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Which clippings match 'Specification' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 OCTOBER 2013

Creating a Technical Specification

"A technical specification is a document that defines a set of requirements that a product or assembly must meet or exceed. A product or assembly that does not meet all of the specifically expressed requirements does not meet the specification, and often is referred to as being out of specification or 'out of spec.' Specifications are used when a contract for technical products or services is issued. The technical specification defines the requirements to fulfill the contract."

(WikiHow)

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TAGS

abbreviations • appropriately complex representation • business document • clarity of thought • closed specification • contractual requirements • description of realitydesign projects • detailed specification • direct sentences • explicit definitionsexplicit meaningexplicit objectives • general requirements • industry terms • jargon • open specification • operational criteriaoperational definitions • out of spec • out of specification • performance requirements • precision • product or assembly • product requirements • professional communication practices • project specification • quantification of variablesquantified measurement • required performances • requirements gatheringrequirements process • set of requirements • software engineeringspecification • technical product • technical requirements • technical specification • TLA

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2011

Digital Negative: Adobe's publicly available archival photo format

"Raw file formats are becoming extremely popular in digital photography workflows because they offer creative professionals greater creative control. However, cameras can use many different raw formats – the specifications for which are not publicly available – which means that not every raw file can be read by a variety of software applications. As a result, the use of these proprietary raw files as a long–term archival solution carries risk, and sharing these files across complex workflows is even more challenging.

The solution to this growing problem is Digital Negative (DNG), a publicly available archival format for the raw files generated by digital cameras. By addressing the lack of an open standard for the raw files created by individual camera models, DNG helps ensure that photographers will be able to access their files in the future.

Within a year of its introduction, several dozen software manufacturers such as Extensis, Canto, Apple, and iView developed support for DNG. And respected camera manufacturers such as Hasselblad, Leica, Casio, Ricoh, and Samsung have introduced cameras that provide direct DNG support."

(Adobe Systems Incorporated.)

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TAGS

2004AdobeAdobe PhotoshopAdobe Systems IncApplearchival • archival format • archival solution • archiving • authentic resource • camera manufacturers • Canto • Casio • complex workflows • creative professionalsdigital • digital cameras • digital image preservationdigital negative • Digital Negative (DNG) • digital photographyDNG • Extensis • Hasselblad • intellectual propertyinteroperability • iView • Leica • metadata • open raw image format • open standardpreservationpreserving digital imagesproprietary • proprietary format • RAWraw file • Raw file format • RAW files • raw formats • reverse engineeringRicohroyalty freeSamsung • software applications • solutionspecification • standard format • standardisationtechnologyTIFFusabilityworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 MARCH 2011

The top 10 major benefits of high-fidelity prototyping

"1) First and foremost, a high–fidelity prototype gives you something realistic enough to try out your ideas with target users and customers before making a significant investment. This lets you discover which ideas are good and which are not, and if the product has real value, and also discover if users can figure out how to use the product.

2) Doing a high–fidelity prototype helps you – even forces you – to think through your product to a much greater degree than paper specs.

3) A high–fidelity prototype enables and encourages the type of collaboration between product manager, interaction designer, and architect/engineer that is necessary to discover a valuable, useful and feasible product.

4) A high–fidelity prototype provides the level of information necessary for accurate engineering cost estimates, early in the process when these estimates are most useful.

5) A high–fidelity prototype provides the engineers and QA organization with a rich, interactive description of the product's intended functionality and design to be used as a reference basis for implementation and test.

6) A high–fidelity prototype provides the rest of the organization – marketing, sales, customer service, business development, company execs – with a useful understanding of the product to come early enough in the process that they have time to do their jobs properly.

7) A high–fidelity prototype prevents the classic waterfall problem of doing design after the requirements, rather than realizing that functionality and user experience are inherently intertwined.

8) If you do a high–fidelity prototype and you test your ideas with users and you find significant problems, you will have saved your company the cost in terms of time and money of building something that would have failed. Not to mention the opportunity cost of what the team could have been building.

9) If you do a high–fidelity prototype and validate this with target users, you will significantly reduce the time it takes for your developers to build the product both because the product is better defined, and also because you will have been forced to resolve many of the questions early that otherwise throw a wrench into development.

10) A high–fidelity prototype helps keep the focus of the team on the user experience."

(Marty Cagan, 29 April 2008)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2011

Semantic Web: integration through abstraction and standardisation

"The Semantic Web is about two things. It is about common formats for integration and combination of data drawn from diverse sources, where on the original Web mainly concentrated on the interchange of documents. It is also about language for recording how the data relates to real world objects. That allows a person, or a machine, to start off in one database, and then move through an unending set of databases which are connected not by wires but by being about the same thing."

(W3C)

TAGS

abstractionAPIbusiness rulescomputer sciencecontextconvergencedatadata accessdata contextdata integrationdata interchange • description resources • documentsenabling technologiesformatHTMLHTML5informationinformation retrievalintegrationinteroperabilitymachinesmetadataontologyorderingprotocol • R2RML • RDFreal world objects • Resource Description Framework • rule systemschemasemantic websolutionspecificationstandardisationstructurestructured datatechnologyunificationusabilityW3Cweb • XHTML5 • XML

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2008

W3C: standardising the web

"The W3C mission is to lead the World Wide Web to its full potential by developing protocols and guidelines that ensure the long–term growth of the Web. Below we discuss important aspects of this mission, all of which further W3C's vision of One Web."

(World Wide Web Consortium)

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TAGS

19941995adoption of standardsagreementARPAnetCERN • compatibility • computer scienceconsortium • core principles • DARPA • Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency • digital cultureEuropean Commission • European Organization for Nuclear Research • guidelinesHTML • incompatibility • inconsistency • industry members • information technology • INRIA • international communityInternet • Jeffrey Jaffe • knowledge management • LCS • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory • member organisations • MITnew medianew standardsone webontologypredictabilityprinciplesprotocolssemantic websoftware engineeringsolutionspecificationstandardisationstandards compliantstandards-based web technologiesstructurestructured datatechnologyTim Berners-Leeunificationusability • vendors • W3Cwebweb pagesweb standards • World Wide Web Consortium

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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