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Which clippings match 'Buster Keaton' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 OCTOBER 2017

Heinrich Wölfflin's planimetric composition in films

"The 1960s saw the development of an opposite approach, what we might call the telephoto aesthetic. Improvements in long focal-length lenses, encouraged by the growing use of location shooting, led to a very different sort of imagery. Instead of exaggerating the distances between foreground and background, long lenses tend to reduce them, making figures quite far apart seem close in size. (In shooting a baseball game for television, the telephoto lens positioned behind the catcher presents catcher, batter, and pitcher as oddly close to one another.) Planes seem to be stacked or pushed together in a way that seems to make the space 'flatter,' the objects and figures more like cardboard cutouts."

(David Bordwell, 2005)

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TAGS

Buster Keaton • cardboardy space • cinematographyDavid Bordwellflat picture planeflat space • flatter-looking space • frame stacking • Heinrich Wolfflin • imageryJean-Luc Godard • less voluminous • long lenses • Michelangelo Antonioni • planar composition • planimetric composition • rectangular geometry • stacking • telephoto shot • wide-angle lenses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JULY 2013

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

"Inspired in equal measures, by Hurricane Katrina, Buster Keaton, The Wizard of Oz, and a love for books, 'Morris Lessmore' is a story of people who devote their lives to books and books who return the favor. The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore is a poignant, humorous allegory about the curative powers of story. Using a variety of techniques (miniatures, computer animation, 2D animation), award–winning author/illustrator William Joyce and Co–director Brandon Oldenburg present a hybrid style of animation that harkens back to silent films and M–G–M Technicolor musicals. 'Morris Lessmore' is old–fashioned and cutting edge at the same time."

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2011animated short film • blown away • books • Brandon Oldenburg • Buster Keatoncomputer animationcontemplating mortality • cyclone • flip bookflip effectflying • hurricane • Hurricane Katrina • hybrid process • hybrid style • life and death • love of books • MGM • Moonbot Studios • Morris Lessmore • mortality • new beginnings • nostalgic yearningpianoromanticismTechnicolor • The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore • The Wizard of Oz • tornado • typhoon • William Joyce • windstorm

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 NOVEMBER 2011

Buster Keaton: one of the greatest comic actors of all time

"Buster Keaton is considered one of the greatest comic actors of all time. His influence on physical comedy is rivaled only by Charlie Chaplin. Like many of the great actors of the silent era, Keaton's work was cast into near obscurity for many years. Only toward the end of his life was there a renewed interest in his films. An acrobatically skillful and psychologically insightful actor, Keaton made dozens of short films and fourteen major silent features, attesting to one of the most talented and innovative artists of his time. ...

Often at odds with the physical world, his ability to naively adapt brought a melancholy sweetness to the films. The subtlety of the work, however, left Keaton behind the more popular Chaplin and Lloyd. By the 1930s, the studio felt it was in their best interest to take control of his films. No longer writing or directing, Keaton continued to work at a grueling pace. Not understanding the complexity of his genius, they wrote for him simple characters that only took advantage of the most basic of his skills. For Keaton, as for many of the silent movie stars, the final straw was the advent of the talkies."

(American Masters and The Public Broadcasting Corporation)

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actor • actor-director • American MastersBuster KeatonCharlie Chaplincomedy • comic actor • daredevildeadpan expressionfilmmakerfunnyhumour • Joseph Frank Keaton • moviespathosPBSperformancephysical comedysilent filmsilent moviesslapstickstoicsubtlety • The Cameraman (film) • The General (film) • The Navigator (film)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2010

Charlie Chaplin: truth and naturalism through improvisation

"While Harold Lloyd played the daredevil, hanging from clocks, and Buster Keaton maneuvered through surreal and complex situations, [Charlie] Chaplin concerned himself with improvisation. For Chaplin, the best way to locate the humor or pathos of a situation was to create an environment and walk around it until something natural happened. The concern of early theater and film was to simply keep the audience's attention through overdramatic acting that exaggerated emotions, but Chaplin saw in film an opportunity to control the environment enough to allow subtlety to come through."

(Public Broadcasting Service, 28th August 2006)

TAGS

actorAmerican MastersaudienceauthorshipBuster KeatonCharlie Chaplincomedycontroldaredevil • exaggerated emotions • filmfilm acting • Harold Lloyd • hidden treasures • humourimprovisationnaturalismpathosPBSperformancephysical comedy • Public Broadcasting Service • realismsilent moviessocial realitysubtletytheatretruth • Unknown Chaplin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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