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02 NOVEMBER 2014

Exhibition about the use of self-education as an emancipation tactic

Exhibition: "Really Useful Knowledge", 29 October 2014 – 9 February 2015 / Sabatini Building, Floor 1, Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid.

"The notion of 'really useful knowledge' emerged at the beginning of the 19th century alongside the workers' awareness of the need for self–education. In the 1820s and 1830s, working class organisations in the UK introduced this phrase to describe a body of knowledge that encompassed various 'unpractical' disciplines such as politics, economy and philosophy, as opposed to the 'useful knowledge' proclaimed by business owners who had previously begun to invest more heavily in their companies' progress through financing workers' education in 'applicable' disciplines like engineering, physics, chemistry and mathematics. In this reference to the long–forgotten class struggles of early capitalism, the title of the exhibition suggests an inquiry into 'really useful knowledge' from a contemporary perspective.

The exhibition endeavours to position the notion of critical pedagogy as a crucial element in collective struggles, and explore the tension between individual and social emancipation through education with examples that are both historical and current, and their relation to organisational forms capable of leading unified resistance to the reproduction of capital. In doing so, the exhibition highlights the collective utilization of public resources, action and experiments, either forgotten or under threat of eradication, taking the museum as a pedagogical site devoted to the analysis of artistic forms interconnected with actual or desired social relations."

(Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía)

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TAGS

19th century2014alternative educational models • authorised discourse • body of knowledgecapitalist structurescapitalist values • class struggles • collective action • collective struggles • critical pedagogy • early 19th century • early capitalism • early modern periodeducation and employmenteducation system • emancipation through education • everyday understanding • exhibition • folk knowledge • hegemonic discoursehegemony • historical models • inculcation of capitalist values • inculcation of values through education • individual emancipation • industrial educationindustrial model of educationknowledge is powerMadridMuseo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia • organisational forms • political actionpower and agencyproper • really useful knowledge • reproduction of capitalreproduction of social relations of production • self-education • social emancipation • social hierarchiessocial historytactical behaviour • unified resistance • unpractical disciplines • useful knowledge • workers education • working class • working class organisations

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 JANUARY 2013

The Qualitative Research Interview

"While all interviews are used to get to know the interviewee better, the purpose of that knowing varies according to the research question and the disciplinary perspective of the researcher. Thus, some research is designed to test a priori hypotheses, often using a very structured interviewing format in which the stimulus (questions) and analyses are standardised, while other research seeks to explore meaning and perceptions to gain a better understanding and/or generate hypotheses. This latter research generally requires some form of qualitative interviewing which encourages the interviewee to share rich descriptions of phenomena while leaving the interpretation or analysis to the investigators. The purpose of the qualitative research interview is to contribute to a body of knowledge that is conceptual and theoretical and is based on the meanings that life experiences hold for the interviewees. In this article we review different qualitative interview formats with a focus on the face–to–face, in–depth qualitative research interview and conclude with a discussion of related technical and ethical issues."

(Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree, 2006)

Barbara DiCicco–Bloom and Benjamin F. Crabtree (2006). "The Qualitative Research Interview", Medical Education, Volume 40, Issue 4, pages 314–321, Wiley Online Library

TAGS

a priori hypotheses • Barbara DiCicco-Bloom • Benjamin Crabtree • body of knowledge • disciplinary perspective • ethical issues • explore meaning • explore perceptions • face-to-faceface-to-face interview • generate hypotheses • in-depth interview • interpretationinterview (research method)interviewinginterviews • investigators • life experiences • qualitative data • qualitative interview formats • qualitative interviewing • qualitative interviewsqualitative research • qualitative research interview • researchresearch interviewsresearch questionrich descriptions • standardised data • structured interviewing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 FEBRUARY 2011

The ability to focus is ever more important

"Before the Internet, most professional occupations required a large body of knowledge, accumulated over years or even decades of experience. But now, anyone with good critical thinking skills and the ability to focus on the important information can retrieve it on demand from the Internet, rather than her own memory. On the other hand, those with wandering minds, who might once have been able to focus by isolating themselves with their work, now often cannot work without the Internet, which simultaneously furnishes a panoply of unrelated information – whether about their friends' doings, celebrity news, limericks, or millions of other sources of distraction. The bottom line is that how well an employee can focus might now be more important than how knowledgeable he is. Knowledge was once an internal property of a person, and focus on the task at hand could be imposed externally, but with the Internet, knowledge can be supplied externally, but focus must be forced internally."

(David Dalrymple)

David Dalrymple, 'Knowledge Is Out, Focus Is In, and People Are Everywhere,' Edge, http://www.edge.org/q2010/q10_16.html#dalrymple

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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