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19 SEPTEMBER 2014

QSR International: NVivo 10

"If you want to get an edge by better understanding the explosion of unstructured data in the world today, you need NVivo - powerful software for qualitative data analysis. Whether you are working individually or in a team, on Windows or Mac, are new to research or have years of experience, there's an NVivo option to suit you."

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TAGS

audio analysis • content analysisdata analysis • data analysis software • data collection and analysisdocumentary materialinterview (research method)non-textual documentary material • NVivo • NVivo 10 • NVivo Server • primary sourcesQSR Internationalqualitative analysisqualitative data analysis • qualitative data analysis software • teaching resourcetranscriptunstructured datavideo interviews

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JUNE 2013

How to Cite Interviews

"Interviews are a useful means of obtaining information from individuals who have been directly involved with the topic or period one is researching. Such individuals are 'primary sources' who can provide data or perspectives which may not be available from other sources. Individual interviews are normally used to establish or support particular points in a paper; a series of structured interviews may also comprise an entire 'original research component' of a paper if they form a coherent body of new information on the research topic."

(University of Tampere, 22 January 2012)

TAGS

academic citation • book interviews • broadcast interviews • chat interviews • citation • citing electronic sources • citing interviews • citing print sources • coherent body of knowledge • data collectione-mail interviewselectronic media • electronic sources • Gerard Hopkins • individual interviewsindividual perspectives • instant messaging interviews • interview (research method)interviews • live broadcast interviews • magazine interviews • MLA • Modern Language Association • new information • original research • personal interviewsprimary sourcesprint media • published interviews • radio interviews • research paperresearch sourcesresearch topicstructured interviews • telephone interviews • television interviews • University of Tamperevideo interviews • webcast interviews

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2012

The Confluence of Digital Journalism and Digital Humanities

"I've increasingly felt that digital journalism and digital humanities are kindred spirits, and that more commerce between the two could be mutually beneficial. That sentiment was confirmed by the extremely positive reaction on Twitter to a brief comment I made on the launch of Knight–Mozilla OpenNews, including from Jon Christensen (of the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford, and formerly a journalist), Shana Kimball (MPublishing, University of Michigan), Tim Carmody (Wired), and Jenna Wortham (New York Times).

Here's an outline of some of the main areas where digital journalism and digital humanities could profitably collaborate. It's remarkable, upon reflection, how much overlap there now is, and I suspect these areas will only grow in common importance."

(Dan Cohen's Digital Humanities Blog)

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TAGS

academic disciplinesarchive • archivists • audiencebig data • blog posts • common platforms • common tools • communication platformconfluence • content management systems • convergencecrowdsourcingcultural technologyDan Cohen • data standards • developersdigital humanitiesdigital journalismdigital media • digital research • disciplinary fields • DocumentCloud • Drupal • high-quality writing • historical archivesinfrastructureJenna Wortham • Jon Christensen • journalism • Kindle Singles • Knight Foundation • Knight-Mozilla OpenNews • librarians • long-form journalism • Mozilla • MPublishing • museum professionals • New York Times • news organisations • novel functionality • Omeka • open source softwareopen web • OpenNews • platformsprimary sources • pro-am • Shana Kimball • short-form scholarship • social mediasoftware developersStanford University • techies • technologists • Tim Carmody • TwitterUniversity of Michiganweb standardsWired (magazine)WordPress • writers and researchers • Zotero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JANUARY 2011

OSA: actively collecting, preserving, and making openly accessible documents related to recent history and human rights

"The Open Society Archives (OSA) at Central European University is an archival laboratory. While actively collecting, preserving, and making openly accessible documents related to recent history and human rights, we continue to experiment with new ways to contextualize primary sources, developing innovative tools to explore, represent, or bridge traditional archival collections in a digital environment. Our approach to acquisition is increasingly proactive and inclusive, and we actively seek out non–traditional material, material previously marginalized based on its content, social origin, or form. At OSA Archivum, professional archival work is integrated with public programs, and our Galeria Centralis serves as the focal point of exhibitions, performances, film screenings, lectures, and seminars. Through all of these endeavors, we advocate: open access and transparency in public administration; equal rights to information; the ethical use of private data; open formats and open standards; and broad access to cultural heritage."

(The Open Society Archives, Hungary)

TAGS

archival laboratory • archival work • archive • broad access to cultural heritage • Central European University • collectcollectioncontextcontextualisationcultural formscultural heritagedigital culturedigital environment • equal rights to information • ethical use of private dataethics • Galeria Centralis • Hungaryinformation in contextintegrationknowledge commons • non-traditional material • old mediaopenopen access • open formats • Open Society Archives • open standards • OSA • OSA Archivum • preservationprimary sources • recent history • social construction of knowledgesocial constructionism • social origin • traditional archival collections

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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