Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Genre' keyword pg.1 of 2
06 MAY 2011

Infographics for the Canal+ network

Adverstising campaign for the network Canal+ // Creatives : Gregory Ferembach & David Troquier Agency : BETC eurorscg Paris // Créative Director: Olivier Apers // Illustrator : Les Graphiquants

Fig.1–5 "J'ai Envie de Faire un Court–métrage"; "J'ai Envie de Faire un film d'animation"; "J'ai Envie de Faire un film d'horreur"; "J'ai Envie de Faire un film d'action"; "J'ai Envie de Faire un Film Porno". [English versions]

1

2

3

4

5

TAGS

action movie • adverstising campain • animated movie • BETC Euro RSCG • Canal Plus • Canal+ • chart • David Troquier • design processdiagram • directeur artistique • film genrefilm posterfilm productionfilmmakingflow diagramflowchartgenregraphic design • Gregory Ferembach • horror movieinfographicsinformation aestheticsinformation graphicsinstructional design • Les Graphiquants • network Canal+ • Olivier Apers • pornoposterschemashort filmvisual communicationvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2011

Drew's Script-O-Rama: free film and TV screenplays since 1995

"It was eons before I discovered that 'lauded' was a good thing.

Anyway, I'm more like that slack–assed buddy who doesn't return your phone calls, has owed you twenty bucks for the last 14 years and flirts with your wife when it comes to updating the site at times. For that I feel shame. Shame, I feel. But hey, it's 2010 now, and I'm a changed man. Besides, don't I get some slack since I've had this site up since 1995? Val Kilmer used to be Batman back then! And Mr. Showbiz left you high and dry, but your friend Drew, he sticks with you while simultaneously referring to himself in the third person!"

(Drew, 2010)

[Note that this site includes a large number of inelegant ads.]

1

TAGS

1995artistic practiceauthorauthorshipBatmancharactercharacterisationculture • draft • dramafeature filmfictionfilm genrefilm scriptsfilmmakerfreegenregift cultureHollywoodHollywood movieslinks worklistliterature • Mr. Showbiz • narrative fictionplotprecedencerepositoryresourcescreen culturescreenplay • screenwriter • screenwritingscript • Script-O-Rama • televisiontranscript • Val Kilmer • writing process

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 DECEMBER 2009

An Unidentified Species: Horror, The Body and Early Television

"it was hoped that horror materials would establish a 'new aesthetic' for television drama that would both create a distinctive feel and exploit features seen as specific to the medium of television (Cooke 2003: 16). For example, Jacobs quotes a memo from Robert MacDermot , Head of BBC Television Drama, to Cecil McGiven, Head of Television, in which he suggests that ghost stories might be well suited to television, and could be used to 'create a very effective eerie atmosphere' (Quoted in Jacobs 2000: 97). Rather than a situation in which 'made–for–television horror would seem to be by definition impossible' (Waller 1987: 159), the BBC seemed to both hope and fear that the ' intimate' quality of television would make it particularly effective as a horror medium."

(Mark Jancovich)

Fig.1 1953 original BBC TV version starred Isobel Dean as Judith Carroon and Reginald Tate as Professor Bernard Quatermass in The Quatermass Experiment.

1

TAGS

1953BBC • Catherine Johnson • Charles Barr • formatgenrehorror • Lez Cooke • made-for-television • mediummilestone • Quatermass Experiment • serial • serial format • television • television serial • TVvisual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JULY 2009

Thomas Allen: pulp fiction remixes

"[Thomas] Allen's photographs are inspired by his childhood experiences with pop–up books and View–Masters. He begins his process by cutting figures and images out of illustrated pages of old books and vintage fiction novels. Allen then cleverly rearranges and juxtaposes the forms to create three–dimensional scenes. Next, he carefully lights his subjects and photographs the scenes.

When separated from their original stories, the figures take on fresh roles in entirely new situations. Yet they retain their intended purpose of storytelling. Characters and objects originally created as two–dimensional illustrations are raised from their pages and given new life in three–dimensional space. The figures return back to two–dimensional objects, this time in the form of a photograph."
(Joseph Bellows Gallery)

1

2

3

4

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2008

World-building in Urban Fantasy

"Urban Fantasy came into popularity in the early 1980's and has continued to expand and gain a devoted readership. Although certain conventions of early Urban Fantasy have changed, such as the world model and narrative style, the multifarious nature of the genre has not. Often defined as fantasy for those who do not like fantasy, Urban Fantasy attracts an audience from many diverse reading backgrounds because it does not use a straight Fantasy narrative formula as its label implies. In fact, aside from employing magic and myth, Urban Fantasy is not exceedingly similar to traditional Fantasy because it employs a realistic rather than imagined setting. Although contemporary, the grittier side of the urban location more closely resembles that of Dark Fantasy, which combines elements of the fantastic with Horror. A recent article from the Library Journal, titled – The City Fantastic, claims – contemporary Urban Fantasy started as an offshoot of horror fiction rather than sf [science fiction]/fantasy (Donohue, par. 6). And still other critics of the genre maintain that it owes much of its conventions to Crime fiction. With so many contributors, at least one certainty can be ascertained– Urban Fantasy is not rooted in a single genre, but in many, borrowing different popular fiction conventions to build a unique but relatable storyworld."
(Julie Saffel p.65)

1

TAGS

Buffy • Buffy the Vampire Slayercrime fictionfantasyfictiongenrehorrornarrativesci-fistoryworldurban • urban fantasy • vampireworld of the storyworld-building

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.