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Which clippings match 'Wandering Minds' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 JANUARY 2012

Tony Schwartz: The Myths of the Overworked Creative

"The only reserves that last are those we renew. This applies to us personally and ecologically.

Time is finite, but we act as if it were otherwise, assuming that longer hours always lead to increased productivity. But in reality our bodies are designed to pulse and pause – to expend energy and then renew it.

This is a long presentation, but it has many great insights – including the reminder that we are most effective, efficient and creative when we give absorbed attention to one thing at a time. Renewing and cultivating our personal energy is a key criteria for working at our full potential in the 21st century..."

(Nick Potter on 22 January 2012, Intersect)

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TAGS

21st centuryability to focus • absorbed attention • behavioural change • capacity • demand • distraction • effective • efficiencyenergy • expend energy • focus • fully rested • increased productivityinformation overload • multitasking • myths • overloadpause • personal energy • professional experiencepulse • pulse and pause • renew • rising demand • sleep deprive • task-shifting • the overworked creative • wandering mindswork • working

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 FEBRUARY 2011

The ability to focus is ever more important

"Before the Internet, most professional occupations required a large body of knowledge, accumulated over years or even decades of experience. But now, anyone with good critical thinking skills and the ability to focus on the important information can retrieve it on demand from the Internet, rather than her own memory. On the other hand, those with wandering minds, who might once have been able to focus by isolating themselves with their work, now often cannot work without the Internet, which simultaneously furnishes a panoply of unrelated information – whether about their friends' doings, celebrity news, limericks, or millions of other sources of distraction. The bottom line is that how well an employee can focus might now be more important than how knowledgeable he is. Knowledge was once an internal property of a person, and focus on the task at hand could be imposed externally, but with the Internet, knowledge can be supplied externally, but focus must be forced internally."

(David Dalrymple)

David Dalrymple, 'Knowledge Is Out, Focus Is In, and People Are Everywhere,' Edge, http://www.edge.org/q2010/q10_16.html#dalrymple

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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