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Which clippings match 'Forbes' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 JUNE 2017

Girl Talk's Gregg Gillis On Copyright, Curation and Making Mashups Rhyme

"When you listen to the recorded version of Girl Talk's music, it's hard not to get involved with the 'Name That Tune' game of it. ...

You might think that someone who uses other people's music so freely would disdain any notion of copyright, but Gillis, in fact, has a very balanced and contemporary viewpoint. 'I basically believe in that idea [of Fair Use], that if you create something out of pre-existing media, that's transformative, that's not negatively impacting the potential sales of the artist you're sampling, if it's not hurting them in some way, then you should be allowed to make your art and put it out there. I think, even in the years of doing this, the conversation has shifted a good bit.' Gillis has found himself a mashup artist in a mashup culture, and he no longer has to explain what he's doing or defend it. It is telling that no artist that has been sampled by Girl Talk has ever complained."

(Anthony Wing Kosner, 7 October 2012, Forbes)

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2012copyrightderivative worksfair useForbesGirl Talk (music artist) • Illegal Art (record label) • mash-up • mash-up artist • mash-up culture • metatextuality • music remix • music samplingremix culture • sample-based music • transformative works

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 OCTOBER 2014

Fredrick Winslow Taylor and the Myth of Efficiency

"[Fredrick Winslow] Taylor sought to precisely measure the movements of factory workers and their timings to make them as efficient as humanly possible. This made him beloved by executives and detested on the factory floor, and it also made him one of the world's first management consultants. In a recent article in The New Yorker, 'Not So Fast,' the historian Jill Lepore takes a hard look at Taylor and his claims for scientific management. According to new research, he was a better salesman than consultant. Many of his facts were made up, and most of his results never materialized. We now know that Lillian Gilbreth, an early proponent of scientific management, had serious doubts about the movement she helped proselytize.

All this is important because Taylor, with his system of scientific management, was the father of efficiency. From scientific management we get the lust for efficiency in business. It became part of the dogma of business schools, almost none of which existed before his time. Business schools from their earliest days have promoted efficiency and the handling of business as something like industrial engineering. From operations to finance, from marketing to sales, business school education has focused on narrowing problems, identifying resources and working to get the most out of the least."

(Adam Hartung, 16 October 2009, Forbes)

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20th century • Adam Hartung • business education • business efficiency • business growth • business inertia • business leaders • business leadership • business management • business school education • business schools • Clayton Christensencompetitive advantagecost-cutting • cultural myth • customer demand • customer satisfactiondehumanisationdisruptive innovationdogmaefficiency • efficiency in business • factory floor • factory workerForbesFordismFrederick TaylorGary Hamel • history of technology • ideationincremental improvementsincremental innovationindustrial engineering • innovation resources • Jill Lepore • legacy businesses • Lillian Gilbrethman machine • management consultant • manufacturingmanufacturing industries • measuring movement • order and control • organisation leadership • organisational problems • price wars • products and services • Rakesh Khurana • scientific management • taylorism • The New Yorkerwaste prevention • what organisations do

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2013

Mobile Apps: the trouble with using 'Responsive Design'

"Amid an overwhelming amount of mobile options and solutions, it's easy to see why responsive design's singular code seems like an alluring universal panacea for mobile optimization. However, while responsive design aims to scale web content fluidly across multiple devices with different screen sizes, it may not represent the best option for organizations aiming to deliver unique and innovative experiences to customers. ...

The future of digital business depends primarily on mastering the mobile channel. Mobile's mushrooming numbers are due to the convenience of remote access and a new reliance upon the delivery of information when and where little to none was previously available. When developing your approach to engaging customers via mobile, it is key to ensure your strategy accounts for the rising expectations your customers have for this important channel.

Once you understand the kind of mobile experience you want to create, you can decide whether adopting a responsive design philosophy can deliver upon these expectations and goals. While responsive design can help you achieve a certain measure of consistency across channels, the real prize lies with the ability to create unique experiences. A broader multi–screen approach designed dynamically by channel will enable the sort of customer experiences that yield higher engagement and contribute to overall success."

(Carin van Vuuren, 18 November 2012, Forbes)

TAGS

appconveniencecustomer experiencedesign principles • device-specific content display • differencedigital business • engaging customers via mobile • Forbes • Forrester • information delivery • interactive experienceLinkedInmagazinesmobile apps • mobile channel • mobile development • mobile experience • mobile optimisation • mobile site • mobile solutions • mobile strategy • multi-screenmultiple devicesnewspapers • one-web • People magazine • remote access • responsive design • responsive site • responsive web design • scale web content • screen size and orientation • screen sizes • singular code • smartphonetechnology solutionuse case • varying screen sizes • web development • web experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2012

Welcome to the Era of Design

"All businesses, no matter what they make or sell, should recognize the power and financial value of good design.

Obviously, there are many different types of design: graphic, brand, packaging, product, process, interior, interaction/user experience, Web and service design, to name but a few. ...

You see, expecting great design is no longer the preserve of a picky design–obsessed urban elite – that aesthetically sensitive clique who'd never dare leave the house without their Philippe Starck eyewear and turtleneck sweaters and buy only the right kind of Scandinavian furniture. Instead, there's a new, mass expectation of good design: that products and services will be better thought through, simplified, made more intuitive, elegant and more enjoyable to use.

Design has finally become democratized, and we marketers find ourselves with new standards to meet in this new 'era of design.' To illustrate, Apple, the epitome of a design–led organization, now has a market capitalization of $570 billion, larger than the GDP of Switzerland. Its revenue is double Microsoft's, a similar type of technology organization but one not truly led by design (just compare Microsoft Windows with Apple's Lion operating system)."

(Adam Swann, 5/03/2012, Forbes)

Fig.1 "Mille Miglia" bicycle by VIVA [http://www.vivabikes.com/].

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advertisingaestheticsAmazon.comApple • Apple Care • applied discipline • B2Bbrandbrandingbrandsbusiness • business to business • CMO Network • competitive advantagecreativity • customer recommendation • customer satisfaction • customer-centric • customersdesign • design-led organisation • elegant design • employee satisfaction • enjoyable to use • era of design • experience design • feel good • financial value • First Direct • Forbesgood designgraphic designhyperconnectedIKEAinnovative designinteraction designinterior designintuitive designleadership • led by design • marketer • marketingmeaningful experiences • Michael Eisner • MicrosoftMicrosoft Windows • new era • new standardsoperating systempackagingPhilippe StarckPinterest • process design • product design • rewarding experiences • service design • service touchpoints • social media • social-media-fueled society • Switzerland • urban elite • user experience designweb design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 AUGUST 2005

Culture Jamming The Forbes Global CEO Conference

According to a report on the Australian Media Watch programme broadcast on ABC television last night, the protest group calling themselves The 30A Network have managed to "leak" to the media a false statement that the ex–US president George Bush Snr, will be attending the Forbes Global CEO Conference being held in Sydney, Australia. The interesting aspect of the story is that several Australian broadsheets were fooled by the hoax, and have reported the statement as being true. The Sydney Morning Herald for instance still a has a statement on its site reporting that "the star turn [of the conference] is the former US president George Bush snr". This appears to be a prime example of Culture Jamming, where cultural crique is able to inform culture.

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30A Network • Australiaculture jammingForbes • Forbes Global CEO Conference • George Bush Snrhoax • Media Watch • SydneySydney Morning Herald
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