' can only live as a poet. The relationship of the 'human being' to the world, to 'nature', to his desires and corporeality is situated in dwelling space; this is where it realises itself and becomes readable. It is impossible for him to build or to have a home in which he lives, without possessing something that is different from everyday life, that points beyond itself, namely his relationship to potentiality and the imaginary. This desire is encapsulated in even the most destitute hut, the most dreary high–rise apartment in [e.g. kitsch] objects. In objects possessing exactly those qualities that modernism wanted to do away with."

(Park Fiction 1995/98)

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TAGS

apartmentcorporealcultural purposedifferentiationdwellingeverydayeveryday lifeHenri Lefebvrehomehuman beinghumanismhumanistic perspectivehutimaginarykitsch • Marxist humanism • naturepoetprivate space • production of space • reproduction of social relations of production • Satz Holderlin • scriptible spacessituatedsocial space • spatial justice • urban design
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