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Which clippings match 'History Of Cinema' keyword pg.1 of 2
08 MAY 2013

The Open Road: an early travelogue in colour

"In 1924 Claude Friese–Greene (cinematographer and son of moving–image pioneer William) embarked on an intrepid road trip from Land's End to John O'Groats. He recorded his journey on film, using an experimental colour process. Entitled The Open Road, this remarkable travelogue was conceived as a series of 26 short episodes, to be shown weekly at the cinema."

(Independent Cinema Office, UK)

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1920s1926BFI National Archive • British pioneer • cinemacinema pioneer • cinema technician • Claude Friese-Greene • colourcolour film • colour footage • colour processcultural heritageepisodes • experimental colour process • footage • Friese-Greene Natural Colour • history of cinema • Independent Cinema Office • John OGroats • Jonquil • journey • Lands End • Londonnatural colour • picture-postcard • road journey • road trip • social history • The Open Road (1926) • travelogueUK • William Friese-Greene • Yann Tiersen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2012

World's first colour film footage viewed for first time

"'It's very significant indeed, it's the world's first natural colour film and the fact that it's a Brit who invented it is fantastic.'

Bryony Dixon, curator of silent film at the British Film Institute (BFI) National Archives, said the 1902 footage was of international significance for the cinema world.

The films were made by Edward Raymond Turner from London who patented his colour process on 22 March, 1899. Some of the footage features Mr Turner's children in the garden of their home in Hounslow."

(12 September 2012, BBC News)

The world's first colour moving pictures dating from 1902 have been found by the National Media Museum in Bradford after lying forgotten in a tin for 110 years.

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1902BFIBFI National ArchiveBritish Film Institute • Charles Urban • cinema • cinema apparatus • colour • colour effect • colour filmcolour process • colour reproduction • cultural history • Edward Raymond Turner • George Albert Smith • historical importancehistory of cinema • international significance • invention • invention of cinema • Kinemacolour • mechanical deviceNational Media Museumnatural colour • natural colour film • non-standard size • pioneeringprojectorsilent cinemasilent filmTechnicolortechnology innovationUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2012

Alfred Hitchcock interviewed by Tom Snyder in 1973

"Long thought to be lost or destroyed a complete recording has been found of one of the few hour long interviews of Alfred Hitchcock . Originally broadcast as one of the first Tomorrow Shows with Tom Snyder in the Fall of 1973. This recording is from a second repeat of this show broadcast on Memorial day, 1980.

The VHS (SP) tape itself was found to be in excellent condition. While properly stored in a climate controlled environment it apparently had not been played in decades. Great care has been taken to make the digital transfer."

Uploaded by "willg550187415" on 8 Oct 2009

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1973Alfred Hitchcockblack humourBritishBritish directorBritish film director • cameo appearance • chat show • cinemacinema historycinema pioneerfamous peoplefamous personalitiesfilmfilm directorhistorical figureshistory of cinemainnovatorinterview • lost tapes • pioneerpractitioner interview • suspense • talk show • television interview • Tom Snyder • Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder • TVVHS

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 OCTOBER 2011

Das Kabinett des Doktor Caligari / The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

"The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is the first modern Horror Film and it influence a number of contemporary productions."

Robert Wiene (1920). "Das Kabinett des Doktor Caligari / The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari".

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1920 • Cabinet of Dr. Caligari • Das Kabinett des Doktor Caligari • death-like sleep • doctorexpressionisticfilmGerman Expressionismhistory of cinema • horrible experiences • horrorhorror filminfluential worksmemorymise-en-scenemurdermysterious • Robert Wiene • scene compositionset decorsilent filmsomnambulistvisual designvisual elements

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2011

New technical possibilities: synchronous recording of sight and sound

"In the late 1950s major breakthroughs began to occur in the technology available to filmmakers. These occasioned what can be thought of either as something totally new under the artistic sun or merely as new ways of doing old things. What they permitted was the synchronous recording of sight and sound outside the confines of soundstages and studio back lots. Virtually anything that could be seen and heard could now be captured on sound film almost anywhere. These new technical possibilities did not dictate the uses to which they would be put, however. One of those uses was that of the Americans who called what they were doing direct cinema. Another was that of Frenchman Jean Rouch, who coined the term cinema verite (film truth) to apply to his own work."

(Jack Ellis and Betsy McLane, 2005, p.208)

Jack Ellis and Betsy McLane, A New History of Documentary Film, (2005), 208–325.

Fig.1 Albert (right) with David Maysles on the set of 'Grey Gardens' (1975).

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16mm1950s3-lens turretAlbert Maysles • Arriflex • audio recorderauthorshipcamera technologycapturecinema veritecinematographyconvergencecreative practiceDavid Mayslesdevicedirect cinemadocumentaryDonn A. Pennebaker • Drew Associates • FFL • film truth • filmmakers • fixed focal length • history of cinemainnovationJean Rouch • lightweight • Nagranew technical possibilities • primary focal length • prime lens • realismRichard Leacock • Robert Drew • sight and sound • solution • sound film • soundstage • synchronous recording • technology • telephoto lens • Terrence McCartney Filgate • truthvisual depictionvisual languagezoom lens

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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