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23 JULY 2012

CETIS: JISC Pedagogical Vocabularies Review

"The JISC Pedagogical Vocabularies project was a short study, managed by CETIS, to scope the potential for identification, development and use of pedagogical vocabularies for the UK post–16 and HE communities. After a period of data gathering and community consultation, a Working Group of experts from various sectors and communities developed two reports along with recommendations to JISC that will be used to inform future development in this area, in collaboration with JISC partners."

(Joint Information Systems Committee, UK)

1). Pedagogical Vocabularies Review, which inventories existing pedagogical vocabularies, including flat lists, taxonomies, thesauri, ontologies and classification schemes, relevant to the UK post–16 and HE education sectors, with reference to current work in Europe. Final Draft, 23rd December 2005.

TAGS

2005 • capturing vocabularies • Centre for Educational Technology Interoperability Standards • CETIS • classification schemes • community consultation • current standards • data gathering • developing vocabularies • e-learning • existing pedagogical vocabularies • flat lists • funding policy • HE communities • investment policy • JISC • JISC partners • Joint Information Systems CommitteelearningLMS • managing vocabularies • ontologies • pedagogical vocabularies • Pedagogical Vocabularies Review • pedagogypost-16project scopestrategic planningtaxonomiesTEL • thesauri • UK • vocabularies • vocabulary capturing methodologies • vocabulary capturing technologies • vocabulary management technologies • vocabulary management technologies review • vocabulary specifications
06 DECEMBER 2011

Design for enabling sustainable livelihoods in communities

"This paper focuses on how designers can contribute to enabling sustainable livelihoods in communities, especially communities of people with physical disabilities. This is a new area of design research and practice. The paper draws on a case study of the role and contribution of designers in one of the most disadvantaged communities in a semi–urban area of Thailand between 2007 and 2010. This was a collaborative project with nineteen community members with physical impairment in the Samutprakran province. This community had a long history of developing crafts for income generation. The aim was to explore and test new approaches that would result in a model leading to alternative livelihoods, including transforming their capabilities and using available resources in their community to achieve positive outcomes. Participatory Action Research (PAR), Human–Centered Design (HCD) and Sustainable Livelihoods Approach (SLA) were employed as research strategies and approaches. The project was structured around three workshops targeting three successive stages: 1) recruiting participants for a case study and facilitating the gathering of their own data and doing the necessary analysis; 2) enabling them to create and make their own choices to improve their situation; and 3) monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of the implementation. There were four key findings. Firstly, the community participants stated that they had achieved the livelihood goals that they desired. They also devised a complementary income–generating activity which enabled them to continue to improve their capabilities, earn income and reinforce their value in their community, and to reduce their vulnerability. From the researcher's perspective, PAR integrated with HCD and combined with SLA were shown to be effective strategies and approaches because they facilitate the transfer of knowledge to the participants, giving them both incentive and ownership in their ideas and actions, enabling them to create and pursue their own solutions. Finally, this study demonstrated the benefits of reorientation of the designer's role from that of a solution provider to that of an agent of sustainable change."

(Siriporn Peters, 4 May 2011)

2). Siriporn Peters (2011). "Design for enabling sustainable livelihoods in communities", Iridescent: Icograda Journal of Design Research ISSN 1923–5003.

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TAGS

academic journal • alternative livelihoods • capabilities • case studycommunity • community participants • community-generated content • complementary income-generating activity • craftdata gatheringdesign research • design research and practice • disabilitydisadvantaged communitiesHCDhuman-centred design • income generation • livelihood • livelihood goals • ownershipPARParticipatory Action Research • people with physical disabilities • physical disabilities • physical impairmentresearch and practiceresearch approachesresearch strategies • semi-urban • SLA • sustainability • sustainable change • sustainable livelihoods • sustainable livelihoods approach • Thailandtransfer of knowledgetransformationvulnerabilityworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MAY 2011

Effective and evocative research: difference through the form and outcomes of the iterative cycles and the type of feedback that informs the reflective process

"From the differences we have described, it might be assumed that the distinction between effective and evocative research is between the analytical and intuitive. However, it is important to note that, while analysis of the problem and context tends to come first in effective research, as in all research, it is intuition that leads to innovation. And, on the other hand, while evocative research may evolve intuitively through the interests, concerns and cultural preoccupations of the creative practitioner, it is rounded out and resolved by analytical insights.

Because of this combination of the intuitive and analytical, both ends of the spectrum may draw on bodies of theory such as Donald Schön's (1983) theories of reflective practice and principles of tacit knowledge and reflection–in–action, to frame an iterative development process. However, differences can be identified between the form and outcomes of the iterative cycles and the type of feedback that informs the reflective process.

In effective research, an iterative design process may involve an action research model and prototyping (paper prototype, rapid prototype, functional prototype and so on). Each iterative stage is evaluated through user testing by a representative group of end users (through quantitative or qualitative surveys or observations of use, for example). The purpose of this testing is to gauge the artifact's functionality, usability and efficacy. The gathered data informs changes and refinements in each cycle.

On the other hand, an artist might stage a number of preliminary exhibitions, but these are not staged to gather 'data', or to obtain successively closer approximations of a solution to a problem. Instead, they are part of an exploration of unfolding possibilities. Feedback might be sought from respected colleagues, and gathered in an informal setting (in the manner of a peer 'critique'). The purpose of gathering such insights is to allow the artist to reflect upon the project and its evocation and affect and to see their work through the insights of others, which may shed new light on the practice and its possibilities."

(Jillian Hamilton and Luke Jaaniste, 2009)

2). Hamilton, J. and L. Jaaniste (2009). "The Effective and the Evocative: Practice–led Research Approaches Across Art and Design". ACUADS: The Australian Council of University Art & Design Schools, Brisbane, Queensland, Queensland College of Art, Griffith University.

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TAGS

action research model • ACUADS • analysisanalytical processart and designartistic practice • Australian Council of University Art and Design Schools • conceptualisationcontextcreative practitioner • cultural preoccupations • data gatheringDonald Schon • effective research • evocative researchexegesisexhibitionsexploration of unfolding possibilitiesfeedbackfine artfunctional prototype • gathering insights • insightintuitionintuitiveiterative design processiterative developmentJillian Hamilton • Luke Jaaniste • observationpaper prototype • peer critique • postgraduate supervisionpractice-led research • problem analysis • prototypingqualitative methods • qualitative surveys • quantitativereflection-in-actionreflective practicereflective processresearch artefactresearch designtacit knowledgetestingtheory buildingvisual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2011

Fleshmap: Studies of Desire

"Fleshmap is an inquiry into human desire, its collective shape and individual expressions. In a series of studies, we explore the relationship between the body and its visual and verbal representation.

Touch investigates the collective perception of erogenous zones. We asked hundreds of people to rank how good it would feel to touch or be touched by a lover in different points of the body. The resulting images reveal a map of sensual desire with multiple focal points and islands of excitement. Read more about our method.

While Touch examines collective patterns, Look explores individuality and the hidden surprises that each body reveals when bared. Through a process of abstraction, the piece reveals the multiplicity of formal possibilities contained in a single body part. Contours from different individuals are presented in collections that expose both familiar and oft–overlooked patterns, confronting prototypical notions of ourselves. Read more about our method.

Listen investigates the relationship between language and the body. Verbal manifestations of human physicality in music, poetry, and religion are distilled to their basic elements. In a play with language, the 'body rebus' emerges as a visual representation of cultural expressions of the physical in us."

(Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg)

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TAGS

abstractionAmazon.comapplied researchartistic practicebody • body parts • body rebus • collective patterns • collective portrait • conceptualisationcreative practice • crowdsource • cultural expressions • data gatheringdesirediscovery • Dolores Labs • enquiry • erogenous zones • experimentationFernanda Viegas • Fleshmap • human body • human desire • individual expressions • individualitymap • Martin Wattenberg • Mechanical Turk • perceptionphysicality • sensual desire • touch • verbal representation • visual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2011

A methodological discussion of email interviewing

"This article summarizes findings from studies that employed electronic mail (e–mail) for conducting indepth interviewing. It discusses the benefits of, and the challenges associated with, using e–mail interviewing in qualitative research. The article concludes that while a mixed mode interviewing strategy should be considered when possible, e–mail interviewing can be in many cases a viable alternative to face–to–face and telephone interviewing. A list of recommendations for carrying out effective e–mail interviews is presented."

(Lokman I. Meho, 2006)

Meho, Lokman I. E–Mail Interviewing in Qualitative Research: A Methodological Discussion. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 2006, vol. 57, n. 10, pp. 1284–1295.

TAGS

2006data collectiondata gatheringdata gathering instrumentse-mail • e-mail interviewing • e-mail interviewselectronic mailemail interviewingemail interviewsface-to-face interviewinterview (research method)interviewing • Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology • Library and Information Science (LIS) • LIS • mixed mode interviewing • online asynchronous interviews • online synchronous interviews • qualitative research • qualitative research method • research methodsocial and cultural phenomena • telephone interview • telephone interviewing • unstructured interviews

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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