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09 OCTOBER 2015

Is competition good for learning? Exploring ipsative assessment as an alternative

"Ipsative assessment is a powerful and under-used approach that provokes a radical rethink of the purposes and methods of assessment. Ipsative assessment means making comparisons with a learner's previous work to mark progress and enable learners from all backgrounds to achieve a personal best. The seminar presents a case for partially replacing competitive assessment with ipsative assessment in a dual systems approach, and it explores the possibilities and the challenges using research evidence and examples from case studies in the recently published book Ipsative Assessment: Motivation through marking progress by Gwyneth Hughes."

(Gwyneth Hughes, 07 October 2014)

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TAGS

2014 • all learners can succeed • Amanda West • assessment for learningassessment techniques • attainment • Carol Dweckcomparison with previous performance • competition and performativity • competitive assessment • conference presentation • Diane Reay • Dylan Wiliam • George Madaus • grading against external standards • Graham GibbsGwyneth Hughesimprovement against past performance • instrumental conditioning • instrumental learning • ipsative assessment • learning and attainment • learning and development • learning and teaching • learning not outcomes • learning pathways • learning process • marking progress • marks and performance • measuring individual performance • Miriam David • motivational needsmotivational theory • Patricia Broadfoot • Paul Black • performance metricsperformativitypersonal achievementpersonal bestpersonal improvementRichard Sennettself-esteem • self-referential assessment • Stephen Ball • student achievement • Sue Bloxham • unequal access

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JUNE 2014

Collaborative peer learning through pair programming

"Pair programming is a style of programming in which two programmers work side–by–side at one computer, continuously collaborating on the same design, algorithm, code, or test. One of the pair, called the driver, types at the computer or writes down a design. The other partner, called the navigator, has many jobs. One is to observe the work of the driver, looking for defects. The navigator also has a more objective point of view and is the strategic, long–range thinker. Together, the driver and the navigator continuously brainstorm a solution. Periodically, the programmers switch roles between the driver and the navigator."

(Laurie Williams, 2007)

Williams, L. (2007). "Lessons learned from seven years of pair programming at North Carolina State University." SIGCSE Bull. 39(4): 79–83.

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active learning • brainstorming solutions • co-learnercollaborative learningcomputer programming education • continuously collaborating • design pedagogy • design roles • design teams • driver (peer learning) • Laurie Williams • learn to codelearning is socially enactedlearning processlearning software • learning strategies • learning support • navigator (peer learning) • North Carolina State University • pair programming • participatory learningpedagogic approachespedagogic practicespeer instructionpeer learningpeer-production • role specialisation • side-by-side • social learningsocial-constructivist approachsoftware programmingtechnology educationworking practicesworking together

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
05 AUGUST 2012

Responsive Open Learning Environments

"Responsive Open Learning Environments (ROLE) is a European collaborative project with 16 internationally renowned research groups from 6 EU countries and China. ROLE technology is centred around the concept of Self–regulated learning that creates responsible and thinking learners that are able to plan their learning process, search for the resources independently, learn and then reflect on their learning process and progress. Given this task, ROLE's main objective is to support teachers in developing the open personal learning environments for their students where they can train each of the phases mentioned."

(ROLE Consortium 2009–2012)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2010

Connectivism: Learning as Network-Creation

"Networks are constantly forming. As a dynamic process, networks can aggregate into larger structures (a network of networks). Networks can also be deconstructed into smaller structures. For example, everyone has some type of personal learning network. When an individual works for an organization, they bring their network with them, combining as part of the larger network of the corporation. In the course of our daily lives, we move among numerous networks. We are constantly acting upon and being acted upon.

Recognizing that we are continually moving in and out of networks provides an important starting point for rethinking corporate and higher education. Instead of seeing the artificial construct of a program or course as the point of learning, we can view the process of 'living life' as a constant learning process. As we acquire new nodes, form new connections, aggregate into larger networks, or deconstruct into smaller structures, we are continually learning and adapting–interacting dynamically with the world around us."

(George Siemens, August 10, 2005, elearnspace)

2). Siemens, G. (2005). "Connectivism: Learning as Network–Creation." Retrieved 04 December 2010, 2010, from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/networks.htm.

3). Siemens, G. (2006). Knowing Knowledge, Lulu.com.

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TAGS

2005 • a network of networks • adapting • connection creation • connectivism • corporation • daily livesdynamic • dynamic processes • elearnspace • George Siemenshigher education • interacting • learninglearning as a networklearning process • network creation • networksnew connectionsnew knowledgenode • node creation • nodes and connectionsorganisationpedagogy • personal learning network • structuresthe world around us

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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