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Which clippings match 'Next Gen. Report' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 FEBRUARY 2016

The Nesta Digital Makers programme

"Digital technologies touch every aspect of life and business – but most people just use them and relatively few create them. We want to mobilise a generation of young people with the drive, confidence and know-how to understand how technology works and make their own new technology – whether websites, apps, hardware, games or innovations we haven't yet imagined."

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TAGS

21st century literaciesAutodeskBBC Make It DigitalBBC micro:bitcode clubdesign and technologydigital fabricationdigital literacies • digital makers • digital making • digital making club • digital making community • digital making event • digital making kit • digital making opportunities • digital making workshop • digital skillsdigital skills for the futuredigital technologiesengineering and designEric Schmidt • fundamental literacy • iRights • know-how • making and sharing • MozillaNESTANext Gen. report • Nominet Trust • Scottish Government • technology education • Technopop • tools for change • UK • understand how technology works • young people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2011

UK Video Games and Video Effects Skills Review

"In July 2010, Ed Vaizey, the Minister for Culture, Communications and the Creative Industries asked Ian Livingstone and Alex Hope to undertake a Review of the skills needs of the UK's video games and visual effects industries and to make practical recommendations for how these needs can be met.

Six months later, after working closely with NESTA and after close consultation with their fellow practitioners, school teachers and university lecturers and conducting a comprehensive programme of data gathering and original research, they are presenting Next Gen: Transforming the UK into the world's leading talent hub for the video games and visual effects industries.

In the report they detail a set of 20 recommendations for government, educators and industry, identifying clearly in each case where we see lead responsibility lying."

(UK National Endowment for Science Technology and the Arts)

Fig.1 VFX still from Iron Man 2, the Movie © 2010 MVL Film Finance LLC. Iron Man, the Character TM & © 2010 Marvel Entertainment LLC & subs. All rights reserved.

2). Next Gen: Transforming the UK

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 MAY 2011

Keeping Britain's special effects dream alive

"The country's reputation as the go–to Hollywood alternative was underlined at this year's Academy Awards when London–based Double Negative picked up the visual effects Oscar for its work on Inception.

The company, which has also been involved in the Harry Potter and Batman series, employs around 950 people at its headquarters in Soho.

Across the UK, approximately 5,000 people work in SFX post–production, according to the UK Screen Association.

But while business is currently booming, there are dark, computer–generated, clouds on the horizon.

A report, commissioned by the government and published earlier this year, delivered a worrying prognosis.

It warned that, while special effects was enjoying a rapid growth, the sector was also 'having to source talent from overseas because of skills shortages at home'.

The study, entitled Next Gen, concluded: 'That is mainly a failing of our education system – from schools to universities and it needs to be tackled urgently if we are to remain globally competitive.'

Part of the problem is the lack of awareness of the profession among young people, according to Paul Franklin, a visual effects supervisor and part of Double Negative's Oscar–winning team.

'There is not a huge amount of information available to them,' he told BBC News.

'Typically you tend to find that students who are seeking out courses in visual effects and film–making are the self motivated types who have gone out and found the information themselves.'

'It is something we work very hard at, but schools and colleges could be more aware about how a creative art education can be applied in the world of high–end modern digital media,' he said."

(BBC News, 14 May 2011)

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TAGS

Academy Award • accolade • American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences • AMPAS • Batmancomputer-generated • creative art education • creative careercreative economydesign curriculadesign disciplinedesign professiondigital mediaDouble Negativeeducation systemfilmmaking • globally competitive • Harry PotterHollywoodInception (2010) • lack of awareness • LondonNext Gen. reportOscar • Paul Franklin • post productionprofessional practiceSFXskills shortageSohospecial effectsstudentUK • UK Screen Association • VFX industriesvisual effects • visual effects supervisor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2011

Livingstone-Hope Skills Review

"In July 2010 Ed Vaizey MP, Minister for Culture, Communications and the Creative Industries asked Ian Livingstone and Alex Hope, working with NESTA and Skillset to produce an independent report into the skills needed for school leavers and graduates to fully engage with the UK's world–class video games and visual effects industries."

(NESTA, UK)

Fig.1 Ian Livingstone 'Livingstone–Hope Skills Review'.

Fig.2 Alex Hope 'Livingstone–Hope Skills Review'.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2011

Next Gen. Transforming the UK into the world's leading talent hub for the video games and visual effects industries

"This landmark report sets out how the UK can be transformed into the world's leading talent hub for video games and visual effects.

At over £2 billion in global sales, the UK's video games sector is bigger than either its film or music industries, and visual effects, the fastest growing component of the UK's film industry, grew at an explosive 16.8 per cent between 2006 and 2008. High–tech, knowledge–intensive sectors and, in the case of video games, major generators of intellectual property, these industries have all the attributes the UK needs to succeed in the 21st century.

Yet, the sad truth is that we are already starting to lose our cutting edge: in just two years, it seems the UK's video games industry has dipped from third to sixth place in the global development rankings.

Meanwhile, the visual effects industry, though still enjoying very rapid growth, is having to source talent from overseas because of skills shortages at home. That is mainly a failing of our education system – from schools to universities – and it needs to be tackled urgently if we are to remain globally competitive."

(NESTA, UK)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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