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Which clippings match 'Subtlety' keyword pg.1 of 2
09 AUGUST 2012

Chris Saunders: One to One Hundred Project

"With this project I intend to concentrate purely on taking close up photographs of faces of people from my hometown of Sheffield. I will photograph 100 people, one person for every year of age, each of whom will be asked to provide the clearest photograph they can find taken when they were younger. This picture, along with the photograph I take, will be placed together to form the final version of each piece showing how the subject's face has changed over the intervening years."

(Chris Saunders)

Fig.1 Chris Saunders (2012) "Danny aged 3 and 54", One to One Hundred Project.

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2012change observer • changes over time • Chris Saunders • close up photographs • close-up • Danny Kaye • face • faces • faces of peoplefacial nuancehometown • One to One Hundred Project • photographerphotographic portrait • portrait photographer • portraitureSheffieldsubtletyUK • youth and age

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2012

The Intimate Photograph: what does intimacy mean in visual terms?

"The goal of this class is to articulate and explore what intimacy means in visual terms. We will try and assemble a rhetorical rather than a purely emotional guide to the photograph's intimate claims. In the end, we may come to the conclusion that intimacy cannot be photographed directly (as we experience it) because, quite simply, the camera is always in the way. The trick, perhaps, is to understand intimacy as an imaginary space –– an illusion that exploits our very real longing for a profound and authentic encounter with another."

(Doug Dubois, 2010)

Fig.1 Doug Dubois (2003). "My Mother's Scar", Gloucester, Massachusetts.

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Berlin • digitalfotografie • dokumentarfotografie • Doug Dubois • facial nuanceforensic detail • foto • fotografie • fotokurs • fotokurse • intimacyintimate imageobservationphotographic portrait • photographic visual language • photographie • photographyportraitportraiturereal-lifeseeingsubtletyvisual languagewatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 NOVEMBER 2011

Buster Keaton: one of the greatest comic actors of all time

"Buster Keaton is considered one of the greatest comic actors of all time. His influence on physical comedy is rivaled only by Charlie Chaplin. Like many of the great actors of the silent era, Keaton's work was cast into near obscurity for many years. Only toward the end of his life was there a renewed interest in his films. An acrobatically skillful and psychologically insightful actor, Keaton made dozens of short films and fourteen major silent features, attesting to one of the most talented and innovative artists of his time. ...

Often at odds with the physical world, his ability to naively adapt brought a melancholy sweetness to the films. The subtlety of the work, however, left Keaton behind the more popular Chaplin and Lloyd. By the 1930s, the studio felt it was in their best interest to take control of his films. No longer writing or directing, Keaton continued to work at a grueling pace. Not understanding the complexity of his genius, they wrote for him simple characters that only took advantage of the most basic of his skills. For Keaton, as for many of the silent movie stars, the final straw was the advent of the talkies."

(American Masters and The Public Broadcasting Corporation)

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actor • actor-director • American MastersBuster KeatonCharlie Chaplincomedy • comic actor • daredevildeadpan expressionfilmmakerfunnyhumour • Joseph Frank Keaton • moviespathosPBSperformancephysical comedysilent filmsilent moviesslapstickstoicsubtlety • The Cameraman (film) • The General (film) • The Navigator (film)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2011

Laban Movement Analysis: qualitative aspects of nonverbal behaviour

"Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) originated in the work of Rudolf Laban, and has evolved into a highly detailed practical system that describes qualitative aspects of nonverbal behavior. In its current development, it operates as a phenomenology of movement and mind, as it requires that the observer look at the movement itself, prior to interpretation and without prejudice, while acknowledging the intrinsic connection between movement and subjective experience. Movement Analysis increases kinesthetic sensitivity for the observer, because it places in the foreground of the observer's experience, those aspects of movement which are individual–specific: that is, those movement choices which an individual makes within a particular context. Movement Analysis as a system of observation assumes that a significant degree of individual freedom in movement quality is always present within biological, cultural, and contextually defined bodily repertoires."

(Janet Kaylo)

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attunementbodies in spacebodily engagement • bodily repertoires • body experiencechoreographycorporealdance performance • dance therapy • everyday movementexpressive repertoirefigures in spaceforensic detail • freedom of movement • intimacyintimateintimate movement • kinaesthetic sensitivity • kinesthetic • kinesthetic participation • kinetic exchange • Laban Movement Analysis • language for describing movement • LMA • movementmovement analysis • movement analysis methodology • movement and subjective experience • movement efficiency • movement experience • movement life • movement lives • movement performance • movement quality • movement vocabulary • nonverbal behaviourobservationpatterns of movement • phenomenology of mind • phenomenology of movement • physical presenceposturepuppetryreal-life • Rudolf Laban • seeing • seeing another • sensitivity to others • sensory abilitysubtlety • system of observation • theatre performance • therapeutic • understanding movementwatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Elisza Ribeiro
27 APRIL 2011

Far better than 3-D: animated GIFs that savour a passing moment

"You know how people sometimes say that jazz is the only truly American art form? Animated GIFs are like the jazz of the internet: they could only exist, and be created and appreciated, online. That said, PopTart Cat is not exactly on par with Thelonious Monk. But photographer Jamie Beck and motion graphics artist Kevin Burg may have finally found a way to elevate the animated GIF to a level approaching fine art, with their 'cinemagraphs' –– elegant, subtly animated creations that are 'something more than a photo but less than a video.' ...

The pair was inspired to create these cinemagraphs while preparing to cover Fashion Week this past February: 'We wanted to tell more of a story than a single still frame photograph but didn't want the high maintenance aspect of a video,' they told Co.Design via email."

(John Pavlus, Co.Design)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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