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Which clippings match 'Arts Practitioner' keyword pg.1 of 1
01 JULY 2014

The art object does not embody a form of knowledge

"In this paper, I start from the position that the proper goal of visual arts research is visual art. An alternative position is that the art making process yields knowledge that is independent of the actual art objects produced. However, this relegates the art object to that of a by–product of the knowledge acquisition process, and, in my view, places visual art making in the service of some other discipline. Notwithstanding the fact that valuable knowledge may be acquired in this way, from my standpoint it would be undesirable for this to become the dominant mode of arts research. Therefore, from my position the most interesting proposition to explore is the claim that the art object is a form of knowledge since it locates the art object as a central and fundamental component of the knowledge acquisition process.

Nevertheless, as you will see, in this paper I argue against this proposition. I will not claim that the visual art object cannot communicate knowledge–it can. Instead, I will argue that this knowledge is typically of a superficial nature and cannot account for the deep insights that art is usually thought to endow into emotions, human nature and relationships, and our place in the World, etc. In short, I aim to demonstrate that visual art is not, nor has it ever been, primarily a form of knowledge communication; nor is it a servant of the knowledge acquisition enterprise."

(Stephen Scrivener, 2002)

Scrivener, Stephen (2002) "The art object does not embody a form of knowledge". Working Papers in Art & Design – Vol 2.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
07 NOVEMBER 2012

Journal for Artistic Research: a focal point for diverse artistic voices

"Introducing a high–quality journal in the field allows an ever–increasing number of artistic researchers to partake in what for the sciences and humanities are standard academic publication procedures. Given that artistic research has become a worldwide movement with many local activities, JAR can serve as a focal point, bringing together diverse voices, facilitating the discourse and thus improving the artistic research community.

In the context of JAR, artistic research is doubly defined: insofar as it is research, it enhances knowledge and understanding; because it is artistic, however, the mode of presentation is essential. This definition excludes works of art that share modes of presentation with artistic research, but do not enhance understanding. It also excludes research that is not dependant on an artistic mode of presentation. Thus, the development of epistemological as well as artistic criteria for the exposure of artistic research is a key ambition of the Journal; part of JAR's mission is to re–negotiate art's relationship to academia and the role and function of research in artistic practice. Furthermore, JAR embraces research practices across disciplines, thereby emphasising the transdisciplinary character of much artistic research.

JAR's unique presentation of artistic research as 'weaves', instead of 'pages', facilitates multi–modal exposition, thereby meeting the desire of artistic researchers to have their work displayed and documented in a manner that demonstrates a respect for modes of presentation. By introducing, together with the RC, a standard for documentation, the Journal is responding to the international artistic and academic communities, which demand high quality referencing and documentation. Moreover, the Journal meets the need of art institutions such as museums, galleries and collections for artistic research to be more easily accessible."

(Michael Schwab)

Fig.1 Deborah Harty and Phil Sawdon (2010). "humhyphenhum: Still 5".

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TAGS

academic journalart and design researchart exhibitionart galleriesart museum • artistic mode of presentation • artistic practiceartistic research • artistic research community • artistic researchersarts institutionsarts practitionerarts researcharts researcherepistemological criteriafine art collections • high quality referencing • high-quality informationJAR (journal)Journal for Artistic Researchknowledge and understanding • modes of presentation • multi-modal exposition • Research Catalogue (service) • research practices • research requirementsSociety for Artistic Research (SAR)transdisciplinary research • weaving metaphor • weaving together

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 SEPTEMBER 2012

Cultural Olympiad UK East Midlands: World Event Young Artists

"World Event Young Artists (WEYA) is the first of its kind and will take place in the cultural city of Nottingham, England in September 2012.

This global event will showcase a selection of the best international creative talent, across a spectrum of artforms, in one city, providing an opportunity for 1000 artists from 100 nations to join together and share their creativity on an international platform.

The World Event will be a chance for international exchange on a global scale, bringing the city to life; it is as much about intercultural dialogue across political borders as it is about the practice of young artists.

This unique combination of factors will ensure an unforgettable experience for all who take part and its audiences. Its public programme and web resources will offer space for collaborative development, workshops, debates and symposiums across a mixture of structured and informal settings. Artists will take part in workshops and interactive engaging sessions which will be delivered by an exciting range of creative individuals and artform specialists, exclusively tailored for young artists of the 21st century.

This once in a lifetime event will thrive on discussion and collaboration with like minded artistic talents from across the globe and aims to encourage future partnerships.

World Event Young Artists 2012 is hosted by UK Young Artists and supported by Arts Council England, Cultural Olympiad East Midlands, Nottingham Trent University and Nottingham City Council."

(World Event Young Artists 2012, UK)

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TAGS

2012artartform • artform specialists • artforms • artistic practiceartistic talentartistsArts Council Englandarts festivalarts practitioner • Ayanna Witter-Johnson • collaborative development • contemporary artcontemporary art symposiacreative individuals • creative partnerships • creative talent • creative workshops • creativity • Cultural Olympiad • debatesfine arts • intercultural dialogue • international creative talent • international exchange • international platform • NottinghamNottingham City CouncilNottingham Trent UniversitysymposiumUK • UK Young Artists • visual arts • WEYA • workshops • World Event Young Artists • young artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MAY 2011

The Purpose and Focus of Research for Costumes

"One of the greatest challenges for any practitioner in the performing arts is to create a believable and completely honest 'world of the play,' no matter how abstract or obscure it might be to the modern eye. A costumer's overarching objective is essentially to create forms of clothing that are appropriate to any and every type of character, taking into account not only the obvious variables of nationality, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, gender, sexual orientation and creed, but also those of geography, climate, occupation, familial and/or marital status, physiology, personality, psychological state, ideology, historical milieu and so forth. ...

Evocative research, the most liberating form of research for a costumer, is found all around us. This form of research, includes the visual arts but expands to encompass highly abstract art, music, nature, fantasy, film, language, demography and sociopolitical perspectives. Used by directors, actors and designers alike, it creates a basic vocabulary of concept and style upon which to begin discussions of production design. For example, one of the first discussions regarding a play or opera might be the director bringing to the table a piece of music or a painting that to them conveys the mood and spirit they are looking to evoke in the production. For example, a painting by Gustav Klimt might have a specific palette and a detailed use of texture and pattern that evoke key emotions from the director and serve as an excellent springboard for a stylized concept. A director could even bring in a list of adjectives that describes his or her response to the play, and a production team would be expected to visually interpret these words. It is the combination of evocative and factual research that brings focus, cohesiveness and consistency to a production design. Finding fundamental themes or through–lines upon which to base the clothing of the characters therefore allows the designer to create a more controlled environment and a more unified aesthetic."

(Linda Pisano, Timeless Communications September 2010)

Fig.1 Gloria Swanson in the ruins of the Roxy Theatre. Eliot Elisofon. New York City, October 14, 1960. © Time, Inc.

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TAGS

actorsartistic practicearts practitioner • basic vocabulary • believability • brings into focus • characterclothingcohesiveness • colour palette • consistencycostume design • costumer • demographydesignerethnicityevocative research • factual research • fashionform of research • forms of clothing • fundamental themes • key emotions • list of adjectives • nationalityoperapatternperforming artsproduction design • production team • response to the play • socio-politicalsocioeconomic status • sociopolitical perspectives • stylised concept • texturetheatre designer • theatre director • theatre productiontheatrical play • through-line • unified aesthetic • visual artsvisual interpretation • world of the play • world of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JANUARY 2011

Practice vs praxis: modelling practitioner-based research

"Praxis, for me, involves the critical and inextricable meld of theory and practice. Thus practitioner–based research is concerned with processes for theorising practice ... In moving creatively into our practice we are fundamentally concerned to develop new knowledge, to challenge old beliefs and to speculate on the 'what ifs' of our concepts and processes. For the arts practitioner, this new knowledge is made in the context of and challenge to the history, theory and practices of the relevant field. The research function for developing and extending knowledge is judged on the outcome of the research, which synthesises, extends or analyses the problematics of the discipline. It is important to realise that this creative work resembles pure and applied research in any field. As Richard Dunn says; 'a work of art or design is embedded in or deforms the theory and practice of the discipline' (1994:8)."

(Robyn Anne Stewart, 2003, USQ ePrints)

1). Stewart, Robyn Anne (2003) Practice vs praxis: modelling practitioner–based research. In: 2002 International Society for Education through Art (InSEA) World Congress, 19–24 Aug 2002, New York, USA.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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