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Which clippings match 'Cinematic Language' keyword pg.1 of 2
09 JUNE 2013

Lady in the Lake: the dramatic effect of subjective point of view

"Robert Montgomery drehte 'Lady in the Lake' 1947 nach einem Plot, das Raymond Chandlers gleichnamigen Roman adaptierte. In diesem Spielfilm verfolgen Beobachter die Handlung aus der Perspektive des Detektivs Philip Marlowe: Personen, die sich Marlowe zuwenden und mit ihm sprechen, wenden sich der Kamera zu. Das wirkt in Filmvorführungen im Kino, als wenden sie sich in den Projektionsraum und sprechen die Zuschauer an. Der Beobachter wird zugleich ins Bildgeschehen durch die szenische Konstellation hineingezogen (Immersion), wie auf die Grenze zwischen Filmraum und Projektionsraum verwiesen, da er im Filmraum nicht selbst handeln kann, sich aber wie Marlowe im Bildraum verortet. Marlowe bleibt ein anderer, meist unsichtbarer Körper, der aber sieht und den Anschluss des Beobachters an seine Wahrnehmung einfordert: Die Kamera verleiht ihren Beobachtern einen szenischen Kontext, in den Kinozuschauer sich versetzen können. Sie stossen dabei sowohl auf Vorgaben (wie Marlowe spricht) wie auf Fehlstellen (das Sichtbare von Marlowes Auftreten, wenn er nicht in einen Spiegel schaut)."

(Thomas Dreher, IASLonline)

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1947 • Audrey Totter • black and whitecamera anglecinematic conventionscinematic language • cinematic space • crime fictiondetective storyfilm languagefilm noirfirst-person point of viewformal conceit • hardboiled • hardboiled detective • IASLonline • immersionLady in the Lake (1947)perspective view • Philip Marlowe • point of viewPOV • Raymond Chandler • Robert Montgomery • screen space • subjective shot • subjective viewpoint • visual conceit • visual depictionvisual language

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

A Game with No Rules: rear projected Kiwi short film melodrama

"A trio of future Kiwi screen stars smoke, smoulder, steal – and worse – in Scott Reynolds' serpentine short noir. Kane (Marton Csokas) and his Zambesi–clad woman on the side (Danielle Cormack) set about ripping off Kane's rich wife (Jennifer Ward–Lealand) with bloody results. Writer/director Scott Reynolds and longtime partner in crime, cinematographer Simon Raby, serve notice of their talents – and inspirations – with heady lighting, deliberately shonky back projection, and opening titles right out of Hitchcock [Saul Bass inspired]. Muso Greg Johnson supplies the horns."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig.1 Scott Reynolds/Zee Films (1994), "A Game with No Rules" Aotearoa New Zealand, 35mm 16 minutes.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MARCH 2012

CINEMA ESSAY: SHALLOW FOCUS, DEEP FOCUS, TRACKING SHOT, ESTABLISHING SHOT

Majestic Micro Movies: Lloyd Fonvielle, James Lester, Kendra Elliot, Joe Griffin and Jae Song.

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a girl and a gunAndre Bazin • big depth of field • black and whitecameracinemacinematic conventionscinematic languagecinematic visual languagecinematographyclapperboardcoherent spacecompositioncontinuity editingdeep focusdepth of fielddepth of the screen spacedesign formalismDOF • establishing shot • figures in spacefilmfilm language • film take • film technique • filmlook • filmmaking • focus of attention • Manny Farber • master shot • medium is the messagemise-en-scenenarrative scenesproductionscenescreen spaceselective focusshallow depth of fieldshallow focus • shot countershot • shot reverse shottracking cameratracking shot • two shot • video essayvisual depictionvisual languagevisual literacyvisual style • wide lens

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2011

Len Lye: an innovative explorer of cameraless filmmaking

"Cameraless film refers to a method of producing moving image where the artist or filmmaker bypasses the photographic process and directly manipulates film stock (either additively or subtractively) with methods such as drawing, collage and painting. Due to the inherent difficulties of generating handmade images on film, direct animation doesn't lend itself to pictorial illusion or linear narratives. The imagery tends to be atavistic, animistic, frenetic; and due in part to this visual proximity to pure abstraction, the conceptual content of this genre has been largely overlooked. Since they sit so ambivalently between fine art and cinema, both camps have historically positioned these films as being principally concerned with formalism and material experimentation. But revising this apprehension, Zelluloid: Filme Ohne Kamera brings together a selection of films, tracing the ideational threads which significantly inform and influence this manner of filmmaking.

In 1935, Len Lye's film A Colour Box was so different in its use of filmic language that the Brussels Film Festival had to invent a new prize for it to win. As vivid and enchanting today as they were visionary and challenging, Lye's animated shapes dancing to the percussion of popular Cuban and African music were a hit with audiences more accustomed to viewing cinema in its industrial, commercial capacity. The very act of painting abstract imagery on film was a conceptual leap in terms of severing film's indexical relationship with the world and using it to explore an abstract, synaesthetic experience."

(Genevieve Allison, 5 August 2010, EyeContact)

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1935 • A Colour Box • abstraction • Aldo Tambellini • Amy GranatanimationAotearoa New Zealandart • Barbel Neubauer • Belgium • Brussels Film Festival • cameraless film • Cecile Fontaine • cinematic languagecolourcraftcreative practicedesign formalismDieter Rothdirect animationdirect filmdirect manipulationdrawing • Emmanuel Lefrant • experienceexperimental filmfilm making • film stock • filmmakerfine arthandmadeHarry Smith • Hy Hirsh • Ian Helliwell • imageryJennifer ReevesJennifer West • Jose Antonio Sistiaga • kiwi short filmsLen Lye • Luis Recoder • Marcelle Thirache • material experimentationmaterial practicematerialist cinemamethodmoving imageNew Zealand cultureNorman McLarenpaintingpattern • Pierre Rovere • pioneerpure abstraction • Schmelzdahin • scratch filmsequence designStan Brakhagesynaesthesia • Takahiko Iimura • Tony Conradvisual artsvisual culturevisual languagevisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2004

Buffalo 66: interior thoughts as simultaneous moments within single frames

Vincent Gallo's debut feature film Buffalo 66 (1998) fractures sequences of the film, presenting them as complex, multifaceted events. There is a sense that each of these sequences could be re–visited from a different angle causing a different reading. This approach breaks markedly with conventional Hollywood filmmaking language.

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1998auteurblack humour • Buffalo 66 (film) • Christina Ricci • cinematic languagedark comedyemotional misfitfilmfracture • interior thoughts • juxtapositionmisfitmultifacetedpicture-in-picturepsychological framingsequencesimultaneitysplit-screen • Vincent Gallo
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