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Which clippings match 'Video Games Industry' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 JUNE 2015

A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space

"In the opening pages of her classic essay, A Room of Ones Own, Virginia Woolf describes being blocked from entering the 'turf' of the University in Oxbridge by an administrative gate-keeper.

Instantly a man's figure rose to intercept me. … His face expressed horror and indignation. Instinct rather than reason came to my help, he was a Beadle; I was a woman. This was the turf; there was the path. Only the Fellows and Scholars are allowed here; the gravel is the place for me' (Woolf, 1929).

This scene invokes the ways in which women have been systematically barred from the digital playground, both as players and as creators of play space. To a large extent, the video game industry in the U.S. remains dominated by a boys-only ethos that harkens back to the gender-biased practices in the British academia of Woolf's day.[1] Games that are female-friendly are often couched in derogatory or dismissive terms: The Sims (Maxis, 2000) is 'not really a game'; casual games are not counted as 'real' games by many in the industry.[2] The result is that certain types of games, game mechanics, play patterns, and, as we'll see, particular types of game spaces have tended to dominate the field of games.

Although this paper discusses the ways in which digital game spaces have been strongly gendered towards male constructions of space and play, this does not necessarily mean we advocate creating exclusively female (or 'pink') games. As Woolf points out in her essay, the solution is not simply to create a distinctly feminine voice (although this is one potential angle of approach), but rather to promote the cultivation of an 'androgynous mind', which, she suggests, is already possessed by male authors of great note throughout history (she cites Shakespeare as an example). We propose drawing from a number of cultural practices, literary sources, and existing games in order to pave the way for a playground that is more open to female players. Thus we promote not only the definition of new feminine game spaces, but also encourage designers to think in terms of 'androgynous space' that engages all aspects of all persons: a space into which women and girls are invited and welcomed, but in which men and boys can also enjoy more diverse and nuanced forms of play than are typically available to them."

(Tracy Fullerton, Jacquelyn Ford Morie and Celia Pearce, "A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space", The Fibreculture Journal : 11)

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TAGS

2008 • A Room of Ones Own (1929) • androgynous mind • androgynous space • boys-only ethos • British academia • casual gamesCelia Pearceconcepts of space • contested spaces • cultural practices • dangerous spaces • digital game spaces • digital playgrounddigital spacedolls house • domestic spaces • emotional space • enchanted worlds • female games • female players • female-friendly spaces • feminine conceptions of space • feminine game spaces • feminine voiceFibreculture Journal • game design as cultural practice • game mechanic • game spaces • games industrygames research • gender-biased practices • gendered spaces • gendered technology • gendered voices • gendering game space • Jacquelyn Ford Morie • male authors • male constructions of play • male constructions of space • MMOG • narrative spaces • nuanced forms of play • Oxbridge • pink games • play patterns • play spaces • poetics of digital space • procedural space • real games • regendered play space • regendering game space • secret places • social spacesThe Sims (2000) • Tracy Fullerton • video games industryVirginia Woolfvirtual spacesWilliam Shakespeare • women and games

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2011

UK Video Games and Video Effects Skills Review

"In July 2010, Ed Vaizey, the Minister for Culture, Communications and the Creative Industries asked Ian Livingstone and Alex Hope to undertake a Review of the skills needs of the UK's video games and visual effects industries and to make practical recommendations for how these needs can be met.

Six months later, after working closely with NESTA and after close consultation with their fellow practitioners, school teachers and university lecturers and conducting a comprehensive programme of data gathering and original research, they are presenting Next Gen: Transforming the UK into the world's leading talent hub for the video games and visual effects industries.

In the report they detail a set of 20 recommendations for government, educators and industry, identifying clearly in each case where we see lead responsibility lying."

(UK National Endowment for Science Technology and the Arts)

Fig.1 VFX still from Iron Man 2, the Movie © 2010 MVL Film Finance LLC. Iron Man, the Character TM & © 2010 Marvel Entertainment LLC & subs. All rights reserved.

2). Next Gen: Transforming the UK

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2011

Dara O'Briain: video games are an evolving artform!

"Mock The Week star Dara O'Briain has said he believes video games are on their way to becoming an artform, and advised anyone working in the visual arts to join the industry.

The comedian will host the 2011 British Academy Video Games Awards in London on Wednesday 16 March, to celebrate the best innovation and talent from the video games industry."

(BBC News, 16 February 2011)

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TAGS

2011art formaudience • British Academy Video Games Awards • cinemaconvergencecreative economycreative industriesDara O Briaindigital cultureevolutiongames • Heavy Rain • innovationmedia literacies • Mock The Week • Playstation 3Quantic DreamspectacletheatreUKvideo gamevideo games industryvisual artsvisual communicationvisual literacy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2011

Next Gen. Transforming the UK into the world's leading talent hub for the video games and visual effects industries

"This landmark report sets out how the UK can be transformed into the world's leading talent hub for video games and visual effects.

At over £2 billion in global sales, the UK's video games sector is bigger than either its film or music industries, and visual effects, the fastest growing component of the UK's film industry, grew at an explosive 16.8 per cent between 2006 and 2008. High–tech, knowledge–intensive sectors and, in the case of video games, major generators of intellectual property, these industries have all the attributes the UK needs to succeed in the 21st century.

Yet, the sad truth is that we are already starting to lose our cutting edge: in just two years, it seems the UK's video games industry has dipped from third to sixth place in the global development rankings.

Meanwhile, the visual effects industry, though still enjoying very rapid growth, is having to source talent from overseas because of skills shortages at home. That is mainly a failing of our education system – from schools to universities – and it needs to be tackled urgently if we are to remain globally competitive."

(NESTA, UK)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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