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05 DECEMBER 2013

Interaction Design Education Summit 2014

Wednesday, 5 February 2014, Utrecht School of the Arts (HKU) at Hilversum (http://interaction14.ixda.org/venues/).

"At a moment in time where everybody and everything is constantly interacting – through the use of networks, apps, products, media and services – educating students to design these interactions is not only needed, but also a fundamental challenge. Rapid developments in society and technology put increasingly high demands on the knowledge and skills of future interaction designers. Challenging traditional institutions, some companies have started programs for in–house training. At the same time, alternative educational platforms – such as edX, Udacity and Interaction–Design.org – are offering open access to high–level learning materials.

To successfully address these developments, interaction design education might need to reinvent itself."

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TAGS

2014alternative educational models • alternative educational platforms • Amsterdamapprenticeship • Daniel Rosenberg • Delftdesign educationdesign professionalsdesign schoolse-learning • educating students • education summit • edX • Fred Beecher • Gillian Crampton Smith • Hilversum • HKU Games and Interaction • HKU Hilversum • in-house training • interaction designInteraction Design Association (IxDA)interaction design educationInteraction Design Foundationinteraction designers • Interaction14 • interactions • interactive dialogue • IxDA • Jared Spool • knowledge and skillslearning materials • media and services • new forms of apprenticeship • online coursesonline education servicesonline learningonline portfolioonline presenceopen accessopen online coursesprofessional developmentrapid changethe future • traditional institutions • TU Delft Design for Interaction • UdacityUtrechtUtrecht School of the Arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
22 OCTOBER 2013

Nottingham Trent University: celebrating 170 years of art and design

"Our creative journey first began 170 years ago in 1843, with the opening of the Nottingham Government School of Design in the city. Driven by a growing need for design skills in regional industries, most predominantly in textiles and lace, 20 years of rapid evolution in art and design education followed."

(Nottingham Trent University)

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TAGS

170th anniversary • 1843 • 186319th century2014applied artsapplied craft and designart and designart and design educationart schoolscelebrationdesign educationdesign schoolsdesign studio educationGovernment School of Designindustrial artsJon Burgermanlacelace manufacturinglace-making • life drawing • NottinghamNottingham city • Nottingham Government School of Design • Nottingham Trent UniversityNTUpurpose-builttechnical collegeUKvocational training • Waverley building

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 FEBRUARY 2011

19th century design education funding central to the establishment of the UK creative industries

"The Industrial Revolution had established the United Kingdom as a world leader in manufacturing technology which had allowed British products to gain sizeable markets both at home and abroad. The early nineteenth century was to see those markets starting to be threatened by the establishment of free trade agreements between the UK and mainland Europe which allowed tariff concessions on the exchange of goods. European products began to compete alongside British products with increasing success which was attributed to their superiority in 'design' a feature it was felt that British products lacked.

The age of the 'foreign competitor' had arrived and British manufacturers seeing their livelihoods threatened became a powerful political lobby with the matter soon receiving Parliamentary attention. In 1835 Parliament called for a Select Committee to, 'Enquire into the best means of extending a knowledge of the Arts and the principles of Design among the people, especially the manufacturing population of the country.'(1835–6 Select Committee title)

The Committee investigated the situation taking evidence over a two year period 1835–6 with witnesses representing Art, Design, Industry and Education from both the UK and abroad. In 1836 it was to conclude that the successful continental countries were funding Design Education for their manufacturing industries while the UK was not. The Committee were to recommend that Parliament vote £10,000 to establish a Government School of Design in London with further annual funding to establish a network of provincial Schools in the major industrial centres of the country. It was hoped that as the Schools of Design as they became established would encourage the Applied Arts and Design and improve the aesthetic quality of British products thus influencing trade."

(Edward Bird, 2000)

Bird, E. (2000). "Research in Art and Design: the first decade", Working Papers in Art and Design Vol 1 Retrieved 15/02/2011 from http://sitem.herts.ac.uk/artdes_research/papers/wpades/vol1/bird2full.html ISSN 1466–4917

Fig.1 Roberts' Self–Acting Mule: sixty years later, the machine achieves the triumph of the factory system.

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TAGS

1835 • 1836 • 19th century • aesthetic quality • applied artsart and designcommoditycreative economycreative industriesdesigndesign educationdesign schoolseducation • Edward Bird • enterpriseEuropefactory • foreign competitor • free trade • Government School of Designindustrial centresindustrial educationindustrial revolutionindustrialisationindustryinnovationLondonmanufacturingmanufacturing industriesmanufacturing technologymass productionmechanisationpioneering • provincial schools • Select Committee • tradeUKWorking Papers in Art and Design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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