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19 JANUARY 2016

Korean video gamers tend to play collectively (not individually)

"Indigenous video game culture creates a game space that Korean gamers use to construct their digital national identity. To Korean gamers, the concept of a digital Korea represents an imaginary space of Korean community where people play games together. Unlike gamers in the United States and Japan, whose gaming experience tends to be individualized, Korea's indigenous video game culture represents a new form of youth culture that allows young gamers to engage in social interaction through gaming with friends at PC Bangs. In this culture, entertainment happens at the moment when gamers are able to 'shout and play games together.' [29] This experience of social gaming creates a particular taste of gameplay that also leads to further immersion in a gaming narrative particular to most Korean gamers (Ok 2011). It is said that Korea is a mad gaming nation (Ahonen and O'Reilly 2007), and the country has the highest penetration rate for a single online game; 12 million South Koreans have driven a car in the Nexon online game Crazyracing Kartrider (2004). In addition to social gameplay within the Korean community, nation-building sentiments also arise in the context of Korean player-killing, where Korean gamers engage in social gaming on the international servers of an online game. [30] Thomas (2008) describes such gameplay as a cultural location that reflects existing racial tensions between Korean and American gamers. Similarly, political tension also appeared in a game massacre event, when Chinese gamers hacked into a Korean server and sparked mass killing between Chinese and Korean gamers in Legend of Mir II (2001).

On a macro level, gaming as a national pastime can be seen in the rapid spread of e-sports in all aspects of Korean society, and this e-sport culture is an indigenous gaming culture that receives support from the government, media institutions, and passionate gamers. E-sports have become recognized as an international sports phenomenon with their origins in Korea. With their emphasis on professional gamers, they have also become an emerging new media phenomenon, an international spectacle in video games (Jin 2010)."

(Mark J. P. Wolf, p.509)

Wolf, M. J. P. (2015). "Video Games Around the World", The MIT Press.

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TAGS

2015 • Chinese gamer • collective behaviourcollectivism • Crazyracing Kartrider • cultural location • digital national identity • e-sport culture • e-sports • game massacre event • gameplaygames research • gaming experience • gaming narrative • gaming nation • Hye Ryoung Ok • imaginary spacesimmersion • indigenous gaming culture • indigenous video game culture • international sports phenomenon • Jim OReilly • Korean community • Korean gamer • Korean society • LAN gaming • Legend of Mir 2 • Mark Wolf • mass collaboration • mass killing • multiplayer computer games • nation-building • national pastime • new media phenomenon • PC bang • people play games together • play games together • political tension • professional gamer • racial tensions • shared context • social gameplay • social gaming • social interaction • social interaction through gaming • South Korea • Tomi Ahonen • video game culture • youth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JUNE 2015

A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space

"In the opening pages of her classic essay, A Room of Ones Own, Virginia Woolf describes being blocked from entering the 'turf' of the University in Oxbridge by an administrative gate-keeper.

Instantly a man's figure rose to intercept me. … His face expressed horror and indignation. Instinct rather than reason came to my help, he was a Beadle; I was a woman. This was the turf; there was the path. Only the Fellows and Scholars are allowed here; the gravel is the place for me' (Woolf, 1929).

This scene invokes the ways in which women have been systematically barred from the digital playground, both as players and as creators of play space. To a large extent, the video game industry in the U.S. remains dominated by a boys-only ethos that harkens back to the gender-biased practices in the British academia of Woolf's day.[1] Games that are female-friendly are often couched in derogatory or dismissive terms: The Sims (Maxis, 2000) is 'not really a game'; casual games are not counted as 'real' games by many in the industry.[2] The result is that certain types of games, game mechanics, play patterns, and, as we'll see, particular types of game spaces have tended to dominate the field of games.

Although this paper discusses the ways in which digital game spaces have been strongly gendered towards male constructions of space and play, this does not necessarily mean we advocate creating exclusively female (or 'pink') games. As Woolf points out in her essay, the solution is not simply to create a distinctly feminine voice (although this is one potential angle of approach), but rather to promote the cultivation of an 'androgynous mind', which, she suggests, is already possessed by male authors of great note throughout history (she cites Shakespeare as an example). We propose drawing from a number of cultural practices, literary sources, and existing games in order to pave the way for a playground that is more open to female players. Thus we promote not only the definition of new feminine game spaces, but also encourage designers to think in terms of 'androgynous space' that engages all aspects of all persons: a space into which women and girls are invited and welcomed, but in which men and boys can also enjoy more diverse and nuanced forms of play than are typically available to them."

(Tracy Fullerton, Jacquelyn Ford Morie and Celia Pearce, "A Game of One's Own: Towards a New Gendered Poetics of Digital Space", The Fibreculture Journal : 11)

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TAGS

2008 • A Room of Ones Own (1929) • androgynous mind • androgynous space • boys-only ethos • British academia • casual gamesCelia Pearceconcepts of space • contested spaces • cultural practices • dangerous spaces • digital game spaces • digital playgrounddigital spacedolls house • domestic spaces • emotional space • enchanted worlds • female games • female players • female-friendly spaces • feminine conceptions of space • feminine game spaces • feminine voiceFibreculture Journal • game design as cultural practice • game mechanic • game spaces • games industrygames research • gender-biased practices • gendered spaces • gendered technology • gendered voices • gendering game space • Jacquelyn Ford Morie • male authors • male constructions of play • male constructions of space • MMOG • narrative spaces • nuanced forms of play • Oxbridge • pink games • play patterns • play spaces • poetics of digital space • procedural space • real games • regendered play space • regendering game space • secret places • social spacesThe Sims (2000) • Tracy Fullerton • video games industryVirginia Woolfvirtual spacesWilliam Shakespeare • women and games

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Where Else Can You Read about Games and Cultural Heritage?

Games and Culture – a subscription-based journal published by Sage with an emphasis on videogames and the social sciences; Games Studies – an open-access, international journal covering a variety of disciplinary (and occasionally, designer) perspectives; Eludamos – open-access, international, and multidisciplinary, ELUDAMOS makes forays into territory very familiar to Play the Past readers; Loading… – the official (open-access) journal of the Canadian Game Studies Association, Loading… often features articles that focus on videogames and narrative.

TAGS

academic journals • Canadian Game Studies Association • cultural heritage • Eludamos (academic games journal) • game studies • games and cultural heritage • games and culture • Games and Culture (academic games journal) • games research • Games Studies (academic games journal) • Loading... (academic games journal) • videogames and play

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 FEBRUARY 2011

Antlion Soccer: first-person gaming platforms for experimental narrative projects

"In early 2007, we were awarded a speculative research grant to investigate the use of first–person gaming platforms for experimental narrative projects. A small development studio has been established and has produced a completed single–user experience, based upon the Source engine. A second experimental single–player experience is at beta stage, and a third is planned. The completed mod embeds extensive, randomised narrative fragments in audio triggers throughout a bespoke environment. supplemented by abstract visual and audio media assets. [...] The second mod subverts traditional squad–based play by using custom fixed–state AI expansion of existing Half Life 2 agents to create an experience where the player becomaes leader of a helpless squad with discernible individual characteristics in a hostile environment. Although it is not envisaged that this will be completed at the time of presentation, a proof–of–concept demo will be on display. Finally, footage and information of an additional, multiplayer game developed to test mod concepts and already in the public domain will be displayed"

(Videogame Visionary)

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TAGS

2007AHRC • Antlion Soccer • applied researchconceptualisation • Dan Pinchbeck • demoDiGRAdiscoveryenquiryexperience • experimental narrative • experimentationfirst-personfootballFPSgame designgamesgames research • gaming platforms • Half-Life (video game) • mod • multiplayer game • narrativeposter presentationresearchsingle-player • single-user experience • speculative researchtheory building • vgvisionary • Videogame Visionary • virtual environments

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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