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Which clippings match 'Online Courses' keyword pg.1 of 2
02 JANUARY 2014

Do teaching models in higher education need reinventing?

"Michael Barber, chief education adviser of the world's largest education firm, Pearson, has been reported saying middle–ranking UK universities could face extinction within the next 10 years if they don't find a way to 'mark themselves out of the crowd'. He said the traditional lecture model is outdated and remarked it was pointless for 100 universities to develop the same courses when 'the best professors are making their course available for free'.

If it's not just universities that face extinction, but university lectures too, is it time to rethink the way academics teach in universities? How do lecturers now see their role in higher education? And what do they think is the teaching model of the future?"

(Claire Shaw, 12 March 2013, Guardian Professional)

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TAGS

2013academic professionals • academic profile • Andrew Bollington • CourseraedX • flipped academics • flipped classroomsflipping the classroomfuture of education • FutureLearn • Guardian Professional • HElearning and teachinglecture formatlecture/laboratory format • Michael Barber • MOOCsonline coursesonline learningPearson • sustainable models • teaching methodsteaching practicesteaching resource • traditional lecture model • traditional methods • traditional practices • traditional teaching methods • UdacityUK universitiesuniversity teaching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 DECEMBER 2013

Interaction Design Education Summit 2014

Wednesday, 5 February 2014, Utrecht School of the Arts (HKU) at Hilversum (http://interaction14.ixda.org/venues/).

"At a moment in time where everybody and everything is constantly interacting – through the use of networks, apps, products, media and services – educating students to design these interactions is not only needed, but also a fundamental challenge. Rapid developments in society and technology put increasingly high demands on the knowledge and skills of future interaction designers. Challenging traditional institutions, some companies have started programs for in–house training. At the same time, alternative educational platforms – such as edX, Udacity and Interaction–Design.org – are offering open access to high–level learning materials.

To successfully address these developments, interaction design education might need to reinvent itself."

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TAGS

2014alternative educational models • alternative educational platforms • Amsterdamapprenticeship • Daniel Rosenberg • Delftdesign educationdesign professionalsdesign schoolse-learning • educating students • education summit • edX • Fred Beecher • Gillian Crampton Smith • Hilversum • HKU Games and Interaction • HKU Hilversum • in-house training • interaction designInteraction Design Association (IxDA)interaction design educationInteraction Design Foundationinteraction designers • Interaction14 • interactions • interactive dialogue • IxDA • Jared Spool • knowledge and skillslearning materials • media and services • new forms of apprenticeship • online coursesonline education servicesonline learningonline portfolioonline presenceopen accessopen online coursesprofessional developmentrapid changethe future • traditional institutions • TU Delft Design for Interaction • UdacityUtrechtUtrecht School of the Arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
09 JANUARY 2013

Online Educational Delivery Models: A Descriptive View

"Although there has been a long history of distance education, the creation of online education occurred just over a decade and a half ago – a relatively short time in academic terms. Early course delivery via the web had started by 1994, soon followed by a more structured approach using the new category of course management systems.1 Since that time, online education has slowly but steadily grown in popularity, to the point that in the fall of 2010, almost one–third of U.S. postsecondary students were taking at least one course online. Fast forward to 2012: a new concept called Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is generating widespread interest in higher education circles. Most significantly, it has opened up strategic discussions in higher education cabinets and boardrooms about online education. Stanford, MIT, Harvard, the University of California–Berkeley, and others have thrown their support – in terms of investment, resources, and presidential backing – behind the transformative power of MOOCs and online education. National media outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and The Atlantic are touting what David Brooks has called "the campus tsunami" of online education.

Unfortunately, a natural side effect of this new interest in education and educational technology is an increase in hype and in shallow descriptions of the potential for new educational models to replace the established system. All too often, the public discussion has become stuck in a false dichotomy of traditional vs. online – a dichotomy that treats all online models as similar and that ignores blended or hybrid approaches. This false dichotomy is even more evident now that discussions are spilling into national media forums. But in fact, as my colleague Molly Langstaff has described, educational technology is interacting with innovative educational courses and programs to create not only new language but also multiple models for delivering education."

(Phil Hill, 1 November 2012, Educause Quarterly)

TAGS

1994Berkeley (University of California)blended learning • course delivery via the web • course management systems • David Brooks • distance educationeducation deliveringeducational technologyEducause QuarterlyHarvard Universityhigher education • hybrid learning • innovative educational courses • MIT • Molly Langstaff • MOOCs • new educational models • online coursesonline delivery • online models • Phil Hill • post-secondaryStanford Universitystructured approach • the campus tsunami • transformative process • University of California

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2012

Udemy: crowd learning through microcontent bundles

"There was a time when learning was what we did from birth to college graduation. After that? We just worked and eventually retired.

But the world is changing rapidly. And now, more than ever, learning is something that happens outside the classroom throughout our entire lives.

We now have to learn new skills every year just to stay relevant in our jobs (not to mention making a career change!). And it's not just our careers, we also want to learn and continually improve in the things we do outside of work. Whether it's yoga or golf or photography or anything we're passionate about, we want to be better. Every day we see our friends sharing their new achievements and posting their milestones on Facebook; how do we keep up and reach our potential?

We're busier than ever. And despite having access to a mountain of information via the internet, we still struggle to find structured, comprehensive, trusted sources who can excite us and teach us all the things we want to know. We need trusted experts, guides, to help us on our way – we need the ability to learn from the amazing instructors in the world."

(Udemy)

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TAGS

andragogy • busy lifestyle • career change • changing knowledge landscapeschanging worldcontinuous developmentcrowdlearningdigital education • e-learning bundles • help us on our way • how toinstructionInternet • keeping up • learning • learning capacity • learning the crowd • lifelong learning • maintaining relevance • marketization of educationmicrolearningnew skillsonline courses • our careers • outside the classroom • pedagogyperformativitypersonal development • reaching your potential • reflexive modernisation • reliable instruction • reliable knowledge • reliable sources • self-improvement • sharing achievements • structured content • supplemental learningtailored curriculumtrainingtrusttrust and reliability • trusted experts • trusted guides • trusted sources • trustworthiness • Udemy • virtual learning • wisdom of crowds

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2012

edX: free courses from leading universities

"EdX is a not–for–profit enterprise of its founding partners Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that features learning designed specifically for interactive study via the web. Based on a long history of collaboration and their shared educational missions, the founders are creating a new online–learning experience with online courses that reflect their disciplinary breadth. Along with offering online courses, the institutions will use edX to research how students learn and how technology can transform learning–both on–campus and worldwide. Anant Agarwal, former Director of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, serves as the first president of edX. EdX's goals combine the desire to reach out to students of all ages, means, and nations, and to deliver these teachings from a faculty who reflect the diversity of its audience. EdX is based in Cambridge, Massachusetts and is governed by MIT and Harvard."

(edX, 2012)

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2012alone together • Anant Agarwal • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory • course materialscoursewaredisruptive innovatione-pedagogyedX • extra-institutional contexts • free materialsfree use • global education • Harvard University • interactive study • knowledge-based economylearninglearning and doing • learning for interactive study • learning resourcelearning toolMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyMITnetworked learning environmentsnot-for-profitOCW • on-campus learning • online coursesonline delivery • online-learning experience • open learningoutreach technologytechnology transforming learning • tribe of one • VLE

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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