Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'French' keyword pg.1 of 2
11 JULY 2014

The Adventure of English: the evolution of the English language

"The Adventure of English is a British television series (ITV) on the history of the English presented by Melvyn Bragg as well as a companion book, also written by Bragg. The series ran in 2003.

The series and the book are cast as an adventure story, or the biography of English as if it were a living being, covering the history of the language from its modest beginnings around 500 AD as a minor Germanic dialect to its rise as a truly established global language.

In the television series, Bragg explains the origins and spelling of many words based on the times in which they were introduced into the growing language that would eventually become modern English."

[Complete eight part series available on YouTube distributed by Maxwell's collection Pty Limited, Australia]

1

TAGS

2002 • A Dictionary of the English Language • American English • American Spelling Book • Anglo-SaxonArabicaristocracyAustraliaAustralian Aborigineauthoritative historyBible • Blue Backed Speller • British televisionCaribbean • Catherine of Aragon • Celtic language • Celts • Church of England • cockney rhyming slang • colonisationcommon languagecommunication • Convicts land • dialectdictionaryDutch • educated people • English languageEsperantoFrenchFrench languageFrisian • Frisian language • Gaelic • Germanic rootsgrammarGreek • Gullah language • Hebrew • Henry V of England • Henry VIII of England • historical eventshistoryhistory of ideas • History of the English language • history of useimmigrationIndiaindustrial revolutioninvasionIsaac NewtonITVJamaicanJane Austen • John Cheke • John WycliffeJonathan Swift • Joseph McCoy • Katherine Duncan-Jones • King James I • languagelanguage developmentLatin wordlinguisticsmedieval churchMelvyn Braggmini-series • modern English • Netherlands • Noah Webster • North America • Old English • peasant • Philip Sidne • pidgin • pronunciation • Queen Elizabeth I • Robert Burns • Rural Rides • Samuel JohnsonSanskritScotland • Scottish language • scripture • spelling • Squanto • television series • The Adventure of English (2002) • theologian • Thomas Sheridan • United Statesuse of wordsvikingvocabulary • Websters Dictionary • West Africa • William Cobbett • William Jones • William Shakespeare • William the Conqueror • William Tyndale • William Wordsworth • words

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2014

Bernard Pras: the perceptual organisation of found objects

"Bernard Pras is a French painter, photographer and sculptor. He has spent more than 20 years perfecting his craft. One of his more recent body of work feature sculptures of pop icons made entirely out of found objects which, when viewed from a specific angle, transforms into an easily recognizable image. His subjects include Albert Einstein,, Jack Nicholson, Bob Marley, Mao Zedong, Uncle Sam, and Che Guevarra. His inspirations include Salvador Dali, Edvard Munch, Japanese woodcut artist Hiroshige, and Guiseppe Arcimboldo."

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2013

How much of a language is silent? What does it look like when you take the silence out? Can we use code as a tool to answer these questions?

"silenc is a tangible visualization of an interpretation of silent letters within Danish, English and French.

One of the hardest parts about language learning is pronunciation; the less phonetic the alphabet, the harder it is to correctly say the words. A common peculiarity amongst many Western languages is the silent letter. A silent letter is a letter that appears in a particular word, but does not correspond to any sound in the word's pronunciation.

A selection of works by Hans Christian Andersen is used as a common denominator for these 'translations'. All silent letters are set in red text. When viewed with a red light filter, these letters disappear, leaving only the pronounced text.

silenc is based on the concept of the find–and–replace command. This function is applied to a body of text using a database of rules. The silenc database is constructed from hundreds of rules and exceptions composed from known guidelines for 'un'pronunciation. Processing code marks up the silent letters and GREP commands format the text.

silenc is visualized in different ways. In one form of a book, silent letters are marked up in red yet remain in their original position. In another iteration, silent letters are separated from the pronounced text and exhibited on their own pages in the back of the book, the prevalence of silent letters is clearly evident."

(Momo Miyazaki, Manas Karambelkar and Kenneth Aleksander Robertsen)

1
2

3

TAGS

2012alphabetbookCIIDCopenhagen Institute of Interaction Designcorrelative analogueDanishEnglish • exceptions • find-and-replace • FrenchGREP • GREP command • Hans Christian Andersen • Kenneth Aleksander Robertsen • language • learning language • legibility • Manas Karambelkar • Momo Miyazaki • phonetics • Processing (software)pronunciationredrules • Silenc (project) • silence • silent letter • sound correspondencetangible visualisationtexttranslation • visualisation interpretation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2012

Le Minitel Bye Bye on 30 June 2012

"Après 30 ans d'existence, le Minitel s'apprête à tirer sa révérence. Les plus jeunes ne verront même pas de quoi il est question, mais ceux qui étaient au collège ou au lycée dans les années 90 s'en rappelleront peut–être pour avoir recherché dessus leurs résultats aux examens du brevet ou du bac. Le Minitel, ou l'ancêtre d'internet ! Invention 100 % française, le 1er réseau dans l'histoire des télécommunications à permettre la 'connexion de terminaux permettant la visualisation de données informatiques' disparaîtra le 30 Juin 2012, et avec lui la machine à l'origine du fameux '36–15″. Définitivement la fin d'une époque.

After 30 years of existence, the Minitel is preparing to take its final bow. The youngest will not even see what it is about, but those who were in college or high school in the 90s will remember perhaps have looked over their test scores. The Minitel, or the ancestor of the Internet ! 100% French invention, the first network in the history of telecommunications to allow 'terminal connection to visualization of computer data' will draw his bow on June 30, 2012, and with it the machine behind the famous '36 – 15 '. Definitely the end of an era."

(Vincent Laserson, 31 May 2012, De Jeunes Gens Modernes)

1

TAGS

1980s19822012 • adult chatrooms • Apple Mac • beige plastic kitsch • chat roomcommunicationscybersex • De Jeunes Gens Modernes • design classic • deviceend of an eraFranceFrench • French invention • important technologiesinformation ageinformation technologyInternetle Minitel • Little French Box • Macintosh computerMinitel • Minitel Rose • network informationobsolescenceobsolete technologyprecursor technologyproduct designredundant technologysocial networkingSteve Jobstechnological innovationtelecommunicationstelephoneterminal connectiontransitional technologies • Ulla • user-friendly • world wide web • yellow pages

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MARCH 2012

Jean Cocteau: la Belle et la Bête

"La lumière brillante et surnaturelle qui avait dominé toute la scène du château (flamme des chandeliers, feu, reflets étincelants de l'argenterie) s'estompe pour laisser la place à la lumière naturelle du jour [plan 9] [9]. Ces rayons lumineux rappellent ceux des dernières gravures de la Belle au vois dormant. D'autant plus que cette lumière naturelle n'est pas légitimée par la présence d'une fenêtre, comme c'est le cas chez Doré. C'est une lumière naturelle, la lumière du jour, mais elle semble toujours éclairer le personnage de manière surnaturelle : comment la lumière extérieure peut–elle pénétrer à l'intérieur sans la présence d'aucune fenêtre ? Les flambeaux s'éteignent un à un, le personnage traverse un grand pan de lumière blanche, la porte se referme toute seule, l'escalier apparaît en plongée : la scène semble se rejouer à l'envers, ce qui souligne la structure circulaire et la clôture de la séquence, mais aussi l'influence de l'œuvre de Gustave Doré. Le dialogue des contes et des illustrations se poursuit jusqu'à la dernière image de la séquence puisqu'elle se termine sur les ronces qui envahissent l'escalier du château de la Bête, comme celles qui envahissent les gravures du château de la Belle au bois dormant."

(Estelle Plaisant Soler, 26 juin 2006)

Fig.1 Jean Cocteau (1946). "la Belle et la Bête"

2). PDF of 100 Cult Films (Screen Guides).

1

TAGS

1946atmosphericbeastbeauty • candlebra • candlestick • caryatids • castlechandelierscostume design • daylight • eerie • enchanted garden • engraving • external light • externalisation • extinguished • fairy talefantasyfilmfilm designfireflameFrenchgloveGustave Dorehorse • iconogaphy • in the mindinterior spaceJean CocteauJean Marais • Josette Day • Jungian • key • La Belle et la Bete • light • living arms • Madame Leprince de Beaumont • magic • merchant • metaphormotion picturemyth • natural light • Prince Charmingrealityset design • silverware • Sleeping Beauty • smoke-breathing • sparkling reflections • spatial symbolismspecial effectsstaircasestory • supernatural • surrealismsymbolismtalismantheatrical space • torch • visual designvisual metaphorvisual spectacle • white light

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.