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28 MARCH 2013

All students should have the opportunity to be creative with code

This is a useful initiative, despite its narrow focus on engineering and science. It would be great to see the companion film which profiles creative arts and design professionals who regularly use programming as part of their practice/work.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Neville Brody: removal of design from school curriculum is 'insanity'

"plans to remove creative subjects from the UK curriculum are 'short–sighted insanity', according to incoming D&AD president Neville Brody (+ interview).

Speaking to Dezeen, Brody described government plans to overhaul the curriculum as 'one of the biggest mistakes in British government' and added: 'The UK government is trying to demolish and smash all ideas about creative education.'

In September, education secretary Michael Gove announced plans to replace GCSE examinations for students up to the age of 16 with a new English baccalaureate (EBacc) system. Creative subjects such as art and design will not count towards the EBacc qualifications, which instead are graded on performance in academic 'stem' subjects. These stem subjects are English, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and a language. ...

'The creative industries need high–quality creative graduates. If we're not getting the graduates, we're not going to sustain the industry,' said Brody. 'Creative services as a percentage of GDP is higher here than any other country, so why would you not want to support, promote and build that?'"

(Dezeen, 26 November 2012)

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TAGS

2012Andrew Marrart and designart schools • arts students • British Government • creative education • creative graduates • creative industriescreative professionscreative servicescreative subjectsD and ADdesign curriculumDezeenEBacceducation budgetEnglish BaccalaureateGCSE • GDP • graphic design agency • Michael GoveNeville Brody • non-UK students • overseas students • Research Studios (agency) • Royal College of Art • school of communication • skilled dangerous minds • STEM • studying arts • UKUK Governmentvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Chris Treweek
15 APRIL 2012

Ken Robinson: human ability and talent is highly diverse

"Yes you know there's this view that only special people are creative and it's not me. It's not it's not anybody I really know. It's a very isolated sort of genius you know to be really creative. And you know people doubt their own strengths and their own capacities. So I meet all kind of people who don't really get much fulfilment from the work they do. You know they just get through it and wait for the weekend. But I also meet people who love what they do. And couldn't imagine doing anything else. You know if you set and don't this anymore they wouldn't' know what you were talking about because this is who they are. You know I mean like I don't know what else I would do. They are so to speak in their element. And so the book is about that. It's about the journeys people took to discover their own talents and what difference it made in their lives. And I talk to all kinds of people. It's not just interviews. But the book is seasoned as you know with interviews with people in science in business in the arts in sports in technology all kinds of different fields and what's interesting to me is of course it's different for everybody and this is really a key point you know that human ability and talent is highly diverse. You know what turns somebody on might totally turn somebody else off. What excites some propel does not excite other people and I know when I am signing the book these days I always ask people what they do. And when they tell me I ask them if they like it. And I always think it's great when people say I love it. Because you just never [inaudible].'"

(Ken Robinson, Conversations from Penn State)

Fig.1 Conversations from Penn State Episode 207: Sir Ken Robinson, Uploaded by WPSU TV/FM/Online on 6 Nov 2010, YouTube.

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TAGS

2010 • all kinds of different fields • American schools • auditory learning • being really creative • career journeycareer narrativeconformity • Conversations from Penn State • creative capacity • creative capacity developmentcreativityeducation innovationeducation reformeducation systemgeniusgenius of the individualget a jobhuman resourcesisolated sort of geniusKen Robinson • kinaesthetic learning • kinesthetic learninglearning styleslone genius • no child left behind • only special people are creative • pathologized • Patty Satalia • PBSpedagogic codepedagogy • Penn State • PennState • Pennsylvania • psychologically abnormal • school systemsschoolingSingaporesocial construction of knowledgestandardisationstandardised testingstatistics can tell you most thingsSTEMstudenttailored curriculumtailoring curriculumtalent • talent is highly diverse • teaching to the test • three types of learners • University of Warwickvisual learning • WPSU

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 APRIL 2012

Open Educational Resources: CK-12 Foundation

"CK–12 Foundation is a non–profit organization with a mission to reduce the cost of textbook materials for the K–12 market both in the U.S. and worldwide. As a leading member of the OER movement, CK–12 is using an open–content, web–based collaborative model termed the 'FlexBook.' With these free, common core aligned and NSES aligned digital textbooks, CK–12 intends to pioneer the generation and distribution of high quality educational STEM content that will serve both as core text as well as provide an adaptive environment for learning through the FlexBook Platform"

(CK–12 Foundation)

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TAGS

access • CA initiative • California Free Digital Textbooks Initiative • CC • CC BY-NC-SA license • CC license • CK-12 Foundationcourse materials • customisable textbooks • customise textbooks • digital textbooks • flexbook • flexbooks • free digital textbooks • free materials • free online textbooks • free use • growing costs of textbooks • high school • in the public domain • K-12 • K-12 schools • learning and teachinglearning resource • next generation textbooks • nonprofit • NSES • OERonline access • online textbooks • Open Educational Resources (OER) • open license • open textbooks • PDF • share their materials • STEM • student resources • teacher resources • textbook • textbooksUniversal Education Search

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2011

Next Gen. Transforming the UK into the world's leading talent hub for the video games and visual effects industries

"This landmark report sets out how the UK can be transformed into the world's leading talent hub for video games and visual effects.

At over £2 billion in global sales, the UK's video games sector is bigger than either its film or music industries, and visual effects, the fastest growing component of the UK's film industry, grew at an explosive 16.8 per cent between 2006 and 2008. High–tech, knowledge–intensive sectors and, in the case of video games, major generators of intellectual property, these industries have all the attributes the UK needs to succeed in the 21st century.

Yet, the sad truth is that we are already starting to lose our cutting edge: in just two years, it seems the UK's video games industry has dipped from third to sixth place in the global development rankings.

Meanwhile, the visual effects industry, though still enjoying very rapid growth, is having to source talent from overseas because of skills shortages at home. That is mainly a failing of our education system – from schools to universities – and it needs to be tackled urgently if we are to remain globally competitive."

(NESTA, UK)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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