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Which clippings match 'Scholarly Journals' keyword pg.1 of 1
03 MAY 2012

Knowledge Unlatched: a new academic publishing business model

"The Problem: specialist books in the Humanities and Social Sciences (including but not exclusively monographs) are under threat due to spiralling prices and reduced library funds.

Access is restricted: while academics could choose to bypass existing publishers and just post content on the Web, the general consensus within academia is that they would prefer to have their books professionally published.

Only a few hundred copies make it into the eight to twelve thousand research universities, and very few teaching universities have access to these materials. For many individuals private purchase is beyond their reach.

A Possible Solution: cover the costs of creating the first digital copy through a library consortium and make the titles open access. Publishers would continue to generate additional revenues from the sale of print, ePub and PDFs in bespoke formats."

(Frances Pinter, 2011)



2011academiaacademic journals • academic publishing • academics • bespoke format • Bloomsbury Academicbookcontent on the webdigital convergencedigital copyeconomic changeepub • Frances Pinter • groupon • humanities and social sciences • journal subscription • knowledge access • knowledge economy • Knowledge Unlatched • library consortium • long form • long form publication • longform • longform publication • media landscape • monograph • new business modelsnew digital distribution networksold mediaopen accessPDFpeer review • professionally published • publicationpublisherpublishingpublishing model • reduced library funds • research universities • sale of printscholarly journals • specialist books • spiralling prices • teaching universities


Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2011

Communicating knowledge: How & why UK researchers publish & disseminate their findings

"The motivations that lead researchers to publish in different formats–particularly in scholarly journals–differ significantly across disciplines. Researchers in the sciences are more likely to see publication in a learned journal as a 'natural' means of communication with their desired audience, while their colleagues in engineering, the humanities and the social sciences are more likely to see it as meeting essentially external requirements for research assessment and career advancement.

In these latter disciplines, therefore, the rise of journals is more closely associated with an environment where there is increasing emphasis on measuring, assessing, and evaluating research, its outputs and impact."

(HEFCE on behalf of JISC, UK, 2009)



2009academic journalsassessmentaudience • career advancement • disciplinedisseminationfindingshumanitiesJISCjournal articleknowledgelegitimation • means of communication • measurementperformativityposterposter presentationpublicationpublishingRAEresearch • research assessment • research culture • research evaluation • research impactresearch outputresearcherscholarly journalssciencesocial sciencesUK


Simon Perkins

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