Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Gulf War' keyword pg.1 of 1
18 OCTOBER 2016

HyperNormalisation: our retreat into a simplified version of the world

"The documentary is inspired by the unpredictable events of recent times – from the rise of Donald Trump to Brexit, the war in Syria, the endless migrant crisis, and random bomb attacks. It seeks to explain both why these chaotic events are happening, and why we and our leaders can't understand them. Curtis's theory is that Westerners - politicians, journalists, experts and members of the public alike - have retreated into a simplified, and often completely fake version of the world. But because it is all-encompassing, we accept it as normal.

HyperNormalisation explores this hollow world by looking back at 40 years of events, and profiling a diverse cast of characters such as: the Assad dynasty, Donald Trump, Henry Kissinger, Patti Smith, the early performance artists in New York, President Putin, intelligent machines, Japanese gangsters and suicide bombers."

(Holly Barrett, 22nd September 2016, Royal Television Society)

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TAGS

20169/11 • Acid Phreak (pseudonym) • Adam CurtisAfghanistan • AirBnB • Alexei Yurchak • Anthony GiddensArab Spring • Arkady Strugatsky • BBC documentary • BBC iPlayer • Boris Strugatsky • Brexit • British filmmaker • British National Front • Carl Rogers • cartoon villain • chaos • chaotic events • chatbot • civil rights movement • Corrupt (pseudonym) • cyber activism • cyberspace • Damascus • David Frost • Declaration of Independence in Cyberspace • delusion • digital rightsdisruptive innovationdocumentaryDonald Trump • Eli Ladopoulos • ELIZA (natural language processing) • fakeness • functioning society • Gulf War • HAC (pseudonym) • Hafez al-Assad • Henry Kissinger • hippies • hypernormalisation • HyperNormalisation (2016) • intelligent machines • internet utopianismIraq • John Barlow • John Lee • Joseph Weizenbaum • Judea Pearl • Julio Fernandez • late communist period • Lester Coleman • liability theory • Lionel Ritchie • machine fetishisation • Mark Abene • Martha Rosler • Masters of Deception (MOD) • migrant crisis • Muammar Gaddafi • Muslim Brotherhood • New YorkNigel FarageOccupy Wall Street • Outlaw (pseudonym) • paradoxPatti Smith • Paul Stira • performance artists • Phiber Optik (pseudonym) • powerlesspretence • random bomb attacks • retreat into simplified views of the world • Roadside Picnic (1972) • Ronald Reagan • Royal Television Society • Scorpion (pseudonym) • self-absorbed baby boomers • self-fulfilling prophecy • Soviet UnionStalker (1979)suicide bombersSyria • Tahir Square • techno-panic • techno-utopiaterrorism • time of great uncertainty • Timothy LearyTron • Uber • Vladimir PutinVladislav Surkov • War in Syria • Yakuza

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JANUARY 2015

The Emergency Broadcast Network

"EBN works to harness the power of multimedia audio–visual technology into the most effective electronic behavior control system.

EBN's techniques involve a collection and analysis of massive amounts of randomly recorded audio and video television programming. After a careful screening internal process, the choicest bits are chosen for inclusion in compositions using internal digital sampling and video editing in their own production facility."

(fUSION Anomaly, 12 January 2003)

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TAGS

1990s1991appropriationaudiovisual mash-upsauthor as editor • Brian Kane • cable televisioncritical reinterpretationculture jammingcut-up technique • digital sampling • driving beatediting through selection • Emergency Broadcast Network (EBN) • experimental video • Gardner Post • George Bush Snr • Greg Deocampo • Gulf Warhip-hop beatsinfluential video artists • Joshua Pearson • multimedia performance group • re-editre-purposerecombinantrepurposingRhode Island School of Designsampled footagespoken-word samplingstutter effecttelevision programmingVHSvideo collagevideo remix • video scratching • video turntablist • VJ

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2011

The evolution of Postmodernism

"On the way to postmodern, the struggle to reform modern capitalism's dark side, fragmented into a thousand strands. An era approach is rejected – dating the arrival of postmodernism is impossible as is the construction of a linear episodic narrative, moving from the premodern to the modern and then to postmodern. Instead postmodern methods, theories, and worldviews proliferate, as do modern and premodern ones. There are numerous postmodern approaches ranging from naive postmodernism (McPostmodernism) that hails the arrival of postindustrial and complex/adaptive organizations, Baudrillard's and Lyotard's versions of radical breaks from modernity, to others seeking more integration with critical theory. Some claim to have moved beyond postmodern to something called postpostmodern that would include hybrids (postmodern variants with modern and premodern), language 'heteroglossia' (the coexistence of many voices at the same time in tension with each other), and various 'dark side postmoderns' looking at global reterritorialization, postmodern war, postcolonialism and the ills of capitalism"

(David M. Boje, 2007)

1). Postmodernism – by David M. Boje (2007) To appear in Yiannis Gabriel's Thesaurus, London: Oxford University Press, forthcoming

TAGS

Bruno Latourcapitalismconsumption spectaclecritical theorycritiquedeconstruction • Douglas Kellner • episodic narrative • Fredric Jameson • Gibson Burrell • grand narrativesGulf WarGuy Debordheteroglossia • history of philosophy • iPodJacques DerridaJean BaudrillardJean-Francois LyotardJurgen HabermaslanguageLas Vegas • Linda Smircich • Marta B Calas • McDonalds • McPostmodernism • Michel FoucaultmodernismmodernityNietzscheNikePeter Druckerpost-structuralismpostindustrialPostmodernpostmodernismpremodernreterritorialisation • Steven Best • Stewart R. Clegg • Vietnam war • Wal-Mart • William Bergquist • World War IWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2006

Reconstructed Warfare to be Consumed Within the Safe and Controlled Vestiges of Home

"Godard has reserved the 'bedroom' as the primary site for consumption of contemporary Hollywood cinema. In Baudrillardian fashion, Ridley Scott's Black Hawk Down (2001) plays on a super–sized widescreen television at the foot of the bed: as a form of 'reconstructed' warfare to be consumed within the safe and controlled vestiges of home."

(Alex Munt, Macquarie University, Australia)

[Jean–Luc Godard's recent exhibition at the Pompidou Centre presents a commentary on the nature of cinema and its enduring interest despite its various transformations. He makes his commentary through the form of an installation sculpture arranged as three viewing rooms. The rooms represent three points in time: The Day before Yesterday; Yesterday; and Today. Interestingly works within the Today room seem to suggest a shift away from the practice of cinema being a collective viewing activity to being a private activity played out in domestic spaces.]

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TAGS

Alex Munt • bedbedroom • Black Hawk Down • Centre Georges PompidoucinemaconsumptionFranceGulf WarHollywoodhypermediacyJean BaudrillardJean-Luc GodardmediationreconstructionRidley Scottspectacle obfuscateswar
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