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Which clippings match 'Description Of Reality' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 OCTOBER 2013

Creating a Technical Specification

"A technical specification is a document that defines a set of requirements that a product or assembly must meet or exceed. A product or assembly that does not meet all of the specifically expressed requirements does not meet the specification, and often is referred to as being out of specification or 'out of spec.' Specifications are used when a contract for technical products or services is issued. The technical specification defines the requirements to fulfill the contract."

(WikiHow)

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TAGS

abbreviations • appropriately complex representation • business document • clarity of thought • closed specification • contractual requirements • description of realitydesign projects • detailed specification • direct sentences • explicit definitionsexplicit meaningexplicit objectives • general requirements • industry terms • jargon • open specification • operational criteriaoperational definitions • out of spec • out of specification • performance requirements • precision • product or assembly • product requirements • professional communication practices • project specification • quantification of variablesquantified measurement • required performances • requirements gatheringrequirements process • set of requirements • software engineeringspecification • technical product • technical requirements • technical specification • TLA

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 APRIL 2011

Scrum and Extreme Programming: User Stories

"User stories are one of the primary development artifacts for Scrum and Extreme Programming (XP) project teams. A user story is a very high–level definition of a requirement, containing just enough information so that the developers can produce a reasonable estimate of the effort to implement it."

(Scott W. Ambler, 2009)

Fig.1 User story card (informal, high level).

Fig.2 User story card (formal, high level).

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2011

Scientists revise their criteria of rationality as they enter new domains

"The conventional model of science, technology and society locates sources of violence in politics and ethics, that is, in the application of science and technology, not in scientific knowledge itself.

The fact–value dichotomy is a creation of modern, reductionist science which, while being an epistemic response to a particular set of values, claims to be independent of values. According to the received view, modern science is the discovery of the properties of nature in accordance with a 'scientific method' which generates 'objective', 'neutral', 'universal' knowledge. This view of modern science as a description of reality as it is, unprejudiced by value, can be rejected on at least four grounds.

All knowledge, including modern scientific knowledge, is built through the use of a plurality of methodologies. As Feyerabend observes:

There is no 'scientific method'; there is no single procedure, or set of rules that underlines every piece of research and guarantees that it is 'scientific' and, therefore, trustworthy. The idea of a universal and stable method that is an unchanging measure of adequacy and even the idea of a universal and stable rationality is as unrealistic as the idea of a universal and stable measuring instrument that measures any magnitude, no matter what the circumstances. Scientists revise their standards, their procedures, their criteria of rationality as they move along and perhaps entirely replace their theories and their instruments as they move along and enter new domains of research (Feyerband, 1978, p. 98).

The view that science is just a discovery of facts about nature does not get support from philosophy either. If scientific knowledge is assumed to give true, factual knowledge of 'reality as it is', then we would have to 'conclude that Newtonian theory was true until around 1900, after which it suddenly became false, while relativity and quantum theories became the truth' (Bohm, 1981, p. 4)."

(Vandana Shiva, 1990)

1). Shiva, V. (1990). 'Reductionist science as epistemological violence'. 'Science, Hegemony and Violence: A Requiem for Modernity'. A. Nandy, Oxford University Press: 314.

Paul Feyerabend, Science in a Free Society (London: New Left Books, 1978).

David Bohm, Wholeness and the Implicate Order (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1981).

TAGS

analytical thinkingCartesiancultural valuesdescription of realitydiscoursediscoverydiscursive fieldepistemologyethicsfactual knowledgehierarchy of legitimacyIsaac Newtonknowledge • logical-analytical • logical-analytical paradigmmeasuring instrument • model of science • Modernmodern science • modern scientific knowledge • myth of neutralityobjectiveobjective reality • Paul Feyerband • plurality of methodologies • positivismproperties of naturerationalityreductionism • reductionist science • researchresearch methodsciencescientific knowledgescientific method • scientific options • sociology • stable knowledge • stable rationality • theorytraditiontrust • trustworthy • truthuniversal • universal knowledge • universal methoduniversal rationalityVandana Shiva

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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