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Which clippings match 'Noise' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 JULY 2014

Mechnical sound works from commonplace industrial objects

"The sound sculptures and installations of Zimoun are graceful, mechanized works of playful poetry, their structural simplicity opens like an industrial bloom to reveal a complex and intricate series of relationships, an ongoing interplay between the 'artificial' and the 'organic'. It's an artistic research of simple and elegant systems to generate and study complex behaviors in sound and motion. Zimoun creates sound pieces from basic components, often using multiples of the same prepared mechanical elements to examine the creation and degeneration of patterns."

(Statements about Zimoun: Tim Beck http://www.zimoun.net/about.html)

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acoustic hum • artistic research • Bern • cacophony • chaotic forces • commonplace industrial objects • commonplace objects • complex behaviours • elegant systems • functional materials • generative systems • hum • industrial objects • installation artintricacykinetic sculpturekinetic sound sculpture • lifeless matter • mechanical rhythmmechanism • mechnical sound works • minimalist art • minimalist constructions • multiples • noise • ordered system • orderly patternspatternprimitive oscillatorsquasi autonomous creaturesrepetitionrhythm oscillator • rhythmic pattern • robotic artroboticsrule systemsimple rules • sonic chaos • sound and motion • sound artsound artistsound installationsound pieces • sound production • sound sculpture • sound works • structural simplicity • swarm behaviourswarming • synthetic structures • visual chaos • Zimoun

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2014

Organ of Corti (2010-11) an experimental acoustical intervention

"Organ of Corti is an experimental instrument that recycles noise from the environment. It does not make any sound of its own, but rather it attempts to draw our attention to the sounds already present by framing them in a new way. Named after the organ of hearing in the inner ear, it uses the acoustic technology of sonic crystals to accentuate and attenuate frequencies within the broad range of sound present in road traffic or falling water. By recycling surplus sounds from our environment, we hope to challenge expectations of what might constitute a piece of music by adding nothing to the existing soundscape but rather offering new ways of listening to what is already there. This instrument is a device that, for us, rematerializes our experience of sound, inviting us to 'listen to ourselves listen'."

(Frances Crow and David Prior)

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2011 • acoustic properties • acoustical experimentacousticsambient soundarchitectural conjecture • architectural interventions • architectural speculation • David Prior • design research project • experimental acoustical intervention • experimental music • experimental music composition • experimental musical instrumentexperimental soundexploratory projects • Frances Crow • interdisciplinary investigationlandscape futures • Liminal (partnership) • listening • music production • noisenoise pollutionorgan • Organ of Corti • persistence of sound • PRS New Music Award • public sound art • research and consultancy • site-specific interventionssonic artssonic environment • sound and music environments for exhibition • sound artsound artistsound designsound experimentssound performancesound sculpture • sound walk • soundscape • spatialised sound installations • spatialised soundscapes • speculative researchUKurban experienceurban landscapeurban speculationuser paths

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JULY 2013

Audio Foundation: Alt.Music

"Organised by committees in every major city in NZ under the Audio Foundation, Altmusic is an ongoing series of audio events, regularly bringing a vital injection of contemporary and avant–garde sound art from around the world to New Zealand.

As a turning cog in a thriving local audio art culture, Altmusic has, since 2001, offered a concentrated gathering point where New Zealand's audio art and experimental music scenes can cross wires with those from other centres (and other peripheries). At the same time Altmusic gives audiences the opportunity to share space with audio artists at the very pinnacle of their field, and previous years have seen programmes of performers who tour rarely and are highly regarded around the world.

Altmusic is listening with an eclectic breadth across a range of sonic trajectories, with programmes including artists investigating the embodied nature of performance and the place of live media within sound culture and some of the world's most respected pioneers of electronic music.

Altmusic does not offer a unifying framework, into which a genre ('sound art' 'noise' etc) is neatly packed, rather it attempts to disclose an–often clamorous – discursive space, in which ongoing debate as to what comprises an innovative art of sound can be publicly articulated. Aligned to such utterance is the experiential listening space which is the ground where sound art thrives, and where you, as listener, are given a chance, via the live context, to re–imagine spectatorship as participation."

(Sally Ann McIntyre)

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2001 • Alastair Pettitt • Alt.Music • Andrew Clifford • Andrew McMillan • Aotearoa New Zealand • Artspace (NZ) • audio art • audio art culture • audio artists • audio events • Audio Foundation (NZ) • avant-garde music • Bruce Russell • Chris Cudby • contemporary sound art • drone musicelectronic music • experiential listening space • experiential musicexperimental music • Glenda Keam • Jeff Henderson • Joeseph Nunweek • Jon Bywater • live context • live media • Nigel Wright • noiseoral history • outsider music • Philip Dadson • Rachel Shearer • radio art • Richard Francis • Rosy Parlane • Sally McKintyre • Sam Hamilton • Sean Kerr • sonic artistsonic artssoundsound art • sound culture • sound performance • Stefan Neville • Tim Coster • Zita Joyce • Zoe Drayton

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2013

Earth houses give pupils refuge from Heathrow noise

"Buildings originally designed for earthquake and emergency zones in Asia and Africa are now being erected in London playgrounds to shield schoolchildren from the noise of aircraft landing at Heathrow. ...

The superadobe design was an invention of the Iranian architect Nader Khalili, originally with a view to lunar settlements but first employed in a refugee crisis after the 1990–91 Gulf war, before answering the needs of west London's noise–afflicted schoolchildren. The buildings can withstand tremors with a magnitude of up to 5.7. Their domes are also immune to the damage occasionally wrought on local homes' tiled roofs by vortices from incoming jets.

The headteacher, Kathryn Harper–Quinn, estimates that when outside, teachers are rendered inaudible to pupils for 25 seconds in every 90. 'I've been very concerned about the effects of the noise on the children's learning,' she said.

In the huts, she added, 'you can still hear the planes but you can also hear your own voice'. She said that as outdoor learning was both valued by teachers and a statutory part of the curriculum, staff had developed strategies to deal with aircraft noise, including the use of whistles to alert children who could not hear when teachers were speaking.

She said it was also important that the adobe structures were a refuge for children outside lesson times. 'When kids are playing they are also developing their language skills, and in the playground again they're being interrupted.'"

(Gwyn Topham, 22 April 2013, The Guardian)

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adobe structuresaeroplaneair traffic • aircraft landing • aircraft noise • airport noise • amphitheatre • built environmentchildren • dome • environmental noise • excessive noise • flight-path • Hounslow Heath • hut • inaudible • infant school • Iranian • Julian Faulkner • Kathryn Harper-Quinn • kidslandscape architecturelanguage skills • London Heathrow Airport • Nader Khalili • noise • noise level • noise pollution • outdoor noise • outside lesson • passenger aircraftplace for childrenplaygroundprimary schoolrefuge • roar • Slough • superadobe • The GuardianUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 OCTOBER 2011

Zło muzykalna stacja dysków / Evil floppy drives

"Dźwięk powstaje poprzez ruch głowicy, która jest przesuwana krokowo z odpowiednią częstotliwością. Opis interfejsu można znaleźć np. TUTAJ. Wystarczy jedynie aktywować stację przez podanie stan niskiego na DRVSB0 lub 1 (w zależności czy mamy taśmę z crossem i do której wtyczki podłączona jest stacja) i wybrać kierunek ruchu głowicy (stan niski/wysoki na DIR), a zbocze opadające na STEP spowoduję ruch głowicy o jeden krok. Całością steruje mikrokontroler ATMega."

(SileNT)

[Creating music using a microcontroller to control twin stepper motors in floppy drives –in this case to play the Star Wars Emperor's Theme.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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