Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Found Object' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 JUNE 2014

Bernard Pras: the perceptual organisation of found objects

"Bernard Pras is a French painter, photographer and sculptor. He has spent more than 20 years perfecting his craft. One of his more recent body of work feature sculptures of pop icons made entirely out of found objects which, when viewed from a specific angle, transforms into an easily recognizable image. His subjects include Albert Einstein,, Jack Nicholson, Bob Marley, Mao Zedong, Uncle Sam, and Che Guevarra. His inspirations include Salvador Dali, Edvard Munch, Japanese woodcut artist Hiroshige, and Guiseppe Arcimboldo."

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 NOVEMBER 2012

CollageMachine: An Interactive Agent of Web Recombination

"CollageMachine builds interactive collages from the Web. First you choose a direction. Then CollageMachine will take you surfing out across the Internet as far as it can reach. It builds a collage from the most interesting media it can find for you. You don't have to click through links. You rearrange the collage to refine your exploration.

CollageMachine is an agent of recombination. Aesthetics of musical composition and conceptual detournement underlie its development. The composer John Cage and Dada artists such as Marcel Duchamp and Max Ernst used structured chance procedures to create aesthetic assemblages. These works create new meaning by recontextualizing found objects. Instead of functioning as a single visual work, CollageMachine embodies the process of collage making.

CollageMachine [1] deconstructs Web sites and re-presents them in collage form. The program crawls the Web, downloading sites. It breaks each page down into media elements—images and texts. Over time, these elements stream into a collage. Point, click, drag, and drop to rearrange the media. How you organize the

elements shows CollageMachine what you're interested in. You can teach it to bring media of interest to you. On the basis of your interactions, CollageMachine reasons about your interests; the evolving model informs ongoing choices of selection and placement. CollageMachine has been developed through a process of freely combining disciplines according to the principles of 'interface ecology.'"

1

TAGS

1996 • aesthetic assemblages • agent of recombination • Andruid Kerne • collagecollage art • collage form • collage making • CollageMachine (1996) • conceptual collage • conceptual detournement • create new meaning • detournement • digital collage • evolving model • foundfound object • freely combining • influential works • interactive collage • interface ecology • Internet artInternet artworkJohn CageMarcel DuchampMax Ernst • musical composition • net artnew media • New York Digital Salon • objet trouverecombinationrecombinatory practicerecontextualisationrecontextualising found objects • selection and placement • structured chance procedures • web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2005

The Gleaners and I: making art from rubbish

"'The Gleaners and I' is a decidedly personal video documentary by Varda, a film ostensibly preoccupied with 'rubbish'. Varda takes us on a journey where we encounter those who live from other peoples' – from people who eat out of dumpsters and 'glean' provincial fields after harvest, to those who make art from tossed away furniture and beyond. It's a brilliant and playful film and one which Julie Rigg decared she was 'in love with' when she interviewed Agnes Varda.

JULIE RIGG: Agnes Varda, I'm curious about this film. Did it begin as a film about yourself or a film about gleaners?

AGNES VARDA: It's clearly about gleaners, it's clearly not only the intention because who cares about an intention, what is important is the film you see. And not only that, it's a very important subject, a social issue, which is, 'who are those people who eat the leftovers, the leftovers of others?' Who is eating my leftovers, you know? And that was really concerning me, like it does to other people, and I thought instead of having a subject, a subject line and say could we find people to illustrate it? I totally had another attitude and thought how can I meet people who are the subject? So I don't have to explain and make any narration about that, find the right people who will be able to show themselves by their life. [With this film] I was saying 'why will those people live and eat what we throw away, and can I meet them, can I speak to them?' And they are able to say when and what and how."
(Julie Rigg, ABC Australia)

Fig.1 Agnès Varda, 2000. Les Glaneurs et La Glaneuse
Fig.2 Jean François Millet, 1857. Musée d'Orsay

1
2

TAGS

18572000 • Agnes Varda • agricultural producebio-ethicscollectionconsumptioncultural constructiondocumentary filmfilmfoodfoundfound objectFrenchgleanergleaninggrain production • Jean Francois Millet • land usepeasantpersonal filmrubbishsustainabilitytraditionvegetableswastewomen in film
03 JANUARY 2004

Rauschenberg: Design by Improvisation

"Much critical commentary on Rauschenberg has focused on the so–called combine paintings of the late 1950s and early 1960s. These were the works––most notably, the horizontally disposed painting Monogram, sporting a stuffed Angora goat, and the vertically disposed painting Bed, incorporating a real quilt and pillow––that briefly earned Rauschenberg a reputation as something of an enfant terrible and as one of the leading exponents of a new post–Duchampian avant–garde. He was singled out in this way, along with Cage and Marcel Duchamp and the unlikely Jean Tinguely, in a widely read book by Calvin Tomkins published in 1968 under the title Ahead of the Game: Four Versions of the Avant–Garde. (6) Rauschenberg's more materially encumbered combine paintings came to be seen as effecting a radical restructuring of painting, with the work no longer functioning as formalized entity set in the viewer's line of sight to evoke a fictional pictorial space but rather as something much more literal and insistently materialized, a flat support to which objects, images, and paint were attached."
(Alex Potts)

Alex Potts, Reviewed work(s): Random Order: Robert Rauschenberg and the Neo–Avant–Garde by Branden Joseph, The Art Bulletin, Vol. 87, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 167–170 (review consists of 4 pages), Published by: College Art Association.

1

TAGS

1959ad-hoc • aleatoricism • angora goat • avant-gardecanvas • combine paintings • foundfound objectgoatimprovised methodjunk art • Monogram • objet trouvepaintingreadymadeRobert Rauschenberg • tyre
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.