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06 MARCH 2015

Sexed up: theorizing the sexualization of culture

"This paper reviews and examines emerging academic approaches to the study of ‘sexualized culture’; an examination made necessary by contemporary preoccupations with sexual values, practices and identities, the emergence of new forms of sexual experience and the apparent breakdown of rules, categories and regulations designed to keep the obscene at bay. The paper maps out some key themes and preoccupations in recent academic writing on sex and sexuality, especially those relating to the contemporary or emerging characteristics of sexual discourse. The key issues of pornographication and democratization, taste formations, postmodern sex and intimacy, and sexual citizenship are explored in detail."

(Feona Attwood, 2006)

ATTWOOD, F. (2006). Sexed up: theorizing the sexualization of culture. Sexualities, 9 (1), 77-94.

TAGS

2006Anthony Giddens • attitudes to sex • auto-eroticism • Brian McNair • Brigid Costello • casual sex • Catharine Lumby • commercial sex services • consumption spectacle • contemporary sexual discourse • cybersex • David Bell • David Buckingham • David Evans • Debbie Stoller • Dennis Altman • diverse sexual identities • Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim • email affairs • erotic life • Eva Illouz • excitation • female sexualityfemininity • Feona Attwood • gender relations • hedonism • Hilary Radner • Imelda Whelehan • intimate relations • Jane Arthurs • Jane Juffer • Jeffrey Weeks • Jon Binnie • Joseph Bristow • Juniper Wiley • Kenneth Plummer • liquid love • literature review • Mandy Merck • Marcelle Karp • Marj Kibby • Mark Jancovich • Michel Foucault • Natasha Forrest • obscenityonline datingpersonal life • personal relationships • phone sex • physical pleasure • physical sensation • plastic sexuality • pornographication • postmodern sex • radical sexual politics • renewable pleasures • romantic encounters • romantic relationships • Rosalind Gill • Rosalind Given-Wilson • Sara Bragg • sex and commitment • sex and reproduction • sex toysexismsexual behaviour • sexual citizenship • sexual commodification • sexual democratisation • sexual desire • sexual discourse • sexual encounter • sexual experience • sexual fitness • sexual identities • sexual intimacy • sexual meaning • sexual objectification • sexual obscenity • sexual practices • sexual preoccupation • sexual propriety • sexual regulation • sexual representation • sexual sensibilities • sexual subjectification • sexual values • sexualised culture • sexualised depictionssexuality • sexualization • sexually explicit texts • Sheffield Hallam University • SHURA • Simon Hardy • Stacy Gillis • taste formations • transient pleasures • Ulrich Beck • Walter Kendrick • William Simon • Zygmunt Bauman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2011

Show or tell? Opportunities, problems and methods of the exhibition as a form of research dissemination

"The European Academy of Design took a pioneering step in their 1999 biennial conference by including an exhibition of 'practice–based research'. This was refereed in the same way as conventional papers and a number of interesting exhibits were produced, demonstrating a diversity of work and connections between the methods and aims of the exhibitors and those of conventionally published research. In fact the conference award for 'best paper' (on a vote by all delegates) went to one of the exhibitors. Unfortunately the EAD exhibition did not result in a permanent record of the research thus 'published' so the exhibits did not contribute to the recorded body of knowledge and provided no exemplars for future researchers.

A further problem with the EAD exhibition, held in England, was that all the exhibits originated in the UK. Given the difficulty of transporting exhibition materials over long distances, it was reasonable to assume that the format inhibited international contributions and this was reinforced at the 2001 EAD conference in Portugal where exhibits were invited but only one was forthcoming (a graphic design exhibit from Australia) possibly because the ideas of practice–based research were less prevalent in the host country.

Against this background, the Design Research Society decided to include an exhibition in their 2002 Conference, 'Common Ground', held at Brunel University in England. This was an experimental activity and there was uncertainty about whether suitable research exhibits would be forthcoming, how to referee them and how to provide a permanent record. However it was felt that this experiment needed to go further than the preceding EAD venture and make a permanent contribution to our understanding of this form of dissemination. "

(Chris Rust and Alec Robertson, 2003)

1). RUST, C. and ROBERTSON, A. (2003). Show or tell? Opportunities, problems and methods of the exhibition as a form of research dissemination. In: Proceedings of 5th European Academy of Design Conference, Barcelona, April 2003.

TAGS

199920012002 • Alec Robertson • artistic practiceBrunel University • Chris Rust • conferencecontribution to knowledgecreative practiceDesign Research SocietydisseminationEADenquiryEuropean Academy of Designexhibition • experimental activity • future researchers • international contributions • permanent contribution • permanent record • pioneeringPortugalpractice-based research • published • published research • recorded body of knowledge • refereed • research • research exhibits • research outputSHURAUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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