Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Stephen Downes' keyword pg.1 of 2
30 MARCH 2014

Canadian MOOC pioneers George Siemens and Stephen Downes

"Dr. Siemens, along with Stephen Downes, senior researcher at the National Research Council, years earlier had launched what is widely recognized as the first MOOC, in 2008. It was a course on learning theory offered through the University of Manitoba where Dr. Siemens then taught."

(Rosanna Tamburri, 12 February 2014, University Affairs)

TAGS

2008Athabasca UniversityCanada • Complexive Systems Inc • George Siemens • global strategy execution • integrated learning structures • knowledge • learning theory programme • Massive Open Online CoursesMOOCsNational Research Council of Canada • networked technologies • online learningoriginatorsocial media researchStephen Downes • Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute • University of Manitoba

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 DECEMBER 2013

Open Social Learning: I store my knowledge with my friends

Fig.1 Stephen Downes 2009 presentation "The Role of Open Educational Resources in Personal Learning", VI International Seminar on Open Social Learning of the UOC UNESCO Chair in e–Learning.

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 DECEMBER 2013

Stephen Downes: Trends and Impacts of E-Learning 2.0 (as per 2007)

1

TAGS

2007 • co-op learning • conferenceconnectivism • distributed representation • e-learninge-learning 2.0e-portfolioeducationeducation technologiesgame-based learning • immersive learning • intangible creations • keynote presentation • learning networkslearning objectsmobile learningonline learning • Online Learning Environment (OLe) • open coursewareopen learning • patterns of connectivity • Personal Learning Environment • pervasive learning • PLE • podcasting • RSS Writr • Stephen DownesTaipeiTaiwantrends • ubiquitous learning • video lecture • vodcasting • Writely (Upstartle)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JULY 2012

Stephen Downes: the use of online media and services in education

"Stephen Downes is a senior researcher for Canada's National Research Council and a leading proponent of the use of online media and services in education. As the author of the widely–read OLDaily online newsletter, Downes has earned international recognition for his leading–edge work in the field of online learning. He developed some of Canada's first online courses at Assiniboine Community College in Brandon, Manitoba. He also built a learning management system from scratch and authored the now–classic 'The Future of Online Learning'.

At the University of Alberta he built a learning and research portal for the municipal sector in that province, Munimall, and another for the Engineering and Geology sector, PEGGAsus. He also pioneered the development of learning objects and was one of the first adopters and developers of RSS content syndication in education. Downes introduced the concept of e–learning 2.0 and with George Siemens developed and defined the concept of Connectivism, using the social network approach to deliver open online courses to three thousand participants over two years."

(Stephen Downes)

TAGS

Canadaconnectivisme-learninge-learning 2.0educationeducation content syndicationGeorge Siemens • leading proponent • learning • learning and research portal • Learning Management Systemlearning objects • municipal sector • National Research Council of Canadanew media • newsletter • OLDaily • online courses • online education media • online education servicesonline learning • online newsletter • open online courses • PEGGAsus • social networkStephen Downessyndicationteaching • The Future of Online Learning • University of Alberta

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 DECEMBER 2010

E-learning 2.0: content is used rather than read and resembles language or conversation rather than a book or a manual

"What happens when online learning software ceases to be a type of content–consumption tool, where learning is 'delivered,' and becomes more like a content–authoring tool, where learning is created? The model of e–learning as being a type of content, produced by publishers, organized and structured into courses, and consumed by students, is turned on its head. Insofar as there is content, it is used rather than read– and is, in any case, more likely to be produced by students than courseware authors. And insofar as there is structure, it is more likely to resemble a language or a conversation rather than a book or a manual.

The e–learning application, therefore, begins to look very much like a blogging tool. It represents one node in a web of content, connected to other nodes and content creation services used by other students. It becomes, not an institutional or corporate application, but a personal learning center, where content is reused and remixed according to the student's own needs and interests. It becomes, indeed, not a single application, but a collection of interoperating applications–an environment rather than a system.

It also begins to look like a personal portfolio tool. The idea here is that students will have their own personal place to create and showcase their own work. Some e–portfolio applications, such as ELGG, have already been created. IMS Global as put together an e–portfolio specification. 'The portfolio can provide an opportunity to demonstrate one's ability to collect, organize, interpret and reflect on documents and sources of information. It is also a tool for continuing professional development, encouraging individuals to take responsibility for and demonstrate the results of their own learning'."

(Stephen Downes, 17 October 2005)

Fig.1 Andrey Nepomnyaschev, 'Six Seconds', LooksLikeGoodDesign.

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.