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Which clippings match '2011' keyword pg.1 of 30
13 FEBRUARY 2017

Window to the World: a speculative augmented reality experience

"In a concept project, Toyota Motor Europe and the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design envision car windows as touchscreens that allow passengers to interact with the passing scenery.

Dubbed the 'Window to the World,' the glass would be used like an Etch-a-Sketch toy, where riders can trace objects they see outside to create a drawing. They would also be able to see a zoomed view of distant objects or gauge their distance from the vehicle."

(Los Angeles Times, 23 July 2011)

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2011augmented reality experience • augmented reality technology • award winnerscar • car window • children • condensation • Copenhagen Institute of Interaction DesignCore77doodle • draw pictures • drawing with your finger • Etch-a-Sketch • fingersglass • interactive canvas • Kansei Design Division • kids • long journeys • new theoretical technology • passengers • shapesspeculative designToyota • Toyota Motor Europe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 AUGUST 2016

Jenny Lam: Design, Startups, and Good Luck Charms

"Jenny Lam speaks about the shift from designers who service clients to designers who are makers, leaders, and creators."

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2011agency cultureAIGA • Chief Experience Officer (CXO) • client and agencyconference presentation • CreativeMornings • design consultants • design discipline • design entrepreneurship • design professiondigital publishingdisruptive innovatione-publishingebooksexperience designJenny Lammakers of thingsOReilly MediastartupsUser-Centred Design (UCD)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 MARCH 2016

Graham Gibbs: coding in qualitative data analysis

"Extracts from a lecture by Graham R Gibbs to postgraduate (graduate) students about thematic coding in qualitative data analysis. It includes a look at Alan Bryman's four stages of coding, the idea of thematic coding and what themes can be about, what coding can be used for and how to construct and use a coding hierarchy."

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2011 • Alan Bryman • code hierarchy • code list • coding categoriescoding schemescontent analysisconventional content analysisdata analysis • framework analysis • Graham Gibbsgrounded theoryhumanities researchhumanities research methodology • idiographic focus • Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) • Jane Lewis • Jane Ritchie • Jonathan Smith • Nigel King • psychological qualitative research • qualitative analysisqualitative researchqualitative research techniqueteaching resource • template analysis • text datathematic analysis • thematic coding • thematic patternsUniversity of Huddersfieldvideo lecture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 FEBRUARY 2016

Hominid: an animated short film teaser

Written and Directed by Brian Andrews; Animation Supervisor: Joe Daniels; Lead Character Technical Director: Rodney Brett; Character Technical Director: Omar Garcia, Rob Garcia, Andrew Manuel; Story Artist: Janine Labar; Animation: Jason Alas, Brittany Barnes, Denice Dehelean, Andrew Manuel, John Treleaven, Tim Xenakis; Shading: Vincent Jaramillo, Matthew Picasso; Modelling: Pedro Ferreira, Dakota Fulmer, Sam Hedberg, Abraham Rodriguez, Joshua Roth, Darrell White; Compositing: Kyle Greenberg, Nate Rodriguez; Dynamic Effects: Tyler Giusti; Sound Design: Bryan Atarama, David Claudio; Composer: Jordan Suhr; Title Design: Adrian Amler, Patches, Angela You; Thanks to: Andrew Dayton, Adrian Miller, John Scanlon, Andrew Schlussel, Josh Qualtieri. Produced at Ex'pression College for Digital Arts. Copyright 2011 Brian Andrews.

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20113D animationanimated sequence • animated short • animated short film • animated teaser • atmospheric presence • bones • Brian Andrews • chase scenecreaturedangerous environments • Expression College for Digital Arts • flying creature • frog • Hominid (2012) • hominidae • hominids • human skeleton • human x-ray • humanoidmonochromatic • photo-composite • sepiaskeletonspiderteaser trailertranslucence • veterinary x-ray • visual style • winged creature • x-ray

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2016

Skins: Designing Games with First Nations Youth

"Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), based out of Obx Labs at Concordia University in Montreal and directed by Lewis and Skawennati Fragnito, is a network of academics, artists, and technologists that encourages Indigenous participation in online culture and exploration of new media technology. The main objective of the AbTeC research network is to discover, define, and implement methods by which Indigenous people can use networked communication technology to strengthen our cultures. In an effort to overcome the economic, social, and cultural factors that influence the low rate of Indigenous participation in the making of new media and encourage Indigenous representation in digital games and virtual worlds specifically, AbTeC proposed to conduct Skins, a game/virtual world development workshop for Aboriginal youth that teaches them design programming, art, animation, and audio. ...

In conducting Skins, our goal is to encourage First Nations youth to be more than consumers of digital media; rather, we wish to show them how they themselves can be creators who can approach games with a critical perspective and from within their own cultural context. We are motivated by the possibilities of digital games and virtual environments for Indigenous peoples as well as correcting or adding to representations of Indigenous peoples in commercial games. Indigenous peoples' survival, recovery, development, and self-determination hinges on the preservation and revitalization of languages, social and spiritual practices, social relations, and arts [1]. Digital games and virtual environments, with their unique combination of story, design, code, architecture, art, animation, and sound [2], provide a rich medium though which to explore different strategies for pursuing such preservation and revitalization. For example, Thornton Media's RezWorld is a virtual environment for learning the Cherokee language. It has even been argued that the fluid, open, and networked characteristics of modern digital media make it particularly useful as a tool for Aboriginal storytelling, with Loretta Todd, Cree/M├ętis filmmaker and Director of the Aboriginal Media Arts Lab, suggesting 'the experience of cyberspace offers the reversal of narrative as derived from storytelling, a return to oral tradition' [3]. Furthermore, due to the radical decrease in the costs of the means of production and distribution, digital games and virtual worlds present Indigenous people with a powerful opportunity to widely (or narrowly) communicate stories in which we shape our own representation."

(Beth Aileen Lameman and Jason Edward Lewis, 2011)

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2011Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal Media Arts Lab • Aboriginal storytelling • Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC) • Aboriginal youth • Bart Simon • Beth Aileen Lameman • CanadaCelia Pearce • Cherokee language • Christian Beauclair • community participatory project • Concordia University • Cree • cultural representations • development workshop • digital games • digital media and learning • Dogrib • First NationsFirst Nations youth • Haudenosaunee • Indigenous cultural production • Indigenous participation • Indigenous peopleindigenous peoples • Indigenous representation in digital games • Indigenous representation in virtual worlds • Iroquois • Jason Edward Lewis • Journal of Game Design and Development Education • Katherine Isbister • Ken Finney • language preservation • Loretta Todd • Louise Profeit • making new media • Metis • Mohawk • Montreal • more than consumers • Myron Lameman • Nacho Nyak Dun • Nehiraw • new media artist • new media technologiesNorth American • Obx Labs at Concordia University • oral traditionresearch network • revitalisation of languages • RezWorld • Richard Van Camp • self-determination • Skawennati Fragnito • spiritual practices • Steve Loft • Steve Sanderson • Thornton Media • traditional culturevideo game designvideo games and Indigenous peoplevirtual environmentsvirtual worlds

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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