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22 FEBRUARY 2011

Antlion Soccer: first-person gaming platforms for experimental narrative projects

"In early 2007, we were awarded a speculative research grant to investigate the use of first–person gaming platforms for experimental narrative projects. A small development studio has been established and has produced a completed single–user experience, based upon the Source engine. A second experimental single–player experience is at beta stage, and a third is planned. The completed mod embeds extensive, randomised narrative fragments in audio triggers throughout a bespoke environment. supplemented by abstract visual and audio media assets. [...] The second mod subverts traditional squad–based play by using custom fixed–state AI expansion of existing Half Life 2 agents to create an experience where the player becomaes leader of a helpless squad with discernible individual characteristics in a hostile environment. Although it is not envisaged that this will be completed at the time of presentation, a proof–of–concept demo will be on display. Finally, footage and information of an additional, multiplayer game developed to test mod concepts and already in the public domain will be displayed"

(Videogame Visionary)

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TAGS

2007AHRC • Antlion Soccer • applied researchconceptualisation • Dan Pinchbeck • demoDiGRAdiscoveryenquiryexperience • experimental narrative • experimentationfirst-personfootballFPSgame designgamesgames research • gaming platforms • Half-Life (video game) • mod • multiplayer game • narrativeposter presentationresearchsingle-player • single-user experience • speculative researchtheory building • vgvisionary • Videogame Visionary • virtual environments

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2011

Communicating knowledge: How & why UK researchers publish & disseminate their findings

"The motivations that lead researchers to publish in different formats–particularly in scholarly journals–differ significantly across disciplines. Researchers in the sciences are more likely to see publication in a learned journal as a 'natural' means of communication with their desired audience, while their colleagues in engineering, the humanities and the social sciences are more likely to see it as meeting essentially external requirements for research assessment and career advancement.

In these latter disciplines, therefore, the rise of journals is more closely associated with an environment where there is increasing emphasis on measuring, assessing, and evaluating research, its outputs and impact."

(HEFCE on behalf of JISC, UK, 2009)

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TAGS

2009academic journalsassessmentaudience • career advancement • disciplinedisseminationfindingshumanitiesJISCjournal articleknowledgelegitimation • means of communication • measurementperformativityposterposter presentationpublicationpublishingRAEresearch • research assessment • research culture • research evaluation • research impactresearch outputresearcherscholarly journalssciencesocial sciencesUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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