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Which clippings match 'Artisan' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 DECEMBER 2013

Design genius or author as editor: filtering and synthesising?

"In 'What is an author?' [4], Michel Foucault says we are 'accustomed to presenting the author as a genius.' We see the author as the 'genial creator' of work in which he gives us, 'with infinite wealth and generosity,' an inexhaustible world of meanings. (Being 'creative' always has a positive ring, whatever is produced!) Foucault says that the author does not 'precede' the work: ideas and meanings are already there and the author's role is to 'choose,' to filter and synthesise to create output. (Foucault also emphasises 'limiting' and 'excluding'). The author's role is to limit the proliferation of meanings and present a personal view of the world. Yet the 'genius author' is represented as a continual source of invention–the opposite of his genuine function."

(Monika Parrinder, 2000, Eye Magazine)


April Greiman • art and designart market • art star • artisanartist • artist myth • artistic solutions • Atelier Populaire • auteur theoryauthor as editorauthor as geniusavant-garde artists • being creative • blur boundaries • bohemian • Brigit Fowler • Bruce Mau • canonisation • celebritycliche • constructed idea • creative geniuscreative individuals • creative intuition • cult of the author • cult of the individual • cultural elite • Cunst Art • cutting-edge innovationsDavid Carsondesign community • Design Quarterly • design star • designer as author • editing through selectionEuropean EnlightenmentEye (magazine)fine art • Fran Cottell • genial creatorgenius • genius author • genius creator • genius mythgenius of the individual • genius status • graphic authorship • graphic design • Griselda Pollock • Hard Werken • history of ideas • ID Magazine • ingenue • innate talent • inspired visionaries • intuitioninventionJohn Maeda • John Walker • legitimate discipline • liberal artslone genius • lone pioneer • madman • maverick graphic designer • Michael Howe • Michael RockMichel Foucaultmodernismmyth of the geniusNeville Brodynon-conformist • ordinary mortal • Paul RandPentagram Designpersonapersonal expressionpersonal visionpersonalityPeter SavillePierre Bourdieupioneerromantic notion of the artist • Rozsika Parker • self-aggrandisement • self-taught • semi-divine status • solitary • spiritual insight • status • talenttaste (sociology) • Terry Jones • Tomato (design agency)tortured soul • ubermeister • visionary


Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2011

New Directions in Interdisciplinarity: Broad, Deep, and Critical

"Before interdisciplinarity in either the disciplinary producing or disciplinary–circumscribing senses could manifest itself, disciplinarity itself had to take on its peculiarly modern form. Any assessment of interdisciplinarity – multi – and trans–, noncritical and critical– will benefit from an appreciation of this background.

Prior to the modern period, learning exhibited a kind of unity that might be called predisciplinary. Aristotle, it is true, introduced distinctions between logic, physics, and ethics, but these were never of a kind to raise the possibility of cross–disciplinary formations such as 'physical ethics.' During the Middle Ages, the division of the artes liberales into grammar, rhetoric, dialectic (the trivium), arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music (the quadrivium) ensured that the education of 'free men' included all the knowledge and skills needed to exercise their social roles. Insofar as it existed, disciplinary specialization was present more in the 'servile arts' of artisans and tradesmen. Not even teachers of the liberal arts became specialists in their different branches, because the idea of, for example, possessing arithmetic without grammar would have been considered a deformation of the mind. In the monastery schools, the unfettered pursuit of knowledge was viewed skeptically, criticized as curiositas, and therefore subject to disciplinization in a premodern behavioral sense. Only at the end of the Middle Ages, as the infinite pursuit of disciplinary knowledge took on the character of a spiritual activity, would Renaissance men become necessary to cross boundaries and synthesize diverse areas of learning."

(Robert Frodeman and Carl Mitcham, 2007, p.508)

[1][2] Frodeman, R. and C. Mitcham (2007). "New Directions in Interdisciplinarity: Broad, Deep, and Critical." Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society 27(6).


Aristotlearithmetic • artes liberales • artisanastronomy • cross boundaries • cross-disciplinary • curiositas • dialecticdisciplinary knowledgedisciplinary specialisationdisciplinesdiscursive fielddivisionethicsEuropean Renaissance • free men • geometrygrammarinterdisciplinarityknowledgeknowledge integrationlearningliberal artslogicmiddle agesModern • modern period • monastery schools • multidisciplinaritymusicorderingphysics • predisciplinary • premodernpursuit of knowledgeQuadriviumrhetoricservile artsskillsocial construction of knowledgesocial rolesspecialisation • spiritual activity • synthesis • tradesmen • transdisciplinarityTrivium • unity


Simon Perkins

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