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Which clippings match 'Choreographies For Camera' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 DECEMBER 2014

Zbigniew Rybczynski: New Book

"The screen is divided into nine different squares. Each representing one place. The uniting element of all the actions is a book passed from one hand to the other. All stories run parallel, as if in realtime, yet linked in a linear way at the same time through the narrative of the action."

Fig.1 Zbigniew Rybczyński (1975). "Nowa Książka (New Book)", 35mm short film, 10:26, SMFF Se–Ma–For Lodz, Poland.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 AUGUST 2013

Busby Berkeley: choreographing the epic visual spectacle

"Berkeley's choreography is important less for its movement of the dancers than for its movement of the camera. To overcome the limitations of sound stages, he ripped out walls and drilled through ceilings and dug trenches for his film crews. When a desired effect could not be accomplished with traditional film equipment, he had his budget expanded to include costs for developing custom rigs. His innovations explored ideas that the stationary camera could not. He wanted to take the audience through waterfalls and windows. He wanted lines of dancers to fall away to reveal scenery that in turn would fall away to expose an even larger setting. His dreams were big, but his determination to see them actualized was even bigger.

Even his worst attempts resulted in eminently watchable movies of exhilarating movement, but his best efforts produced startling effects that bordered on surrealistic dream states. In the quintessential Berkeley films Footlight Parade (1933) and 42nd Street (1933), cameras mounted on tracks are sent soaring past a multitude of dancing legs, flailing arms and orchestra instruments. In all, he directed more than twenty musicals, including an underwater sequence with aquatic star Esther Williams."

(Scott Smith, 6 February 2013, Keyframe)

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TAGS

42nd Street (1933) • aesthetic spectacleBusby Berkeleycamera angle • camera movement • camera rig • choreographic imaginationchoreographies for camerachoreographydance • dance productions • dancers • dancing legs • design formalismentertainment spectacle • Esther Williams • figures in space • flailing arms • Footlight Parade (1933) • geometryglamourgroupingkaleidoscopelegs • Lloyd Bacon • mirrored effectmovementmusical (genre)perspective viewscenerysound stage • stationary camera • surrealist stylesymmetry • underwater sequence • visual designvisual effectsvisual spectaclevisual spectacular • waterfa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 AUGUST 2012

Stroke: an individual struggles against a dehumanised mass

"Christine Jeffs made her directing debut with this lush, high end (35mm film, Dolby sound) short film. Dorothy (Fiona Samuel), a lone swimmer, luxuriates in tranquil bliss at a deserted pool – only to have her solitude rudely interrupted by a squad of swimmers. A wordless, strikingly choreographed conflict ensues as Dorothy attempts to assert herself against the dehumanised aggression of the swimmers. Stroke was invited to international festivals including Cannes and Sundance; and Jeffs went on to direct feature films Rain and Sunshine Cleaning."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig.1 Christine Jeffs (1994), "Stroke" (short film excerpt) Aotearoa New Zealand, 35mm 8 minutes.

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TAGS

199435mmAotearoa New Zealand • assertiveness • Australasia • choreographed conflict • choreographies for camerachoreographychoreography of conflict • Christine Jeffs • dehumanisation • dehumanised aggression • Fiona Samuel • kiwi shortkiwi short filmskiwi shortsmoving imageNew Zealand on ScreenNZ On Screennz short film • Robin Laing • short filmsportswimmerswimmingThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Film • tranquillity • wordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JANUARY 2011

Choreocinema: The Very Eye Of Night

"A Study in Choreography for the Camera is the film in which [Maya] Deren achieved an epistemological break from dance films that only 'recorded' movement. The new form was called 'choreocinema'. This form was a unique contribution to the advancement of experimental and ethnographic film. In fact, Deren called Ritual and Transfigured Time and The Very Eye of Night 'choreographies for camera'."

(Moira Sullivan, 2007, Danscamdanse: Dancefilm International Festival Belgium)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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