Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Magazines' keyword pg.1 of 1
22 SEPTEMBER 2014

Jean-Luc Godard's Critical Appropriation of Graphic Design

"The films of Jean–Luc Godard have been written about perhaps more than any other cinematic works, often through the lens of cultural theory, but not nearly enough attention has been paid to the role of designed objects in his films. Collages of art, literature, language, objects, and words, Godard's films have an instant, impactful, graphic quality, but are far from simple pop artifacts. The thesis this presentation derives from, 'Objects to be Read, Words to be Seen: Design and Visual Language in the Films of Jean–Luc Godard 1959–1967,' explores and interprets the role of visual language within the films–title sequences, intertitles, handwritten utterances, and printed matter in the form of newspapers, magazines, and posters.

By examining le graphisme within the cultural context of Paris during the 1960s, this thesis seeks to amplify the significance of graphic design in Godard's first fifteen films, beginning with 1960's À Bout de Souffle (Breathless) and ending with 1967's Weekend. While Godard was not a practicing graphic designer in the traditional sense, he was an amateur de design, an autodidact whose obsession with designed objects, graphic language and print media resulted in the most iconic body of work in 1960s France."

(Laura Forde, 30 April 2010)

1
2

3

4

TAGS

1960s • A Bout de Souffle (1959) • amateur de design • appropriation • autodidact • Breathless (1959) • cinematic visual language • cinematic works • critical appropriationcultural context • cultural theory • design and visual language • design sense • designed objects • designed thingsend titlesFrancegraphic design • graphic language • graphic quality • hand lettering • handwritten utterances • iconic body of work • intertitlesJean-Luc Godard • Laura Forde • le graphisme • magazinesnewspapersParisPierrot le Fou (1965)postersprint media • printed matter • title sequencetitle stillsTwo Or Three Things I Know About Hertypographyvideo lecturevisual languagevisual sensibilityWeekend

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2013

Mobile Apps: the trouble with using 'Responsive Design'

"Amid an overwhelming amount of mobile options and solutions, it's easy to see why responsive design's singular code seems like an alluring universal panacea for mobile optimization. However, while responsive design aims to scale web content fluidly across multiple devices with different screen sizes, it may not represent the best option for organizations aiming to deliver unique and innovative experiences to customers. ...

The future of digital business depends primarily on mastering the mobile channel. Mobile's mushrooming numbers are due to the convenience of remote access and a new reliance upon the delivery of information when and where little to none was previously available. When developing your approach to engaging customers via mobile, it is key to ensure your strategy accounts for the rising expectations your customers have for this important channel.

Once you understand the kind of mobile experience you want to create, you can decide whether adopting a responsive design philosophy can deliver upon these expectations and goals. While responsive design can help you achieve a certain measure of consistency across channels, the real prize lies with the ability to create unique experiences. A broader multi–screen approach designed dynamically by channel will enable the sort of customer experiences that yield higher engagement and contribute to overall success."

(Carin van Vuuren, 18 November 2012, Forbes)

TAGS

appconveniencecustomer experiencedesign principles • device-specific content display • differencedigital business • engaging customers via mobile • Forbes • Forrester • information delivery • interactive experienceLinkedInmagazinesmobile apps • mobile channel • mobile development • mobile experience • mobile optimisation • mobile site • mobile solutions • mobile strategy • multi-screenmultiple devicesnewspapers • one-web • People magazine • remote access • responsive design • responsive site • responsive web design • scale web content • screen size and orientation • screen sizes • singular code • smartphonetechnology solutionuse case • varying screen sizes • web development • web experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MARCH 2011

Trove: repository of Australian cultural heritage

"Trove is a new discovery experience focused on Australia and Australians. It supplements what search engines provide. If you are researching in the fields of the social sciences, literature, local or family history, or need inspiration for your school assignment, then this is the tool for you.

For example if researching images relating to Edmund Barton, our first Prime Minister, results will include descriptions such as people, book, manuscript, map and newspaper articles. A researcher searching for information on Nellie Melba will be presented with a range of results including biographies, pictures, music, newspapers, books etc."

(The National Library of Australia)

Fig.1 Teenage Weekly Supplement (page 5) in Australian Womens Weekly 20 September 1961 [http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/imageservice/nla.news–page4830846/print]

1

TAGS

archive • ARO • articlesAustralia • Australian Research Online • biographybookscataloguecategoryclassificationcollectioncontentcultural heritagedigital heritagefamily history • historic newspapers • images • journals • knowledge managementliteraturemagazinesmapsnational cultural heritage onlinenational heritagenational identityNational Library of Australianewspaperrepositoryresourceresourcessearch enginesocial historysocial sciencesTrove • Womens Weekly

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.