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Which clippings match 'Social Phenomena' keyword pg.1 of 2
13 OCTOBER 2017

What is discourse analysis? by Dr Stephanie Taylor

Stephanie Taylor, NCRMUK, Published on 27 Mar 2015

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TAGS

2015academic researchacademic scholarship • AQMeN Centre • Cathie Marsh Centre • content analysisdata analysisdiscourse analysis • discursive resource • Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) • interpretive repertoire • methodological approaches • methodological research • National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM)NCRM • NCRMUK • research methodssocial phenomenasocial phenomenon • social product • social sciencesocial science research • social science research methods • Stephanie Taylor • talktext dataUniversity of EdinburghUniversity of ManchesterUniversity of Southamptonutterances

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2017

Understanding through Pictures versus an Understanding about Pictures

"When developing qualitative methods for the interpretation of pictures, it seems to be important not to explain pictures by texts, but to differentiate them from texts. Nevertheless, it seems equally important to develop common standards or methodological devices which are relevant for the interpretation of texts, as well as for the interpretation of pictures. Examples of common standards are: to treat the text as well as the picture as a self-referential system, to differentiate between explicit and implicit (atheoretical) knowledge, to change the analytic stance from the question What to the question How, to reconstruct the formal structures of texts as well as pictures in order to integrate single elements into the over-all context, and—last but not least—to use comparative analysis. The application or realization of these common standards and methodological devices in the field of the interpretation of pictures, however, has to be quite different from that of the interpretation of texts, if we intend to advance to iconicity as a self-contained domain, to its inherent laws and to its autonomy independent from texts."

(Ralf Bohnsack, 2008)

Volume 9, No. 3, Art. 26 – September 2008, Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research.

TAGS

Alfred Schutz • analytic mentality • atheoretical knowledge • Bildlichkeit • Charles Goodwin • communicative knowledge • comparative analysis • conjunctive knowledge • conversational analysis • cultural phenomena • documentary meaning • Documentary Method of Interpretation • empirical social sciences • Erving Goffman • Erwin Panofsky • ethnomethodology • formal compositional structure • Forum Qualitative Social Research • Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung • FQS • Gottfried Boehm • Hans Belting • Harold GarfinkelHarvey Sacks • hyper-ritualization • iconic meaning • iconicityiconography • iconology • image-based understanding • immanent meaning • interpretative methods • Karl MannheimKarl Popper • linguistic turn • literal meaning • Martin Heidegger • Max Imdahl • meaning image-based depictions • Niklas Luhmann • Peter BergerPierre Bourdieuplanimetric composition • Praxeological Sociology of Knowledge • qualitative methodsqualitative research • Ralf Bohnsack • research practiceRoland Barthes • self-referential systems • semantic structure • semiotics • sequence analysis • simultaneitysocial phenomenasocial realitysociologysociology of knowledgetacit knowledge • text interpretation • theory of action • Thomas Luckmann • transcontrariness • typification • Umberto Ecovideo analysis • visible phenomena

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2013

Qualitative Research: systematic observations of social behaviour with no preconceived hypotheses to be tested

"Qualitative research is concerned with nonstatistical methods of inquiry and analysis of social phenomena. It draws on an inductive process in which themes and categories emerge through analysis of data collected by such techniques as interviews, observations, videotapes, and case studies. Samples are usually small and are often purposively selected. Qualitative research uses detailed descriptions from the perspective of the research participants themselves as a means of examining specific issues and problems under study.

Qualitative research differs from quantitative research in that the latter is characterized by the use of large samples, standardized measures, a deductive approach, and highly structured interview instruments to collect data for hypothesis testing (Marlow, 1993). In contrast to qualitative research, in quantitative research easily quantifiable categories are typically generated before the study and statistical techniques are used to analyze the data collected. Both qualitative and quantitative research are designed to build knowledge; they can be used as complementary strategies."

(Ruth McRoy)

TAGS

ild knowledge • case studies • Christine Marlow • complementary strategies • data collection and analysisdeductive reasoning • descriptive validity reliability • detailed descriptions • enquiry and analysis • hypothesis testinginductive procedures • inductive process • large samples • nonstatistical methods • observations • problems under study • purposive selection • qualitative and quantitative research • qualitative research • quantifiable categories • quantitative researchresearch interview • research participants • Ruth McRoy • social phenomena • standardised measures • statistical techniques • structured interviews • themes and categories emerge • video (research method)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 AUGUST 2011

Density Design: a Politecnico di Milano research lab

"DensityDesign is a Research Lab in the design department (INDACO) of the Politecnico di Milano. It focuses on the visual representation of complex social, organizational and urban phenomena. Although producing, collecting, and sharing information has become much easier, robust methods and effective visual tools are still needed to observe and explore the nature of complex issues.

Our research aim is to exploit the potential of information visualization and information design and provide innovative and engaging visual artifacts to enable researchers and scholars to build solid arguments. By rearranging numeric data, reinterpreting qualitative information, locating information geographically, and building visual taxonomies, we can develop a diagrammatic visualization – a sort of graphic shortcut – to describe and unveil the hidden connections of complex systems. Our visualizations are open, inclusive, and preserve multiple interpretations of complex phenomena.

DensityDesign is committed to collaborating with other researchers and organizations devoted to academic independence and rigor, open enquiry, and risk taking to enhance our understanding of the world."

(DensityDesign, Design Research Lab)

Fig.1 "Cooperative Design Knowledge "

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2011

Space Syntax: quantitative analysis of relationships between spatial layout and social, economic and environmental phenomena

"The Space Syntax approach is both an architectural theory and a software–based toolkit for the planning, design and management of the built environment. The approach investigates relationships between spatial layout and a range of social, economic and environmental phenomena including patterns of movement, public space use, land use and crime distribution. Space Syntax theory and technology was pioneered in the 1970s by Prof Bill Hillier and colleagues at University College London.

Built on quantitative analysis and geospatial computer technology, the Space Syntax approach provides a set of evidence–based techniques for the analysis of spatial configurations of all kinds, especially where spatial configuration seems to be a significant aspect of human affairs, as it is in buildings and urban areas. Applied in both academic research and practice, Space Syntax theory and technology treats cities and buildings 'space first', that is as the network of spaces that people use and move through."

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architectural practice • architectural theory • architectural wayfinding • Bill Hillier • built environment • crime distribution • economic phenomena • environment design • environmental phenomena • evidence-based techniques • geospatial computer technology • human affairs • James Gibson • network of spaces • patterns of movement • phenomenal space • public spacepublic space usequantitative analysissocial phenomena • software-based toolkit • space first • space syntaxspatial configuration • spatial configurations • spatial layout • University College London • urban areas • urban planningwayfinding systems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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