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20 DECEMBER 2012

The Ghosts of World War II: The photographs found at flea markets superimposed on to modern street scenes

"Historical expert Jo Teeuwisse, from Amsterdam, began the project after finding 300 old negatives at a flea market in her home city depicting familiar places in a very different context. She researched the background to each of the most interesting finds and created a beautiful series of pictures by super–imposing the old pictures on top of new ones.

Now she has rediscovered photographs of soldiers at war in France and across Europe and put together further sets of evocative and emotional designs."

(Emma Reynolds, 18 October 2012, DailyMail)

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Amsterdamarchaeologyatmosphericaugmented reality • Cherbourg • Drapeau de la France • Europe • evocative scenes • Flag of the United States of America • flea market • foundfound photographsFranceghostshaunting imageshistory • Jo Teeuwisse • layeringoverlaypalimpsest • photographic negatives • RotterdamSecond World War • Sicily • situated documentariessoldiers • soldiers at war • superimpositionUnion FlagUnited States Armed ForcesUtrecht • visual history • visual memory • war scenes • what came beforeWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2012

Annotate That! content commentary and sharing application

"Annotate That! is a free unique annotating service. Share web pages, images or documents with others and add your comments using annotations. Simply click on the web page or medium to make your annotation."

(Dean Claydon, We Create Digital)

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add your comments • annotate • Annotate That! • annotating service • annotationannotation serviceannotationsaugmentationaugmentative communicationaugmented contentcomment systemcontent sharingcooperative design knowledgecritical commentarycritique • Dean Claydon • digital contentembellishmenterasurehypermediacyinformation sharinginterpretationjuxtapositionlayerlayeredlayering • make your annotation • metadataorganisationoverlaypalimpsestreinterpretationresearch toolsharesharing and distributing knowledge • sharing application • sharing ideasstackingtext layers • We Create Digita

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2011

Onscreen discussion of the ontology of the photographic image

"The film commences with a fast moving introduction to the very stylish world of a hot fashion photographer, Thomas, played by that emblematic '60s actor, David Hemmings. This is the world made notorious by magazines like Tatler and Queen as well as all the tabloids of the world, all Pucci fashion, dolly birds (Jane Birkin made her name in this film), drugs, fast cars and rock–and–roll. ...

Throughout Blow Out and Blowup there is always a sense in which recording media themselves are seen as, somehow, treacherous. Antonioni's Blowup forcefully reminds us that even the latest technologies can mislead or betray us. In the computer age, it this remaining element of ontological uncertainty that still troubles the human observer–for we are not, quite yet, masters of information"

(Jonathan Dawson, February 2005, Senses of Cinema)

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1960s1966 • Blow Out (1981) • Blow-Up (1966) • Carlo Ponti • casual sexcontextcoolcountercultureDavid Bailey • David Hemmings • diegetic sound • Edward Bond • fashionfashion modelfashion photographerfashion photography • fashion shoot • feature filmfilm grainHerbie Hancockhuman perception • Jane Birkin • John Castle • Julio Cortazar • layeringLondonmake-upMichelangelo Antonionimod fashionmurderobscured view • ontology of the photographic image • photographphotographer • photographers studio • photographic blow-upsphotographic image • Sarah Miles • Senses of Cinema (journal)sixtiessixties cool • swinging sixties • The Yardbirds • Tonino Guerra • transparency • transparent layers • truth of perception • Tsai Chin Gillian Hills • Vanessa Redgrave • Vera Grafin von Lehndorff-Steinort • Veruschka von Lehndorff • whole is other than the sum of the parts • young lovers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2011

Animated décollage technique used to produce 'Capitu' title sequence

"Capitu is a Brazilian TV mini–series adaptation of 19th–century novelist Machado de Assis' work, Dom Casmurro. The story centres on an ageing man looking back on his life in an attempt to discover whether his best friend is the true father of his son, who he has raised with his wife, Capitu. De Assis' novel is now considered one of Brazil's most important Modernist texts and, in order to convey its radicalism, motion graphics studio Lobo looked to the Dadaist movement as inspiration for the TV show's opening titles and interstitials. The team referenced what several avant–garde artists called 'décollage', a process where–rather than building up an image through layering–cutting and tearing instead reveals layers of buried images."

(Patrick Burgoyne, 28 April 2009)

Fig.1 'Capitu' title sequence.

Fig.2 The making of 'Capitu' title sequence.

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19th century2008avant-gardeBrazil • Capitu • Carlos Bela • collagecut-up • cutting and tearing • Dada • decollage • design • Dom Casmurro • Globo Networks • illustrative styleinterstitialsjuxtapositionlayerlayering • Lobo • Machado de Assis • Mateus de Paula Santos • mini-series • Modernist texts • motion graphicspaper • Roger Marmo • title designtitle sequenceTVvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2008

The Logic of Hypermediacy

"Unlike a perspective painting or three–dimensional computer graphic, this windowed interface does not attempt to unify the space around any one point of view. Instead, each text window defines its own verbal, each graphic window its own visual, point of view. Windows may change scale quickly and radically, expanding to fill the screen or shrinking to the size of an icon. And unlike the painting or computer graphic, the desktop interface does not erase itself. The multiplicity of windows and the heterogeneity of their contents mean that the user is repeatedly brought back into contact with the interface, which she learns to read just as she would read any hypertext. She oscillates between manipulating the windows and examining their contents, just as she oscillates between looking at a hypertext as a texture of links and looking through the links to the textual units as language.

With each return to the interface, the user confronts the fact that the windowed computer is simultaneously automatic and interactive. We have argued that the automatic character of photography contributes to the photograph's feeling of immediacy, but with the windowed computer, the situation is more complicated. Its interface is automatic in the sense that it consists of layers of programming that are executed with each click of the mouse. Its interface is interactive in the sense that these layers of programming always return control to the user, who then initiates another automated action. Although the programmer is not visible in the interface, the user as a subject is constantly present, clicking on buttons, choosing menu items, and dragging icons and windows. While the apparent autonomy of the machine can contribute to the transparency of the technology, the buttons and menus that provide user interaction can be seen as getting in the way of the transparency. If software designers now characterize the two–dimensional desktop interface as unnatural, they really mean that it is too obviously mediated. They prefer to imagine an 'interfaceless' computer offering some brand of virtual reality. Nevertheless, the possibilities of the windowed style have probably not been fully explored and elaborated.

One reason that this style has not been exhausted is that it functions as a cultural counterbalance to the desire for immediacy in digital technology. As a counterbalance hypermediacy is more complicated and various. In digital technology, as often in the earlier history of Western representation, hypermediacy expresses itself as multiplicity. If the logic of immediacy leads one either to erase or to render automatic the act of representation, the logic of hypermediacy acknowledges multiple acts of representation and makes them visible. Where immediacy suggests a unified visual space, contemporary hypermediacy offers a heterogeneous space, in which representation is conceived of not as a window on to the world, but rather as 'windowed' itself –with windows that open on to other representations or other media. The logic of hypermediacy multiplies the signs of mediation and in this way tries to reproduce the rich sensorium of human experience. On the other hand, hypermediacy can operate even in a single and apparently unified medium, particularly when the illusion of realistic representation is somehow stretched or altogether ruptured. For example, perspective paintings or computer graphics are often hypermediated, particularly when they offer fantastic scenes that the viewer is not expected to accept as real or even possible. Hypermediacy can also manifest itself in the creation of multimedia spaces in the physical world, such as theme parks or video arcades."

(David Bolter and Richard Grusin, 33–34.pp, 2000)

David Bolter and Richard Grusin (2000). Immediacy, Hypermediacy, and Remediation. "Remediation: Understanding New Media", The MIT Press.

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bringing into relationcomputer graphicscomputer interfaceDavid Bolter • desktop interface • digital technologyframed by the window • graphic window • heterogeneity of contents • heterogeneous space • human experiencehypermediacyhypermediated spacehypertextilluminated manuscriptillusionistic spaceimmediacy • interfaceless interface • James Joycejuxtaposed imagesjuxtapositionlayered meaninglayeringlayers of data • layers of programming • logic of hypermediacy • looking at a hypertext • looking through links • manipulating the windows • mediated environments • multimedia spaces • multiplicities • multiplicity of windows • painting as illusionperceptual organisation • perspective painting • perspective viewphotographyphysical worldpictorial systemsrealistic representationrepresentational modesrepresentational strategiesrepresentational systemsRichard Grusinrupture • sensorium of human experience • signs of mediation • simultaneously automatic and interactive • technology as neutraltechnology transparency • textual units as language • texture of links • theme park • three-dimensional computer graphics • transparencytransparency of meaning • two-dimensional desktop interface • unified medium • unified visual space • unified wholeunifying metaphorvideo arcadevirtual realityvisual languagevisual literacyvisual representation • visual space • visual traditions • whole is other than the sum of the partswindow on to the world • windowed computer • windowed content • windowed interface

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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