Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Visual Culture' keyword pg.1 of 3
02 AUGUST 2013

Image [&] Narrative: peer-reviewed e-journal on visual narratology and word and image studies

"Image [&] Narrative is a peer–reviewed e–journal on visual narratology and word and image studies in the broadest sense of the term. It does not focus on a narrowly defined corpus or theoretical framework, but questions the mutual shaping of literary and visual cultures. Beside tackling theoretical issues, it is a platform for reviews of real life examples. Each issue features three parts: 1) a thematic cluster, guest–edited by specialized scholars in the field; 2) a selection of various articles; 3) reviews of recent publications. Image [&] Narrative is a bilingual journal, which publishes contributions in either English or French, and which fosters cross–cultural and interdisciplinary dialogue between linguistic and scientific traditions."

TAGS

academic journal • bilingual journal • cross-cultural dialogue • e-journalEnglish languageFrench language • image and narrative • Image and Narrative (journal) • interdisciplinary dialogue • linguistic traditions • literary and visual cultures • literary cultures • literary studiesnarratologyOnline Magazine of the Visual Narrative • Open Humanities Press (OHP) • Open Journal Systems (OJS)peer-reviewed journal • Public Knowledge Project (PKP) • publication review • recent publications • scientific tradition • thematic cluster • visual culture • visual narratology • word and image • word and image studies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 JULY 2013

Was Ways of Seeing the first pre-digital book?

"Everyone is talking about the way in which digital media is destabilizing print. I thought it was interesting to choose the reverse scenario: something that started digital but found its real audience in print. Ways of Seeing started as a four–part television series on the BBC in England conceived of and written by art critic John Berger. Berger was reacting specifically to the traditional connoisseurship of Kenneth Clark in the Civilisation series, another famous television program, which inscribed the canonical march of Western culture in heroic terms. As a critique of Clark, Berger created a popular reading of the icons of western art not as aesthetic objects, but deeply cultural artifacts that reveal, upon close 'reading', the limitation, prejudice, bias, and obsession of the culture from which they sprang.

This form of cultural criticism was established in the Universities, especially Marxist leaning polytechnics, but had never before had such a popular airing. The idea that classic paintings could be decoded to reveal social facts–and in fact Berger compared them to modern advertising–was heretical and his work was met with incredulity and anger in the hallowed halls of University Art History departments around the country, But Berger's position, especially his proto–feminist critique of female nudes, would grow to become the dominant form of art criticism in the years ahead.

The television program had moderate success but shortly after it aired Berger joined with producer Mike Dibb and graphic designer Richard Hollis to produce a printed version of the televised series. Clark had also produced a book to accompany Civilisation: a huge, lavish, full–color coffee table monster that must have weighted 10 kilos. In contrast Berger, Dibb and Hollis produced a slim paperback, 127 x 203mm, of only 166 pages. Even more radical, the book was produced in black + white, reducing the famous art to mere notations on standard, uncoated paper of a trade book. It was published by the BBC Books under the Pelican Books imprint, a division of the venerable Penguin Press organized to publish books to educate rather than entertain the reading public.

Even more striking was the book's design. Hollis starts the text of the first essay on the cover: 'Seeing comes before words. The child looks and recognizes before it can speak.' This simple typographic trick gives the book both a certain modesty (saves on pages) and an urgency (no time to waste). Starting on the outside also suggests a digital quality, the content is broadcast to the reader even as they pass the shelf.

The interior is equally unusual. Hollis set the entire book in a bold sans serif font, a very unlikely choice and aggressively un–civilized. There is no nod to classicism, the book is an entirely modern form. The text is broken down into short bursts, usually no more than a paragraph coupled with a visual example. Again reflecting its origin as a televisual experience the text and images work simultaneously, one form leveraging the other. There are five such text–and–image essays on everything from renaissance nudes to modern advertising. But Berger also adds for entirely visual essays. He assembles a series of examples that by the power of his selection and through their aggressive juxtaposition, he makes his thesis without any words at all. In so doing he presages the development of the curated playlist as a predominant contemporary form and creates the first pre–digital book."

(Michael Rock, 2011, 2x4)

1

TAGS

2011 • 2x4 • aesthetic objectsart criticismart history • BBC Books • BBC Twoblack and white • canonical march • Civilisation (series) • contemporary form • cultural artefacts • cultural criticism • curated playlist • destabilising force • digital media • digital quality • educate rather than entertain • end of print • famous art • female nudes • heroic terms • John Bergerjuxtaposition • Kenneth Clark • Michael Rock • Mike Dibb • modern advertising • modern form • modestypaperback • Pelican Books • Penguin Random Housepolytechnic • pre-digital book • print and digitalprinted version • proto-feminist critique • renaissance nudes • Richard Hollis • sans-serif typeface • seeing comes before words • short formsocial factstelevision programmetelevision seriestelevisual experiencetext and image • trade book • typographic trick • uncoated paper • urgency • visual culturevisual essayWays of Seeingwestern artWestern culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JULY 2013

Is Photoshop Remixing the World?

"Photoshop has completely revolutionized our visual culture. Artists now use Photoshop to create complex imagery that would have been impossible 20 years ago. It has also profoundly changed the art of photo retouching, turning a labor intensive process into an artful and often controversial digital workflow. But possibly the most current and expressive influence can be seen in meme culture online. With the ability to alter any image in the media landscape, everyday people now have the means to critically comment on culture and spread their ideas virally, leveling the playing field between traditional media creators and consumers. Photoshop has changed the way we communicate, the way we express ourselves, and the way we view the world and each other."

1
2

TAGS

altering images • amateur cultural productionbaroquebeauty industry • Chris Buck • complex imagery • compositingcreative practice • critically comment • digital workflow • Don Caldwell • everyday people • expressive influence • Jeff Huang • labour intensive • Laurent Le Moing • Matt Jones • Matthias Vriens • media consumermedia landscapememe culturememesOff Book • online discourse • PBS • pepper spraying cop • photo manipulationphoto retouchingPhotoshop • photoshop disasters • photoshopped • photoshopping • producers and consumersquestioning traditionsremix culture • Robert Maxwell • thumbs and ammo • traditional media creator • Txema Yeste • visual communicationvisual culturevisual effectsworkflowworkflow tool

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JUNE 2013

The Visual Telling of Stories: a collection of advertising images, magazine spreads and book illustrations

"The website of The Visual Telling of Stories aspires to being a Visual Lexicon, dedicated to the primacy of the Visual Proposition. Above all it tries to create an overall consistency of structure and environment, as if it was all taking place in one characteristic landscape through which you are allowed to wander. The main delight and challenge is the invention of non–linear means of navigation through spaces of knowledge with a created balance of reference and discovery."

(Chris Mullen)

Fig.1 Emile Allais, Roger Frison–Roche, et al. (1947). How to Ski by the French Method: Emile Allais, Technic. Preface by Frison–Roche. Photos and Layout by Pierre Boucher. Translated from the French by Agustin R. Edwards, Éditions Flèche [http://www.fulltable.com/vts/aoi/b/boucher/bc.htm].

1

2

TAGS

advertising imagesadvertising posters • Agustin Edwards • American dreambook designbook illustration • Chris Mullen • collected examples • cultural codescultural narrativesdesign and visual culture • Emile Allais • ephemeragraphic representationimage collectionlogocentricmagazine layoutmaterial culturemiscellaneousnewspaperspersonal cataloguepersonal collections • pictures tell stories • propaganda • Roger Frison-Roche • vintage advertisingvisual codesvisual communicationvisual culturevisual ephemera • visual lexicon • visual taxonomy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2013

When Is Now? The Historical Present in Creative Practice

Thursday 27th June 2013, 10:00am – 4:30pm, Waterside 2, The Watershed, Bristol, UK.

"This one–day symposium explores the historical present in creative practice. In a cultural climate that valorizes the 'now' what does it mean to occupy the present moment? Our aim is to examine the present tense of creative practice as itself historical as opposed to understanding it as the end point of a linear chronological line. The symposium is motivated by a desire to pay attention to the atmospheric 'thickness' of the present tense in art, media and design practices and to imagine what kinds of experience can be articulated when what Lauren Berlant calls the 'ongoingness' of life is slowed down and brought into visibility. The symposium includes papers on the historical present in relation to painting, sound, photography, film, digital media and video."

TAGS

2013 • Betty Nigianni • Caroline Molley • chronological line • chronological sequencecontemporary presentcreative practice • Deborah Withers • design practicedigital media • Dot Rowe • film • Frank Bowling • historical present • historical understanding • inventing history • Jerry Walton • Katie Davies • Lauren Berlantlinear • linear timeline • media practicemomentmoments • moving sound • now • ongoingnesspainting • Peter Wright • photography • present moment • present tense • repetition • Rose Butler • School of Arts (UWE) • simultaneitysnapshotsoundstill imagesymposium • thickness • Tony Oursler • UKUniversity of the West of England • UWE • videovisual culture • Visual Culture Research Group (UWE)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.