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Which clippings match 'Information Collection' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 AUGUST 2013

Controversial Aotearoa New Zealand surveillance laws pass

"The controversial spy laws have been passed by Parliament by 61 votes to 59. The laws were drafted in the wake of a succession of blunders by New Zealand's foreign intelligence agency, the Government Communications Security Bureau, which included illegally spying on German internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom. Earlier, Prime Minister John Key acknowledged new surveillance laws have 'alarmed' some people but blames the Government's opponents for stoking their fears. Legislation giving the GCSB the power to spy on New Zealanders was debated in Parliament today ahead of being passed into law."

(Tracy Watkins, 21 August 2013, Fairfax NZ News)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2010

The problem of conflating symbolic and logical concepts with real world material objects

"the portrayal of WikiLeaks as a website might have been a brilliant piece of misdirection. People in general don't tend to grasp information theory, but it's sometimes particularly easy to laugh at just how little understanding some sections of the establishment appear to have:

'The Defense Department demands that WikiLeaks return immediately to the U.S. government all versions of documents obtained directly or indirectly from the Department of Defense databases or records' (Kevin Poulsen, 5 August 2010, 8:44 pm)

There are, I think, two important things about WikiLeaks. The first is the use of technology – of the internet and cryptography – to facilitate the collection of information from anonymous sources. The second is the fact that information is available in a digitised form. This latter property means that leaking a gigabit of information is hardly more difficult than leaking a single bit. If someone has the information and the motivation to leak something, it will be leaked. All that WikiLeaks does is to solicit this information actively. It's a brand, and an organisation, and a network, but it's not really a website."

(Paul Battley, 05 December 2010)

[This a problem caused by conflating symbolic and logical concepts with real world material objects. In this case the use of the metaphor of 'the web' conflates the symbolic structure of a spider's web with the structural logic of an information network. In doing so the metaphor makes concrete that which it is not i.e. it is an intangible and dynamic coded system of information flows which is in a constant state of transformation.]

Poulsen, K. (2010, 5 August, 8:44 pm). "Pentagon Demands WikiLeaks 'Return' All Classified Documents." Wired.com August 2010. from http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/08/pentagon–demands–wikileaks/.

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TAGS

2010 • conflating logical concepts with real world material objects • conflating symbolic concepts with real world material objects • conspiracy • cryptographydata security • database records • defence department • defense • digital culturedigitisation • Geoff Morrell • Governmentimmaterialityimposing resemblancesinformation collectioninformation sharinginformation theoryintangibilityInternet • leak • leaking classified information • limits of languagelogical fallacy • misdirection • networkontological worldview • Paul Battley • press secretary • public disclosure • real world material objects • real world objectsreal world visual metaphorreliance on representational thinkingrepresentational thinkingrepresentational thinking expressed in analogiesrepresentational thinking expressed in metaphors • US Pentagon • website • whack-a-mole • Wikileaks

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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