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09 DECEMBER 2013

Goldsmiths Department of Art MA: Computational Aesthetics

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TAGS

2013algorithmic architecturecomputational aestheticscomputational arts • computational character • computational ordering • computational structures • computational systemscomputer artconceptual artcritical discoursedatabase as cultural formdigital aestheticsdigital artfine artGoldsmiths College (University of London)information systems • logico-mathematical means • Maria Beatrice Fazi • mathematicsmathesis • Matt Fuller • mediality • medium specificitymodern artmodes of existenceorder of thingsordering • present art • programmatic declaration • rule-based worksoftware studiessupermarketssystematisationtheory of substantial formsvideo lecturevisual art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Filippo Brunelleschi's (re)discovery of Linear Perspective

"When Brunelleschi (re)discovered linear prespective circa 1420, Florentine painters and sculptors became obsessed with it, especially after detailed instructions were published in a painting manual written by a fellow Florentine, Leon Battista Alberti, in 1435. John Berger, an art historian, notes that the convention of perspective fits within Renaissance Humanism because 'it structured all images of reality to address a single spectator who, unlike God, could only be in one place at a time.' In other words, linear perspective eliminates the multiple viewpoints that we see in medieval art, and creates an illusion of space from a single, fixed viewpoint. This suggests a renewed focus on the individual viewer, and we know that individualism is an important part of the Humanism of the Renaissance."

(Beth Harris and Steven Zucker, Smarthistory)

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1420 • 3D spaceAncient Greeceart historyEuropean Renaissance • Filippo Brunelleschi • fixed viewpoint • Florence • Giotto di Bondone • Greece • horizon line • illusionistic spaceindividualismJohn BergerKhan AcademyLeon Battista Alberti • linear perspective • mathesismedievalmedieval artmultiple viewpointsperspective viewrediscovered • Renaissance Humanism • Rene Descartessingle perspective point of view • Smarthistory (site) • vanishing point • viewpointvisual illusionvisual perspective • volumetric

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 MARCH 2005

Cabinets of Curiosity: ways of knowing through similitude

"The constitution of heterogeneity as a world of objects separate and distinct from the viewing subject. The 'heterogeneous' world is identifiable with the position of the objectivised subject during the Renaissance and that identification is organised through similitude into an homology between a viewing subject and a multifarious object world. If the classical age can be said to be about anything it is, as Foucault has shown, about the move away from ways of knowing through similitude to ways of knowing through mathesis and representation (Foucault, M.1989. The Order of Things). While we might take issue with the speed and degree of completion of this epistemic shift, representation as a way of knowing, as a form of gaze, comes to be constituted through the separation of the subject from the world and the development of an idea of material heterogeneity as something Other to that subject."

(Hetherington, Kevin. 1999 p.51–73)

Hetherington, K. (1999). "From Blindness to Blindness: Museums, Heterogeneity and the Subject". Actor Network Theory And After. J. Law and J. Hassard.

[Hooper–Greenhill's (quoted in Hetherington 1999) contention is that during the Renaissance the dominant approach to understanding was informed by ways of knowing through similitude. She contrasts this approach with ways of knowing through, what Foucault calls mathesis (Foucault 2003), and representation. Hooper–Greenhill's discussion is useful for understanding Western understanding's general shift after this period towards nomological strategies and the rise of Modernism. She presents her analysis in reference to the emergence of the cabinets of curiosity during the Baroque period in Europe which became the forerunners to the Modern museum and fine art galleries.]

Foucault, M. (2003). "The Order Of Things". London, Routledge: 156–158.

Hooper–Greenhill, E. (1992)." Museums and the Construction of Knowledge". Leicester, Leicester University Press.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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