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11 OCTOBER 2016

Debate duets: Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump serenade each other

"The second US presidential debate was characterised by levels of vitriol never before seen on the US political stage.

But while millions of viewers across the world watched in horror as the Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton bloodied themselves over the Trump tapes, Clinton emails, tax, Syria and Obamacare, others saw the opportunity for humour.

Enter the memes.

The combination of microphones and roaming candidates, aided by the town hall-style of the debate in St Louis, proved fertile ground for imagining an alternate reality – one where Clinton and Trump were serenading each other.

As the debate ground on the #debatesongs hashtag spawned memes of the pair singing along to duets from Frozen, Grease and – probably most memorably – Dirty Dancing."

(Bonnie Malkin, 11 October 2016, Guardian Unlimited)

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TAGS

2016 • Bill Medley • culture jammingdebateDonald Trump • duets • Guardian UnlimitedHillary Clintonhumour • Jennifer Warnes • LuckyTV • mash-upparody • presidential debate • re-purposeremixrepurposing • Time of my life (1987)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 OCTOBER 2012

Concerning Intellectual Property: a conversation with Pat Aufderheide and Ellen Seiter (part four)

"In some ways, independent media–makers seem caught in the middle of this struggle, seeking ways to protect their own creative products, but also often at the mercy of bigger corporate interests. What do we gain by looking at the issues from their perspective?"

(Henry Jenkins)

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TAGS

best practicesbig media • codes of best practices • copyright • corporate interests • creative productsdebateDIY • Ellen Seiter • fair useHenry Jenkins • independent media makers • independent media-makers • indie mediaintellectual propertylawlegislationmonopoly • moral-panic • noncommercial creators • Pat Aufderheide • PIPApiracypolicyprotectionremixsocial consciousnessSOPA

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 APRIL 2012

Marshall McLuhan debates his ideas on Australian TV in 1977

"In June 1977 Marshall McLuhan visited Australia and was a guest on Monday Conference, a popular live ABC television show hosted by Robert Moore. McLuhan debated his ideas with Moore and took questions from a feisty studio audience made up of members of the media and advertising industry, including TV boss Bruce Gyngell (see Part One at 14 mins), and young, funky Derryn Hinch (see Part Two from 3 mins).

McLuhan had been brought to Australia to address a broadcasting conference organised by Sydney radio station 2SM, and the Monday Conference was broadcast from the ballroom of the Sydney Hilton Hotel.

Many in the audience clearly admired McLuhan who has well into his prime and at ease with the live television situation. The discussion covered an eclectic range of topics, from television, privacy and Richard Nixon to holograms, transcendental meditation, Jane Austen, Euclidean geometry, denim jeans and nude streaking.

Towards the end of the program the always unpredictable McLuhan can be heard just off–mic, saying to Moore, 'I'm terribly sorry, but I'm going to have to sneak off and have a pee!'."

(ABC Radio National, Australia)

Fig.1,2&3 Marshall Mcluhan, lecture recorded by ABC Radio National Network on 27 June 1977 in Australia.

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TAGS

1977 • 2SM • ABC Radio National (Australia) • ABC Radio National Network • advertising industry • age of anxiety • age of electronic media • anxietyAustraliaAustralian Broadcasting CorporationBionic Woman • broadcasting conference • Bruce Gyngell • Canadiancommunicationcool mediumdebate • denim jeans • Derryn Hinchdigital eraelectronic mediaEuclidean geometryfolk artglobal villagehologram • hot medium • information anxietyinformation revolution • interconnectivity • InternetJane Austenlecture • live television • loss of privacy • Marshall McLuhanmass media age • McLuhan Project • media • media industry • media theory • media visionary • mediummedium is the messagemessage • Monday Conference (show) • networked societynostalgic yearning • nude streaking • privacyradio stationRichard Nixon • Robert Moore • studio audienceSydney • Sydney Hilton Hotel • television • The McLuhan Project • thinker • transcendental meditation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2012

Open journalism: the newspaper is moving beyond a newspaper

"If the story of the Three Little Pigs broke today, how would a modern newspaper cover it? That's the concept behind a new TV ad for The Guardian, the newspaper's first major TV spot for 25 years.

The spot launches a campaign to promote the paper's 'open journalism' approach–its name for the way in which it is attempting to involve its readership in not just commenting on stories, but contributing to and even determining its news agenda. 'Open is our operating system, a way of doing things that is based on a belief in the open exchange of information, ideas and opinions and its power to bring about change,' said Alan Rusbridger, editor–in–chief of Guardian and MediaGuardian publisher Guardian News & Media. 'The campaign is designed to bring that philosophy to life for new and existing readers.'

The launch ad examines the way in which the tale of the Three Little Pigs might be covered by The Guardian today, with all the different forms of content and different channels that implies. It also seeks to get over the way in which stories develop over time as new facts come to light and the effect of social media on switching the focus of coverage and debate.

An epic two–minute version (shown above) debuted on Channel 4 last night.

Comparisons will inevitably be made with 1986's classic Points of View by BMP (indeed the Guardian itself has said that the new ad is a 'nod' to the old one. They share an endline: The Whole Picture).

But while Points of View got over its message succintly and elegantly, Three Little Pigs is less focussed, less pithy. This can be seen as a reflection of the changing nature of media–newspapers are now less about relating THE story and more about acting as a platform for multiple strands around a topic to be explored by multiple participants, including the readers themselves, in real time. But it makes for a less memorable piece of advertising storytelling.

'The aim is to reach progressive audiences and show them why they should spend time with us,' according to Andrew Miller, chief executive of the Guardian's parent company Guardian Media Group. But you have to wonder whether such progressive types would not be aware of what the Guardian is doing anyway? The ad will probably make existing Guardian readers feel better about themselves, but will its slightly daunting complexity attract many new ones?"

(Patrick Burgoyne, 1 March 2012, Creative Review)

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TAGS

adadvertisersauthorityauthorship • Bartle Bogle Hegarty • BBH (advertising agency) • bloggingcitizen journalismcoverageCreative Review (magazine)debate • depth of coverage • digital firstdigital publishingend of printjournalismmediamedia convergencemedia landscapemedia paradigm shift • news editor • newspaperold media • open journalism • open software • printprint mediaprint publishingpublishingpublishing model • range of coverage • readershipThe GuardianThe Whole Picture • Three Little Pigs • traditiontransformationtruth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 FEBRUARY 2011

UK Protection of Freedoms Bill - Public Reading Stage

"On Friday 11th February 2011, the Coalition Government published the Protection of Freedoms Bill. ... Some of the measures came from the 14,000 ideas left on the Your Freedom website.

The Government is committed to continuing this public engagement with the content of the Protection of Freedoms Bill. This website gives you the opportunity to comment on each clause contained in the Bill. Your comments will get collated at the end of this public consultation and fed through directly to the Parliamentarians who will carry the Bill through the House of Commons (go to the Parliament website to learn about the passage of a bill). These comments will assist and challenge MPs, aiding their scrutiny and debate on the details of the Bill. This is a pilot for the 'public reading stage' that the Government wants to introduce to give the public an increased say in all bills"

(UK Cabinet Office, 2011)

TAGS

2011agency • Big Society • coalition governmentconsultationdebatedecision makingdemocracydiscussionengagementengaging citizensGovernmentHouse of Commonsparticipationpilot projectpolicypolitical engagementpolitics • Protection of Freedoms Bill • publicpublic consultationpublic decision-making • public engagement • Public Reading StagePublic Reading StageUK • UK Cabinet Office • website • Your Freedom website

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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