Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Genetic Engineering' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 NOVEMBER 2016

Alex Gendler: how to recognize a dystopia

"The genre of dystopia – the 'not good place'– has captured the imaginations of artists and audiences alike for centuries. But why do we bother with all this pessimism? Alex Gendler explains how dystopias act as cautionary tales – not about some particular government or technology, but the very idea that humanity can be molded into an ideal shape."

1

TAGS

Aldous Huxley • Alex Gendler • Animal Farm (1954)artificial intelligence • aryan • atomic energyBlade Runner (1982)brave new world • Brave New World (1932) • cautionary talecommunist systemconcentration campdemocracydepletion of natural resourcesDr Strangelove (1964) • drudgery • dystopia • dystopian fiction • dystopian literature • dystopian science fictioneugenicsfactory workerfascismfree willgas chambergenetic engineering • Gullivers Travels (1726) • H G Wells • humanitys future • impoverished masses • impoverishment • industrial ageindustrial revolution • industrial warfare • It Cant Happen Here (1935) • Jack London • Jonathan Swift • mass entertainment • mass media ageMetropolis (1927) • modern anxieties • nightmare world • Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)nuclear war • oligarchy • oppressionoverpopulationparadise • perfect world • political structures • povertyprogress narratives • resource depletion • science fiction • Sinclair Lewis • slumsocial rolessocial structures • space colony • space travelspeculative fiction • squalor • surveillance state • TED-Ed • The Handmaids Tale (1985) • The Iron Heel (1908) • The RepublicThe Time MachineThomas Moretotalitarianism • tyrannical oligarchy • tyranny of modernismutopia • V for Vendetta (2006) • Watchmen (2009) • We (1924) • Westworld (1973) • WW1WWII • Yevgeny Zamyatin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2010

NextNature: What is our concept of nature?

"Despite the global awareness of our fragile relation with nature and the countless projects initiated to restore the balance, almost no one has asked the question: What is our concept of nature? And how is our relation with nature changing? ...

This website explores our changing notion of nature. How nature has become one of the most successful products of our time, yet much of what we perceive as nature is merely a simulation: a romanticized idea of a balanced, harmonic, inherently good and threatened entity. How evolution continues nonetheless. How technology–traditionally created to protect us from the forces of nature–gives rise to a next nature, that is just as wild, cruel, unpredictable and threatening as ever. How we are playing with fire again and again. How we should be careful in doing so, yet how this is also what makes us human."

(NextNature.net)

Fig.1 Aaron Koblin (2008). 'Video capture of SMS visualization tool looking at the city of Amsterdam on New Years Eve 2007. Data from KPN Telcom.'

Fig.2 Julia Müller, Arjan Groot and Menno Wittebrood. 'Birthmarks tattoo', Identity Matters magazine.

1
2

TAGS

applied researchawareness raisingbio-ethicsclimate changeconsumptiondesign intelligencedesign responsibilityenvironmentethicsgenetic engineering • human impact • industrialinformation aesthetics • Koert van Mensvoort • manufacturingnaturalnature • NextNature • obsolescenceposthumanreflexive modernisationromanticismsocial changesustainability • technological impact • technology and nature • transformationvisualisationwaste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MAY 2010

Scientists create first synthetic living cell

"Scientists in the US have succeeded in developing the first synthetic living cell. The researchers constructed a bacterium's 'genetic software' and transplanted it into a host cell. The resulting microbe then looked and behaved like the species 'dictated' by the synthetic DNA. ... The researchers constructed a bacterium's 'genetic software' and transplanted it into a host cell. The resulting microbe then looked and behaved like the species 'dictated' by the synthetic DNA. ... Dr [Craig] Venter likened the advance to making new software for the cell. The researchers copied an existing bacterial genome. They sequenced its genetic code and then used 'synthesis machines' to chemically construct a copy. Dr Venter told BBC News: 'We've now been able to take our synthetic chromosome and transplant it into a recipient cell – a different organism. 'As soon as this new software goes into the cell, the cell reads [it] and converts into the species specified in that genetic code.' The new bacteria replicated over a billion times, producing copies that contained and were controlled by the constructed, synthetic DNA. 'This is the first time any synthetic DNA has been in complete control of a cell,' said Dr Venter."

(Victoria Gill, BBC News)

1

TAGS

2010artificial life • bacteria • bacterial genome • bio-ethicsbiologybreakthroughcelldiscoveryDNAethics • genetic code • genetic engineering • genetic software • microbeorganismspeciessynthesis machinessyntheticsynthetic biology • synthetic living cell • Synthia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2009

Mutant Fruit: Biological Hybridization

"pluots and apriums aren't just recently popularized fruits. They're the result of hard work by the Zaiger family of Modesto, California, who for the last 30 years or so, have been quietly marrying apricots and plums – among other stone fruits – in an effort to create crazy new fruits (with Zaiger–registered trademarks, of course) for the marketplace."

(MissGinsu.com)

1

TAGS

agriculture • apricot • aprium • bio-ethicsbiologicalbiologybiotechnology • breeding • foodfruit • fruit hybridization • genetic engineeringhybridhybridisation • Modesto • mutant • nectacotum • nectaplum • nectarcot • peacotum • plant • plum • plumcot • pluot • Prunus • reflexive modernisationreproductionscience • strawbana • Zaiger Genetics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2009

The Photomontages of Hannah Höch

"The 'bob–haired muse', the 'holy shears' and 'Dada's good girl' are a few of the epitaphs that prevail in the comfortable little niche art history has carved out for Hannah Höch. These sound bites are seriously challenged by this travelling retrospective organised by the Walker Art Center. 'The Photomontages of Hannah Höch' momentously reconstructs her marginalised role in early 20th–century art and perhaps even ordains her as the single most influential female artist of the century. The exhibition surveying Höch's 55 years of photomontage not only rescues her from the anti–art antics of the legendary Berlin Dada circle but inclusively chronicles her private and aesthetic journey through the social and cultural constructs that have emerged in the 20th century. While she may have been remembered by her bombastic Dada colleagues for her 'sandwiches, beer and coffee', her lifetime of artistic practice reveals a vital and critical woman who could magically collide disparate reproductions of needlepoint patterns, political figures, film stars, animal life and non–Western artefacts into explorations of androgyny, Aryan activity, gender roles, imperialism, race and lesbianism."

(Michelle Grabner, Issue 33 March–April 1997, Frieze Magazine)

Fig.1 Hannah Höch "Entwurf für das Denkmal eines bedeutenden Spitzenhemdes", 1922, Entwurf, Tafelmalerei, Collage, 27,4 x 17 cm, Hamburg, Hamburger Kunsthalle, Ikonographie (Iconclass)

1

2

TAGS

1920s • abstract collage • aesthetic journey • androgyny • anti-art posture • anti-composition • artartistartistic practiceBauhaus School • Berlin Dada • collagecoloured papercultural constructs • cut-and-sew lines • cut-outDadadecorationdecorative arts • decorative beauty • decorative sewingdesign formalismearly 20th centuryembroideryembroidery design • erotic photomontage • female activity • female artist • female features • female leisure • feminist artist • film starformal elementsFrieze (magazine)gender rolesgenetic engineering • good girl • handicraftHannah Hoch • hausfrau • homosexualityillustrative styleimperialism • kitchen knife • manipulative propaganda • marginalisation • mens work • modern womanmodernist tradition • needlepoint patterns • New Weimer Woman • non-Western artefacts • photomontage • pictorially ordered • political satirequeernessretrospective exhibitionRussian constructivismsewing and craftsocial construction • social constructs • traditional crafts • tulle netting • tulle patterns • typography • vital and critical • Walker Art CenterWeimar Republicwomanwomen artistswomen in art and design • womens activities

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.