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Which clippings match 'Immigrant' keyword pg.1 of 2
10 APRIL 2017

The Story of Skinhead with Don Letts

"This thoughtful, troubling film from Don Letts shows how a joyful movement became hijacked by thugs and bigots. To the point where even the title of this programme will be off-putting to some. But the precursor to all the hooliganism was a teen obsession with Jamaican ska. Kevin Rowland recalls, 'We saw the Pioneers, we saw Desmond Dekker and we loved them. It was completely multiracial.' And Letts is at pains to celebrate both the fashion before the fascism – reflected in increasingly ugly 70s archive – and the style revival."

(Mark Braxton)

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TAGS

1960s • 2 Tone • BBC Four • British inner cities • British subculture • British youth culture • Caribbean music • clothing fashioncouncil estatecounterculturecultural codes • cultural collision • cultural signals • Desmond Dekker • disaffected youth • DJ Don Letts • Doc Martens • Don Letts • dressing up • Harrington jacket • identity performanceimmigrantinner city • Kevin Rowland • late 60s • mods and rockers • moral panic • multicultural harmony • nationalism • neo-nazism • Pauline Black • pop culturepunk rockracismreggaerockumentary • rude boy • rudeboy • Sex PistolsSham 69 • ska • skinheadstreet fashionsubcultureteddy boyteenage rebelliontelevision documentary • The Roxy (nightclub) • The Story of Skinhead (2016) • urban clothingworking class cultureyouth cultureyouth subculture • youth tribes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2013

The NFSA Life In Australia Series

Fig.1 James Jeffrey (1966). "Life In Australia: Adelaide": 20.25 Minutes. Made by The Commonwealth Film Unit / Department of Immigration 1966. Directed by James Jeffrey. A picture of life in the South Australian capital of Adelaide in the mid 1960s, social, commercial and recreational.
Fig.2 "Life In Australia: Brisbane", Fig.3 "Guide To Canberra", Fig.4 "Darwin – Doorway To Australia", Fig.5 "Life In Australia: Hobart", Fig.6 "Life In Australia: Melbourne", Fig.7 "Life In Australia: Perth", Fig.8 "Life In Australia: Sydney".

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TAGS

1960s1966Adelaideadvertising imagesaudio and visual heritageaudiovisual archiveAustralia • Australian capital cities • Australian culture • Australian Department of Immigration • Australian ScreenBrisbaneCanberracommercial sector • Commonwealth Film Unit • cultural life • Darwin • Eric Thompson • European Australianseveryday cultureGreat Britain • Hobart • idylidyllic imageimmigrantimmigration • James Jeffrey • life in Australia • Life in Australia Series • lifestyleMelbourneNational Archives of AustraliaNational Film and Sound ArchivenewsreelNFSAPerthportrait of everyday liferecreational activitiessocial sectorSouth AustraliaSydney • ten pound pom • ten pound tourist • UK • welcoming immigrants • white Australia policy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 FEBRUARY 2013

European Commission: the Migrants in Europe design competition

The deadline for submitting artwork is 21 June 2013.

"The multimedia Competition 'Migrants in Europe' aims to give young artists and communicators an opportunity to reflect on the contribution of migrants to the European society today. The Competition should also serve as a first step towards more debate, information and opinion exchange.

The Competition is aimed at students who are over 18 years old and enrolled in art, graphic and communication schools in all EU countries and Croatia. The schools are to present the works in three categories–Poster, Photography and Video. Each school can present one or several works in one or several categories. The works will be judged at the national level and the best works will be forwarded to a European jury that will decide on European winners. A public internet vote will also take place on this website. The authors of the 30 European finalist works will travel to Brussels to attend a prize–giving ceremony with expected participation by Cecilia Malmström, European Commissioner for Home Affairs. The schools whose students win first prizes in the three categories and the first prize in the public vote will receive an award of €10,000 each."

(European Commission)

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2013 • art and design competition • art and design students • Brussels • Cecilia Malmstrom • communication designcompetition • contribution of migrants • Croatiacultural changedesign competitionEUEuropean Commission • European jury • European society • graphic designimmigrantmigrant workers • Migrants in Europe • multimedia competition • photographyposter designposters • public vote • short video • visual artsyoung artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 AUGUST 2012

O Tamaiti: young boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings

"Sima Urale's debut short film, beautifully realised in black and white, tells the story of a young Samoan boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings. As his parents struggle in their new country, he is overwhelmed by the responsibility. When faced with his grief, the adults fail to recognise his pain. Poignant attention to details that convey a child's perspective (eg. the movement of a spacies game and shopping trolley are intercut) saw O Tamaiti win awards at film festivals around the globe, including the prestigious Silver Lion at Venice."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig. 1 Dir. Sima Urale, 15mins, NZ, 1996, black & white, 1.1:66

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TAGS

1996Aotearoa New Zealandarcade gameattention to detailAustralasiababyblack and whitechildrenchilds perspectivechurch • Coke machine • coming of age • cot death • deathdebutfamily • female filmmaker • hospitalimmigrant • Kara Paewai • kiwi short films • new baby • New Zealand • New Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on Screen • O Tamaiti • PacificPacific IslanderPolynesianpregnancySamoan • sensitive portrayal • shopping trolley • short filmsiblings • Sima Urale • socialsoundSpace InvadersspaciesThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Filmyoung boy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2011

Martin Scorsese: ItalianAmerican

"After having made four well–received feature films, among them Mean Streets (1973), an uncompromising story of petty criminals in New York City's Little Italy, and Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974), the tale of a single mother's journey to self–sufficiency, Martin Scorsese stepped back briefly from his commercial film career to make a small, deeply personal documentary. Shot on 16mm film in the Manhattan apartment where he grew up, ItalianAmerican is the record of a conversation between Scorsese and his parents, Charles and Catherine. In three–quarters of an hour, the three manage to cover a great deal of ground, most notably the parents' experiences growing up in the rough–and–tumble New York tenements during the early years of the twentieth century. Scorsese's presentation of his parents is highly particularized and subtly nuanced, yet he also manages to make their words speak for the larger immigrant experience. When the setting shifts from the living room to the dining room and everyone sits down to dinner, the mood becomes looser and more animated, with Scorsese and his mother moving into the kitchen for a quick lesson on how to make tomato sauce–or 'gravy,' as Catherine (and an entire generation of Italian Americans) would call it. Throughout, the affection that the three Scorseses have for each other is palpable, as is the respect with which the son presents his parents' story. At the end, Catherine's recipe for her tomato sauce scrolls by on–screen, making ItalianAmerican not only a historical record, but also a family legacy."

(The Museum of Modern Art)

1974. USA. 35mm print, colour, sound, 49 min. Original 16mm materials on indefinite loan from the artist. Preserved in 35mm with funding from the Celeste Bartos Film Preservation Fund.

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16mm1974authorship • Catherine Scorsese • Charles Scorsese • direct cinemadocumentary filmfilmimmigrantimmigrant experienceinterviewItalian • Italian American • Italianamerican (1974) • ManhattanMartin ScorseseNew Yorkpersonalpersonal filmrealismsocial historysocial realismsocial realitytruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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