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13 JUNE 2015

Corman's World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel (2011)

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2011 • Alex Stapleton • Allan Arkush • Anders Bramsen • b-moviebad taste • Bjarni Gautur • Bob Burns • Brett Ratner • Bruce Dern • Catherine Hardwicke • Clint Howard • Cormans World (2011) • Darren Lynn Bousman • David Carradine • David Crosby • Dick Miller • documentary • Eli Roth • Eric Balfour • exploitation films • Frances Doel • Francis Ford Coppola • Gale Hurd • Gary Tunnicliffe • Gene Corman • George Hickenlooper • Gregory Locklear • grindhouse • horror film genre • independent film • independent film producer • influential producer • Irvin Kershner • Izabela Frank • Jack NicholsonJames CameronJames Wan • Jeff Frey • Jim Wynorski • Joe Dante • John Sayles • Jonathan Demme • Jonathan Haze • Julie Corman • Kevin O Neill • life and career • Lloyd Kaufman • low-budget film • Marky Ramone • Martin Scorsese • Mary Woronov • Mickey Barold • Monte Hellman • Nancy Sinatra • Oliver Hecks • Pam Grier • Patrick Simpson • Paul Anderson • Paul Bartel • Penelope Spheeris • Peter Bogdanovich • Peter Fonda • Philip Owens • Polly Platt • Quentin TarantinoRichard Matheson • Robert De Niro • Roger Corman • Ron Howard • Sally Kirkland • sensationalismsexploitation • Stone Douglass • teensploitation • Timur Bekmambetov • Tom Sherak • Traci Lords • untasteful • Victor Livingston • William Shatner • writer-director-producer • young talent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 DECEMBER 2012

An interview with the film editor Thelma Schoonmaker

David Poland/The DP/30 channel: posted Thursday 1st December 2011

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2011American cinemaart and design practitionerscreative practice • David Poland • DP/30 channel • filmfilm editingfilm editorfilm industryfilmmakingfilmmaking process • Hugo (2011) • interviews with designersMartin ScorseseMichael Powellpost productionpractitioner interview • Shutter Island (2010) • storytellingtextual reference • the other side of the camera • Thelma Schoonmaker • women in filmwomen in the film industry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2011

Returning to Michael Powell's Peeping Tom after 15 years

"Peeping Tom has been widely celebrated as one of the great films about looking, about consumption, about cinema, about art, about the artist, about the relation between the artist, the artwork and the audience, about the relation between looking and pleasure, looking and desire, looking and death, and so on. All very familiar stuff from Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis and film studies (the film's tailor–made for film studies – bring in some Freud here, some Bataille and de Sade there, add a little Lacan and Virillio, etc). The aggressive and violating camera, as Scorsese put it. And this is partly the problem with Peeping Tom. Like the films of Peter Greenaway or David Cronenberg, Peeping Tom is more like an academic essay about voyeurism and scopophilia, a join–the–dots lecture on the pleasures, risks and dangers of art. Plus, Peeping Tom employs the most stereotypical, cliched thriller/ murder mystery plot you can imagine: a young man, a loner, a misfit, introspective, morbid, an outsider figure, abused as a child, etc etc etc, who murders sexualized women (prostitutes and actresses), and is befriended by an innocent he cannot bring himself to corrupt or kill.

Powell attacks the subject of voyeurism and murder aggressively in the opening scenes: the close–ups on cameras, projectors and eyes, the mirrors and reflections, exaggerated sounds (the rattle of a projector, a dripping tap, a heartbeat, whispered voiceover), and his love of visual rhymes and puns (eyes, drinks, sticks and tripods). You can see Powell having a ball in orchestrating his elaborate camera moves, his erotic, sleazy mise–en–abyme, his film–within–a–film tropes (Powell playing the murderer's father and torturer in home movies which he shot himself), the multiple reflections, mirrors, lenses, cameras, projections and screens (every shot in Peeping Tom seems to have been lit by a raking, unfiltered, unflattering horizontal light). It's not that Powell isn't at the top of his game in Peeping Tom – in its way, Peeping Tom is every bit as inventive as Powell's best work – it's that the plot, the characters, the situations are so cheesy, predictable, and shallow.

Despite all this, though, Peeping Tom does have bite and a nastiness which age hasn't dimmed. Peeping Tom also still feels 'contemporary' in its psychoanalytic treatment of a serial killer plot which draws on prostitution, cinema, acting, and pornography. And the conceit of having a murder in the opening shots which's replayed a moment later over the credits is a tour–de–force (one of the film's best cinematic ideas, this says everything necessary, and economically, in the first five minutes)."

(Jeremy Robinson)

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1960abuseaggressionartartistartworkaudienceBritish directorBritish film directorcameracinemaclicheclose-upconsumptionDavid Cronenbergdeathdesire • Emeric Pressburger • erotic • essayfilmfilm studies • film-within-a-film • Freudian • Georges Bataille • innocenceintrospectionJacques Lacan • join-the-dots • Leo Marks • loner • looking • Marquis de Sade • Martin ScorseseMichael Powellmirrormise-en-abymemisfitmorbidmurdermurder mysteryoutsider • Paul Virilio • Peeping Tom (film) • Peter Greenawaypleasurepornographyprojectorprostitutionpsychoanalysis • pun • reflectionscopophilia • scoptophilia • serial killer • sexualised • sleazy • stereotypethrillerUKviolation • visual rhyme • voyeurism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2011

Martin Scorsese: ItalianAmerican

"After having made four well–received feature films, among them Mean Streets (1973), an uncompromising story of petty criminals in New York City's Little Italy, and Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974), the tale of a single mother's journey to self–sufficiency, Martin Scorsese stepped back briefly from his commercial film career to make a small, deeply personal documentary. Shot on 16mm film in the Manhattan apartment where he grew up, ItalianAmerican is the record of a conversation between Scorsese and his parents, Charles and Catherine. In three–quarters of an hour, the three manage to cover a great deal of ground, most notably the parents' experiences growing up in the rough–and–tumble New York tenements during the early years of the twentieth century. Scorsese's presentation of his parents is highly particularized and subtly nuanced, yet he also manages to make their words speak for the larger immigrant experience. When the setting shifts from the living room to the dining room and everyone sits down to dinner, the mood becomes looser and more animated, with Scorsese and his mother moving into the kitchen for a quick lesson on how to make tomato sauce–or 'gravy,' as Catherine (and an entire generation of Italian Americans) would call it. Throughout, the affection that the three Scorseses have for each other is palpable, as is the respect with which the son presents his parents' story. At the end, Catherine's recipe for her tomato sauce scrolls by on–screen, making ItalianAmerican not only a historical record, but also a family legacy."

(The Museum of Modern Art)

1974. USA. 35mm print, colour, sound, 49 min. Original 16mm materials on indefinite loan from the artist. Preserved in 35mm with funding from the Celeste Bartos Film Preservation Fund.

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16mm1974authorship • Catherine Scorsese • Charles Scorsese • direct cinemadocumentary filmfilmimmigrantimmigrant experienceinterviewItalian • Italian American • Italianamerican (1974) • ManhattanMartin ScorseseNew Yorkpersonalpersonal filmrealismsocial historysocial realismsocial realitytruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JUNE 2009

Die entfesselte Kamera

"Eine Zusammenstellung der besten und berühmtesten langen Kamerafahrten muss natürlich mit Murnau beginnen. Hier das Treffen des Mannes mit seiner Geliebten in Sunrise (1927) [1] Der Banküberfall in Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, 1950), in einer einzigen Einstellung aus dem Auto gefilmt [2] Die Kamera aus der Ich–Perspektive ... Madame de ... (Max Ophuls, 1953) – nach dem Vorspann ab Minute 1:50 [3] Touch of Evil von Orson Welles (1958), mit der wohl so ziemlich berühmtesten Kamerafahrt [4] Godard ('Eine Kamerafahrt ist eine Frage der Moral.') und sein Weekend (1967) [5] Antonionis Beruf: Reporter (1975) [6] In den letzten zehn bis zwanzig Jahren werden extrem lange Kamerafahrten immer häufiger. Zum einen aufgrund der besseren technischen Möglichkeiten (die Steadycam gibt es seit Mitte der 70er Jahre, Antonioni musste für seine bahnbrechenden Aufnahmen in Beruf: Reporter noch komplizierte Konstruktionen zu Hilfe nehmen) – und zum anderen als Gegenentwicklung, als Ruhepol zu der immer höher werdenden Schnittfrequenz, die mit dem Musikclipsender MTV begann und jüngst mit den Batman– und Jason–Bourne–Filmen einen Höhepunkt erreicht hat. In Martin Scorseses Goodfellas (1990) folgt die Kamera Henry, wie er mit seiner Freundin über den Hintereingang einen Club betritt. Dabei wird unnachahmlich illustriert, welch privilegierte Stellung er genießt [7] Aus Murnaus entfesselter Kamera war zu diesem Zeitpunkt schon ein so beliebtes Stilmittel geworden, dass es Zeit für etwas Ironie wurde. Das zeigt die Anfangssequenz in Robert Altmans The Player (1992), in der sich zwei Darsteller über die besten tracking shots der Filmgeschichte unterhalten [8] Einige besonders kreative Höhepunkte sind seit den 90er Jahren im Genre des Hongkong–Thrillers zu finden. So in John Woos Hard Boiled (1992) [9] Die ersten sieben Minuten von Breaking News (2004) von Johnnie To [10] Ziemlich eindrucksvoll ist auch diese Szene aus The Protector von Prachya Pinkaew (2005) [11] Höhepunkt und Abgesang? In Joe Wrights Atonement von 2007 gerät die knapp fünfminütige Sequenz mit den Landungstruppen am Strand zu einem fast schon aufdringlichen Muskelspiel (ab 0:47) [12] Weitere Beispiele?"
(Thorsten Funke, 20. Juni 2009)

Films famous for their use of single continuous shots:
Sunrise (Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, 1927); Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, 1950); Madame de ... (Max Ophuls, 1953); Touch of Evil (Orson Welles, 1958); Weekend (Jean Luc Godard, 1967); Beruf: Reporter (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1975); Goodfellas (Martin Scorseses, 1990); The Player (Robert Altman, 1992); Hard Boiled (John Woo, 1992); Breaking News (Johnnie To Kei–Fung, 2004); The Protector (Prachya Pinkaew, 2005); Atonement (Joe Wright, 2007).

TAGS

19271950195319581967197519901992200420052007 • Atonement • Beruf Reporter • Breaking News (2004) • cinemadesign • F. W. Murnau • film • Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau • Goodfellas • Gun Crazy • Hard Boiled • Jean-Luc Godard • Joe Wright • John Woos • listMartin ScorseseMichelangelo AntonionionesingleshotOrson Welles • Prachya Pinkaew • Robert Altmansingle shotsteadicam • Sunrise • The Player • The Protector • Touch of Evil • tracking shotvisual languagevisual literacyvisualisationWeekend

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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