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17 APRIL 2014

Jean Tinguely: Art, Machines and Motion

"Jean Tinguely exhibited in a show titled 'Art, Machines and Motion' at the Kaplan Gallery, London, in November 1959. In conjunction with that exhibition, Tinguely held a conference and performance at the Institute of Contemporary Art on November 16 titled 'Static, Static, Static! Be Static!' During the event, 1.5 km of paper drawn by two cyclists on his meta–matic bicycle were spread through the audience while Tinguely read his theory of movement and machines simultaneously heard on radio in Paris."

(Rosemary O'Neill, p.159)

Rosemary O'Neill (2011). Total Art and Fluxus in Nice. "Art and Visual Culture on the French Riviera, 1956–1971: The Ecole De Nice", Ashgate Publishing Limited.

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1959abstract artanarchicart exhibition • Art Machines and Motion (exhibition) • auto-generateavant-garde artistsbicycleBritish Pathecontraptiondo-it-yourself • Ewan Phillips • generative artgenerative compositional techniqueInstitute of Contemporary Artsinteractive artironicJean Tinguely • Kaplan Gallery • kinetic sculptureLondonmachine aestheticmachinesmechanical device • meta-matic bicycle • meta-maticsmid 20th-centurymotion • movement and machines • moving machinesnewsreel • Nouveau Realistes • paperParisplayfulradiorobot artrobotised assemblagessculptorsculpture • speed sculpture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2011

Ballet Mecanique: a symbolic cinematic collage

"This film, the first declared 'sans scenario' in its text introduction, is a collage. The swinging chrome balls, the gears of machines, the dancing bottles, the rotating disks juxtaposed with femine lips and eyes are all awaiting the female form trudging endlessly up and down the stairs with her burden. The symbols seem obvious to us in an age of technology and sexual advertisement/liberation."

(Ben Howell Davis, 1988)

Ben Howell Davis (1988). "Ballet Mécanique", from Man Ray multimedia application as referenced in Multimedia Computing, Case Studies from Project Athena, Mathew Hodges and Russell Sassnet, eds, Chapter 9, pg 117.

Fig. 1–2 Fernand Léger "La Ballet Mécanique".

Fig.3 Fernand Léger, production still from "La Ballet Mécanique 1923–24, / 35mm, black and white and colour, mono, 14 minutes, France, French Intertitles (English Subtitles) / Directors: Fernand Léger, Dudley Murphy / Image courtesy: Institut Français

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1924 • age of technology • Alice Prin • avant-gardeavant-garde cinemaBallet Mecaniquechoreographycollage • Dudley Murphy • experimental cinemaFernand LegerfilmFuturism (art movement) • George Antheil • juxtaposition • Kiki de Montparnasse • machinesMan Raymotion designpatternrepetition • sans scenario • sequence designsexual innuendosymbolismvisual communicationvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2011

What Does It Mean To Become A Master?

"In the 1960's and 70's, the advent of computers not only reinforced this notion of man as a rational animal, it also led many people to predict that we would soon have machines that could think and act just like human beings. In 1972, however, Hubert Dreyfus's seminal and controversial book What Computers Can't Do anticipated the failure of what came to be known as 'artificial intelligence'.

In the book, Dreyfus explains that human beings are not at all like computers. We do not apply abstract, context–free rules to compute how to act when we engage in skilled behavior. Instead, Dreyfus argued, the fundamental thing about humans is that we are embodied beings living in a shared world of social practices and equipment. In the end, it is our skillful mastery and our shared practices that not only distinguish us from machines but allow us to assume meaningful identities."

(Tao Ruspoli, 2010)

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19722010 • a sense of wonder • a world full of meaning • abstract thoughtAlbert Borgmannartificial intelligence • Being in the World (film) • Charles Taylor • context-free rules • craftsmanshipcreative skills • embodied beings • exemplary figures • existential phenomenologists • existential philosophers • existentialism • flamenco master • godsheroes • Hiroshi Sakaguchi • Hubert Dreyfushuman being • Iain Thomson • jazz master • John Haugeland • Leah Chase • Lindsay Benner • living in a shared worldmachines • man as a rational animal • Manuel Molina • Mark Wrathall • Martin Heidegger • master carpenter • master chef • master juggler • masters • masterymeaning • meaningful identities • modern day masters • musical genius • rational animal • sacred • saints • Sean Kelly • shared practices • sinners • skilful masteryskillskilled behaviourskillful copingsocial practicessports stars • Tao Ruspoli • Taylor Carman • thinking machines • unique situation • What Computers Can't Do

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MAY 2011

Adam Curtis: the network ecology myth

"The new series, called All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace, takes complicated ideas and turns them into entertainment by the use of the vertigo–inducing intellectual leaps, choppy archive material and disorienting music with which all Curtis fans are familiar. The central idea leads Curtis on a journey, taking in the chilling über–individualist novelist Ayn Rand, former chairman of the Federal Reserve Alan Greenspan, the 'new economy', hippy communes, Silicon Valley, ecology, Richard Dawkins, the wars in Congo, the lonely suicide in a London squat of the mathematical genius who invented the selfish gene theory, and the computer model of the eating habits of the pronghorn antelope.

You can see why Zoe Williams once wrote that, while watching one of Curtis's programmes, 'I kept thinking the dog was sitting on the remote. ...'

Now he has moved on to machines, but it starts with nature. 'In the 1960s, an idea penetrated deep into the public imagination that nature is a self–regulating ecosystem, there is a natural order,' Curtis says. 'The trouble is, it's not true–as many ecologists have shown, nature is never stable, it's always changing. But the idea took root and spread wider–people started to believe there is an underlying order to the entire world, to how society is structured. Everything became part of a system, like a computer; no more hierarchies, freedom for all, no class, no nation states.' What the series shows is how this idea spread into the heart of the modern world, from internet utopianism and dreams of democracy without leaders to visions of a new kind of stable global capitalism run by computers. But we have paid a price for this: without realising it we, and our leaders, have given up the old progressive dreams of changing the world and instead become like managers–seeing ourselves as components in a system, and believing our duty is to help that system balance itself. Indeed, Curtis says, 'The underlying aim of the series is to make people aware that this has happened–and to try to recapture the optimistic potential of politics to change the world.'

The counterculture of the 1960s, the Californian hippies, took up the idea of the network society because they were disillusioned with politics and believed this alternative way of ordering the world was based on some natural order. So they formed communes that were non–hierarchical and self–regulating, disdaining politics and rejecting alliances. (Many of these hippy dropouts later took these ideas mainstream: they became the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs who decided that computers could liberate everyone and save the world.)...

He draws a parallel with those 1970s communes. 'The experiments with them all failed, and quickly. What tore them apart was the very thing that was supposed to have been banished: power. Some people were more free than others – strong personalities dominated the weak, but the rules didn't allow any organised opposition to the suppression because that would be politics.' As in the commune, so in the world: 'These are the limitations of the self–organising system: it cannot deal with politics and power. And now we're all disillusioned with politics, and this machine–organising principle has risen up to be the ideology of our age.'"

(Katharine Viner, 6 May 2011, Guardian)

Episode 1: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: Love and Power', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 23 May 2011
Episode 2: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: The Use and Abuse of Vegetational Concepts', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 30 May 2011
Episode 3: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: The Monkey In The Machine and the Machine in the Monkey', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 06 June 2011

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1960s1970sabstract modelabstractionAdam Curtis • Alan Greenspan • All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace • archive footageAyn RandBBC2Bill MurrayblogsCarmen Hermosillochange • commune • computer model • computer utopianism • confessional memoirs • control societyconvergencecounterculturecultural expressioncyberspacedemocracydigital cultureecologyemotions become commodified • Esther Rantzen • evolution • expressions of power • Facebookfreedom • Georgia • global capitalism • hierarchical structures • hierarchies • hierarchy • hippy communes • hippy dropouts • hyper-consumerismideologyideology of the timeindividualisminternet utopianism • Kyrgyzstan • Loren Carpenter • machines • Mayfair Set • mercantilist economy • modern world • natural order • network ecologynetworked societynetworksnon-hierarchical • non-hierarchical societies • orderingPongpopular culture • punchdrunk • reflexive modernisationRichard Dawkinsscientific ideasself-organising systemself-regulating • self-regulating ecosystem • selfish gene theory • Silicon Valleysocial experimentssocial mediasocialist realismsociety • Soviet realism • stability • stable order • Stakhanovites • structuresystems theorytechnology convergencetelevision documentary • TUC • TwitterUkraineunderlying orderunstable • Westminster • White House • Zoe Williams

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2011

Semantic Web: integration through abstraction and standardisation

"The Semantic Web is about two things. It is about common formats for integration and combination of data drawn from diverse sources, where on the original Web mainly concentrated on the interchange of documents. It is also about language for recording how the data relates to real world objects. That allows a person, or a machine, to start off in one database, and then move through an unending set of databases which are connected not by wires but by being about the same thing."

(W3C)

TAGS

abstractionAPIbusiness rulescomputer sciencecontextconvergencedatadata accessdata contextdata integrationdata interchange • description resources • documentsenabling technologiesformatHTMLHTML5informationinformation retrievalintegrationinteroperabilitymachinesmetadataontologyorderingprotocol • R2RML • RDFreal world objects • Resource Description Framework • rule systemschemasemantic websolutionspecificationstandardisationstructurestructured datatechnologyunificationusabilityW3Cweb • XHTML5 • XML

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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